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The London Eye -Giant Ferris Wheel

The London Eye is a giant Ferris wheel on the South Bank of the River Thames in London. Also known as the Millennium Wheel, its official name was originally the British Airways London Eye, then the Merlin Entertainments London Eye, and since January 2011, the EDF Energy London Eye.
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10 Jun 2014 12:08:00
Sanaa, Yemen. (Photo by Steve McCurry)

Sanaa, Yemen. (Photo by Steve McCurry)
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13 Sep 2013 10:57:00
Animal Eyes By Suren Manvelyan (Video)

Suren Manvelyan is a professional Armenian photographer who specializes in animal eye, human eye, macro, landscape, portrait and night spirit photos.


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17 Nov 2016 23:46:00
You might feel as if you are being watched when you look at these incredible pictures – revealing the close-up world of a spider's eyes. The intimidating creatures, which look like they should live in a horror film, star menacingly at the camera as every fleck of colour and hair are revealed. But despite their appearance the arachnids are actually jumping spiders, which measure a tiny six millimetres in length. (Photo by SWNS/ABACA Press)

You might feel as if you are being watched when you look at these incredible pictures – revealing the close-up world of a spider's eyes. The intimidating creatures, which look like they should live in a horror film, star menacingly at the camera as every fleck of colour and hair are revealed. But despite their appearance the arachnids are actually jumping spiders, which measure a tiny six millimetres in length. The harmless arachnids, which are capable of jumping up to six times their own height, can be found in grassy meadows and on the walls of houses on sunny days. (Photo by SWNS/ABACA Press)
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08 Sep 2014 10:58:00
A visitor looks at a sculpture entitled “Couple Under an Umbrella, 2013” by artist Ron Mueck during the press day for his exhibition at the Fondation Cartier pour l'art contemporain in Paris April 15, 2013. (Photo by Charles Platiau/Reuters)

A visitor looks at a sculpture entitled “Couple Under an Umbrella, 2013” by artist Ron Mueck during the press day for his exhibition at the Fondation Cartier pour l'art contemporain in Paris April 15, 2013. (Photo by Charles Platiau/Reuters)
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16 Apr 2013 12:33:00
Coloured X-ray of a barn owl. A physicist has used X-ray to create an extraordinary collection of artwork. Arie van't Riets pictures reveal birds, fish, monkeys and flowers in an incredible new light. The 66-year-old, from Bathmen in the Netherlands, began X-raying flowers as a means to teach radiographers and physicians how the machine worked. But after adding a bit of colour to the pictures, the retired medical physicist realised the potential for an exciting new collection of art. (Photo by Arie van't Riet/Barcroft Media)

Coloured X-ray of a barn owl. A physicist has used X-ray to create an extraordinary collection of artwork. Arie van't Riets pictures reveal birds, fish, monkeys and flowers in an incredible new light. The 66-year-old, from Bathmen in the Netherlands, began X-raying flowers as a means to teach radiographers and physicians how the machine worked. But after adding a bit of colour to the pictures, the retired medical physicist realised the potential for an exciting new collection of art. (Photo by Arie van't Riet/Barcroft Media)
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08 Jul 2014 13:25:00
Sydney Welcomes Summer Solstice From The Tower Eye

In this handout image provided by Sydney Tower Eye, a visitor scans the skyline and harbour of Sydney from a viewing platform at the Sydney Tower Eye, on December 16, 2011 in Sydney, Australia. Sydney is suffering from its coldest start to summer since 1960. (Photo by Eugene Tan/Hausmann Communications via Getty Images)
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22 Dec 2011 12:32:00
Australian photographer Brendan Fitzpatrick’s X-ray photographs expose the inner workings of toys. Fitzpatrick’s photographs are both whimsical and mechanical, evoking the curiosity of childhood and the desire to discover how things look and work from other perspectives. (Photo by Brendan Fitzpatrick)

Australian photographer Brendan Fitzpatrick’s X-ray photographs expose the inner workings of toys. Fitzpatrick’s photographs are both whimsical and mechanical, evoking the curiosity of childhood and the desire to discover how things look and work from other perspectives. The strategic placement of wires, batteries, and screws are revealed, the complexity of the inside contrasting with the seemingly simplistic design of the outside. Fitzpatrick uses chest X-ray and mammogram machines to photograph flowers, toys, and creatures, then enhances the color in the images in order to more effectively distinguish the various parts that have been exposed. This photographs are part of series he calls “Invisible Light”. (Photo by Brendan Fitzpatrick)
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08 Aug 2014 10:59:00