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Kew Gardens employee Lauren Bird Royal examines the flowering of the Titan Arum lily at the Botanical Gardens

“The titan arum or Amorphophallus titanum (from Ancient Greek amorphos, “without form, misshapen” + phallos, “phallus”, and titan, “giant”) is a flowering plant with the largest unbranched inflorescence in the world. The titan arum's inflorescence is not as large as that of the Talipot palm, Corypha umbraculifera, but the inflorescence of the Talipot palm is branched rather than unbranched”. – Wikipedia

Photo: Kew Gardens employee Lauren Bird Royal examines the flowering of the Titan Arum lily at the Botanical Gardens at Kew on September 30, 2005 in London, England. For the first time in horticultural history, the Titan Arum lily can be seen at all three active stages in its lifecycle – in flower, fruit and leaf.The flowering corm is nearly three metres tall and weighs 91kg and is very rarely seen outside of the rainforests of Sumatra, Indonesia. (Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images)
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20 Sep 2011 11:13:00
A Chelsea Pensioner poses as he views displays through a floral design of Britain's Queen Elizabeth at the Chelsea Flower Show in London, Britain, May 23, 2016. (Photo by Toby Melville/Reuters)

A Chelsea Pensioner poses as he views displays through a floral design of Britain's Queen Elizabeth at the Chelsea Flower Show in London, Britain, May 23, 2016. (Photo by Toby Melville/Reuters)
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24 May 2016 09:26:00
The floret of a Chamomile flower up close and personal. (Photo by Oliver Meckes/Barcroft Media)

These images have been created using a colour scanning electron microscope (SEM) by the award-winning Eye of Science, comprised of snapper Oliver Meckes and biologist Nicole Ottawa. For a decade the pair, based in Reutlingen in the south of Germany, worked with an old SEM they saved from the scrapheap, but for the last five years they have used a £250,000 FEI Quanta Series Field Emission SEM. Oliver said: “Flowers are beautiful in 'normal' view, but when you look closer, some parts get very bizarre and unexpected structures appear – flowers within flowers, worlds within worlds”. Photo: The floret of a Chamomile flower up close and personal. (Photo by Oliver Meckes/Barcroft Media)
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26 May 2014 13:51:00
High Speed Flower Explosions by Martin Klimas

German photographer Martin Klimas, who you may remember from his exploding porcelain figure series, creates breathtaking photos of flowers exploding into a million beautiful pieces. To achieve this effect, he soaks the petals in liquid nitrogen to make them brittle and hits the flower with an air gun.
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12 Oct 2013 09:52:00
Singapore Sentosa Flower Show In Full Bloom

Women joke around as they pose for photographs in front of a large dragon made of flowers at the Sentosa Flowers festival on January 22, 2012 on Sentosa Island, Singapore. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)
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24 Jan 2012 13:50:00
 You Better Buy Her Some Flowers Ads 123Fleurs

French online florist 123Fleurs.com is promoting its speed of delivery with a series of print advertisements showing scenarios that could do flowers right now. Get online and order those flowers to avoid destruction of your favourite matchstick model ship, your wine cellar and your motorbike.
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30 Nov 2013 11:51:00
Scientists say that a “Martian flower”, seen here in an image from the Curiosity rover's Mars Hand Lens Imager, is a 2-millimeter-wide grain or pebble that's embedded in the surrounding rock. Another, darker-colored mineral grain can be seen above and to the left. (Photo by NASA)

“The scientists behind NASA's $2.5 billion Curiosity rover mission on Mars on Tuesday explained the nature of a tiny, gleaming "flower" embedded in Red Planet rock, and revealed where they'll be using the SUV-sized robot's drill for the first time”. – Alan Boyle via NBCNews.com

Photo: Scientists say that a “Martian flower”, seen here in an image from the Curiosity rover's Mars Hand Lens Imager, is a 2-millimeter-wide grain or pebble that's embedded in the surrounding rock. Another, darker-colored mineral grain can be seen above and to the left. (Photo by NASA)
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16 Jan 2013 11:12:00


Senior hurricane forecaster Dr. Jack Beven studies computer models as he tracks Tropical Storm Arlene at the National Hurricane Center on June 29, 2011 in Miami, Florida. Arlene is the first named storm of the 2011 Atlantic hurricane season and is moving at 8 mph, packing sustained winds of 50 mph as it heads towards the east-central coast of Mexico. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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30 Jun 2011 09:53:00