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The top layer of muskeg and earth (L) is removed at the Syncrude tar sands operations near Fort McMurray, Alberta, September 17, 2014. Syncrude currently produces 350,000 barrels per day of high quality light, low sulphur crude oil according to company reports. (Photo by Todd Korol/Reuters)

The top layer of muskeg and earth (L) is removed at the Syncrude tar sands operations near Fort McMurray, Alberta, September 17, 2014. Syncrude currently produces 350,000 barrels per day of high quality light, low sulphur crude oil according to company reports. (Photo by Todd Korol/Reuters)
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21 Sep 2014 11:06:00
Visitors view the work entitled 'Golden Jubilee' by Chinese artist Xin Dongwang at the 'Extension and Integration: A Circuit Exhibition In Hubei Of Study on the Modern Chinese Oil Painting' at the Hubei Museum of Art

Visitors view the work entitled “Golden Jubilee” by Chinese artist Xin Dongwang at the “Extension and Integration: A Circuit Exhibition In Hubei Of Study on the Modern Chinese Oil Painting” at the Hubei Museum of Art on March 8, 2009 in Wuhan of Hubei Province, China. (Photo by China Photos/Getty Images)
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20 Feb 2012 13:24:00
Ko Min, 26, manually extracts oil from one of three 300 feet deep wells he works on in the Minhla township of the Magwe district October 27, 2013. Everyday, Ko Min makes around $30 extracting crude oil from three small wells after he bought rights to use them for close to $1000 from a farmer who owns the land. (Photo by Damir Sagolj/Reuters)

Ko Min, 26, manually extracts oil from one of three 300 feet deep wells he works on in the Minhla township of the Magwe district October 27, 2013. Everyday, Ko Min makes around $30 extracting crude oil from three small wells after he bought rights to use them for close to $1000 from a farmer who owns the land. In Myanmar, an impoverished country rich with natural resources, people from poor communities find ways to supplement their income by exploiting such resources, such as the Minhla township, traditionally rich with oil, often using primitive and dangerous methods. (Photo by Damir Sagolj/Reuters)
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21 Apr 2014 10:06:00
Rubber masks depicting U.S. President-elect Donald Trump are seen at the Ogawa Studios, a mask making company, in Saitama, Japan, November 21, 2016. (Photo by Toru Hanai/Reuters)

Rubber masks depicting U.S. President-elect Donald Trump are seen at the Ogawa Studios, a mask making company, in Saitama, Japan, November 21, 2016. (Photo by Toru Hanai/Reuters)
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22 Nov 2016 10:30:00
A World War II era P-51 Mustang fighter plane stands in front of a modern 747-8 freighter and a 757 passenger jet at The Boeing Company's centennial celebration in Renton, Washington, U.S. July 15, 2016. (Photo by Alwyn Scott/Reuters)

A World War II era P-51 Mustang fighter plane stands in front of a modern 747-8 freighter and a 757 passenger jet at The Boeing Company's centennial celebration in Renton, Washington, U.S. July 15, 2016. (Photo by Alwyn Scott/Reuters)
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17 Jul 2016 10:53:00
“Dropping” – Artist uses high-speed photography to capture the beauty of ink and oil. (Photo by Alberto Seveso)

“Dropping” is the work of Italian graphic artist Alberto Seveso. Seveso captured these amazing images or “fluid sculpture” with the use of high-speed photography while mixing ink with oil, as a tribute to the dripping technique of Jackson Pollock. Seveso works from his home town of Portoscuso, Italy creating cutting edge imagery for ad campaigns for companies such as Adobe, Sony, ESPN, Nikon and more. Sevese says of his work: “I don't consider myself as an artist, I'm just someone playing with software and creativity”... (Photo by Alberto Seveso)
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05 Jun 2015 08:17:00
Public Space series, 2015. This series by Morteza Niknahad and Behnam Zakeri tends toward cinema, taking an almost cartoonish view of modern life in Iran. This work was inspired by the social life of dolphins. (Photo by Morteza Niknahad and Behnam Zakeri/The Guardian)

Public Space series, 2015. This series by Morteza Niknahad and Behnam Zakeri tends toward cinema, taking an almost cartoonish view of modern life in Iran. This work was inspired by the social life of dolphins. (Photo by Morteza Niknahad and Behnam Zakeri/The Guardian)
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19 Jul 2017 08:26:00
Swiss Company Turns People’s Ashes Into Diamonds

In the past people used to bury their loved ones or turn them into ashes. However, now there is a completely new possibility. Since having an urn with ashes in your house may be a bit weird, you may want to choose the option of turning your deceased relative into a diamond. Yes, diamond! You’ve heard us correctly. By using immense heat and pressure, the ashes you get after cremating a person can be turned into a real diamond. After this, the diamond can be left as it is, and stored in a jewelry box, or it can be used as a piece of jewelry, such as a ring or a pendant, allowing you to always keep your loved one close to your heart. (Photo by djd/Algordanza memorial diamonds)
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20 Oct 2014 08:52:00