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A member of the “Morenada Los Cocanis” group dances during the Carnival parade in Oruro February 14, 2015. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

A member of the “Morenada Los Cocanis” group dances during the Carnival parade in Oruro February 14, 2015. Thousands of dancers and tourists attend the carnival celebrations in Oruro, south of La Paz. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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15 Feb 2015 14:25:00
A member of the Diablada  Urus group attends  the carnival parade in Oruro, Bolivia February 25, 2017. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

A member of the Diablada Urus group attends the carnival parade in Oruro, Bolivia February 25, 2017. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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28 Feb 2017 00:04:00
Dancers perform the traditional “Diablada” or Dance of the Devils during the Carnival in Oruro, Bolivia, Saturday, February 10, 2018. (Photo by Juan Karita/AP Photo)

Dancers perform the traditional “Diablada” or Dance of the Devils during the Carnival in Oruro, Bolivia, Saturday, February 10, 2018. Thousands of colorfully dressed dancers and musicians kick off Carnival celebrations in the Bolivian city of Oruro. (Photo by Juan Karita/AP Photo)
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13 Feb 2018 06:37:00
A mine worker is seen outside “The Progreso” gold mine near La Paz, November 13, 2014. According to local media, the president of the Central Bank of Bolivia (BCB) Marcelo Zabalaga said on Thursday that the falling price of oil and minerals in the international market will not affect the national economy. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

A mine worker is seen outside “The Progreso” gold mine near La Paz, November 13, 2014. According to local media, the president of the Central Bank of Bolivia (BCB) Marcelo Zabalaga said on Thursday that the falling price of oil and minerals in the international market will not affect the national economy. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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16 Nov 2014 12:04:00
Members of the Bolivian combined forces of army and police rest at their headquarters at the end of their ceremony for the task of fighting against drugs and the eradication of coca leaves in Chimore, east of La Paz, December 10, 2014. The government of Bolivia's President Evo Morales eradicated some 11,000 hectares of illegal coca plants and confiscated nearly 192 tons of drugs in 2014, according to the local media. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

Members of the Bolivian combined forces of army and police rest at their headquarters at the end of their ceremony for the task of fighting against drugs and the eradication of coca leaves in Chimore, east of La Paz, December 10, 2014. The government of Bolivia's President Evo Morales eradicated some 11,000 hectares of illegal coca plants and confiscated nearly 192 tons of drugs in 2014, according to the local media. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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12 Dec 2014 13:10:00
A woman looks at La Paz city from the Jacha Qhatu cable car station in El Alto, July 23, 2015. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

A woman looks at La Paz city from the Jacha Qhatu cable car station in El Alto, July 23, 2015. Bolivia already has the largest urban cable car system in the world. Now the booming country is tripling the size of the network and will soon have nine lines whizzing above the administrative capital of La Paz. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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28 Jul 2015 12:50:00
Skulls placed on the floor are seen during a ceremony held for the "Dia de las natitas" (Day of the Skull) celebrations at the General Cemetery of La Paz, November 8, 2015. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

Skulls placed on the floor are seen during a ceremony held for the "Dia de las natitas" (Day of the Skull) celebrations at the General Cemetery of La Paz, November 8, 2015. Bolivians, who keep close relatives skulls at home as a macabre talisman, flock to the cemetery chapel once a year to have the craniums blessed and to bring themselves good luck in the future. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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12 Nov 2015 08:01:00
Aymara witchdoctor Ricardo Quispe, also called “Lord of the Lake”, throws coca leaves during a ritual to predict the future, at the witches market of El Alto, on the outskirts of La Paz, December 31, 2014. Dozens of witch doctors tend to a warren of stalls in El Alto, making offerings to give thanks, to promise luck at work or in love, or to call up spirits and banish curses at the end of the year. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

Aymara witchdoctor Ricardo Quispe, also called “Lord of the Lake”, throws coca leaves during a ritual to predict the future, at the witches market of El Alto, on the outskirts of La Paz, December 31, 2014. Dozens of witch doctors tend to a warren of stalls in El Alto, making offerings to give thanks, to promise luck at work or in love, or to call up spirits and banish curses at the end of the year. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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01 Jan 2015 14:05:00