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Defined according to wikipedia it is “a recent and informal geologic chronological term that serves to mark the evidence and extent of human activities that have had a significant global impact on the Earth’s ecosystems. The term was coined by ecologist Eugene Stoermer but has been widely popularized by the Nobel Prize-winning atmospheric chemist Paul Crutzen.”

The images here where created by Felix Pharand-Deschenes depicting how various human influences, from road and rail, to internet cables and airlines create significant patterns covering the Earth. What can we learn from these patterns in how they are influencing the environment
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19 Aug 2012 10:40:00
Vintage G.I. Joe figurers are on display at the 2003 Hasbro International G.I. Joe Collectors' Convention June 27, 2003 in Burlingame, California. Hundreds of G.I. Joe fans from around the country are attending the convention to buy, sell and trade G.I. Joe and military action figures. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

“G.I. Joe is a line of action figures produced by the toy company Hasbro. The term G.I. stands, in popular usage, for Government Issued and after the First World War became a generic term for U.S. soldiers. The origin of the term dates to World War I, when much of the equipment issued to U.S. soldiers was stamped “G.I.”, meaning that it was made from galvanized iron. The development of G.I. Joe led to the coining of the term “action figure”. G.I. Joe's appeal to children has made it an American icon among toys”. – Wikipedia. Photo: Vintage G.I. Joe figurers are on display at the 2003 Hasbro International G.I. Joe Collectors' Convention June 27, 2003 in Burlingame, California. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
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27 Mar 2014 07:46:00
A mudlark uses a torch to look for items on the bank of the River Thames in London, Britain June 06, 2016. Mudlarking is believed to trace its origins to the 18th and 19th century, when scavengers searched the Thames' shores for items to sell. These days, history and archaeology fans are the ones hoping to find old relics such as coins, ceramics, artifacts or everyday items from across centuries. They wait for the low tide and then scour specific areas of exposed shores. "If you're in a field you could be out all day long, with the river you're restricted to about two or three hours," mudlark Nick Stevens said. While many just use the naked eye for their searches, others rely on metal detectors for which a permit from the Port of London Authority is needed. Digging also requires consent. (Photo by Neil Hall/Reuters)

A mudlark uses a torch to look for items on the bank of the River Thames in London, Britain June 06, 2016. Mudlarking is believed to trace its origins to the 18th and 19th century, when scavengers searched the Thames' shores for items to sell. These days, history and archaeology fans are the ones hoping to find old relics such as coins, ceramics, artifacts or everyday items from across centuries. their finds with the Portable Antiquities Scheme. Any item over 300 years old must be recorded. (Photo by Neil Hall/Reuters)
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27 Aug 2016 10:43:00


“The Mahamasthakabhisheka (or Mahamasthak Abhishek) is an important Jain festival held once every twelve years in the town of Shravanabelagola in Karnataka state, India. The festival is held in veneration of an immense 18 meter high statue of the Bhagwan (or Saint) Gomateshwara Bahubali. The anointing last took place in February 2006, and the next ceremony will occur in 2018”. – Wikipedia

Photo: A Jain Sadhu (2nd L) and devotees gather and pray at the feet of the monolithic statue of Jain sage Gomateswara during preparations for the Mahamastak Abhisheka ceremony February 7, 2006 in Shravanabelagola, India. The Mahamastak Abhisheka ceremony is held just once every twelve years where the statue will be bathed with milk, yogurt, saffron, gold coins and other religious items. The statue is said to be the world's largest monolith. The ceremony officially runs February 8-19. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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21 Jun 2011 12:27:00
Monks take pictures with their mobile phones of the mummified body of a monk at Puzhao temple in Quanzhou, Fujian Province, China, January 10, 2016. (Photo by Reuters/Stringer)

Monks take pictures with their mobile phones of the mummified body of a monk at Puzhao temple in Quanzhou, Fujian Province, China, January 10, 2016. According to local media, the monk named Fuhou died three years ago at the age of 94 and his remains was placed in a vat and turned into a mummy as a sign of respect. (Photo by Reuters/Stringer)
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14 Jan 2016 08:01:00
A woman holds newly designed Indonesia Rupiah banknotes after exchanging her old bills at a Bank Indonesia mobile bank in Jakarta, Indonesia December 19, 2016. (Photo by Fatima El-Kareem/Reuters)

A woman holds newly designed Indonesia Rupiah banknotes after exchanging her old bills at a Bank Indonesia mobile bank in Jakarta, Indonesia December 19, 2016. (Photo by Fatima El-Kareem/Reuters)
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14 Feb 2017 00:03:00
In this Saturday, February 18, 2017 photo, revelers take part in the “Guanabara Pearl” carnival street party on Paqueta Island in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Merry makers ferried across Guanabara Bay to Paqueta Island for the parade. (Photo by Mauro Pimentel/AP Photo)

In this Saturday, February 18, 2017 photo, revelers take part in the “Guanabara Pearl” carnival street party on Paqueta Island in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Merry makers ferried across Guanabara Bay to Paqueta Island for the parade. (Photo by Mauro Pimentel/AP Photo)
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27 Feb 2017 00:00:00
Prints of R$ 50 Brazilian reais bills sit on a table for inspection at at the Casa da Moeda, the national mint, in the Santa Cruz suburb of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Tuesday, March 5, 2013. Brazil is likely to keep its key interest rate at a record low for the third straight meeting, as policy makers are caught between a fragile economic recovery and faster-than-expected inflation. (Photo by Dado Galdieri/Bloomberg)

Prints of R$ 50 Brazilian reais bills sit on a table for inspection at at the Casa da Moeda, the national mint, in the Santa Cruz suburb of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Tuesday, March 5, 2013. Brazil is likely to keep its key interest rate at a record low for the third straight meeting, as policy makers are caught between a fragile economic recovery and faster-than-expected inflation. (Photo by Dado Galdieri/Bloomberg)
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08 Mar 2013 06:41:00