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In this photograph taken on December 14, 2016, an Indian craftsman works on unfinished cricket bats in a factory in Meerut, some 70 kms north- east of New Delhi. As Indian factory worker Jitender Singh carves out another big- hitting slab of thick willow he insists MCC proposals to limit the size of cricket bats won' t tame Twenty20 marauders. “I don' t think the thickness matters. It' s more about the balance of the bat and the talent of the batsman”, says Singh, who has made bats for many stars, including South Africa's AB de Villiers. The World Cricket committee of the MCC, the guardians of the game, recommended in December 2016 that limitations be placed on the width and depth of bats because it had become too easy to smash fours and sixes. (Photo by Dominique Faget/AFP Photo)

In this photograph taken on December 14, 2016, an Indian craftsman works on unfinished cricket bats in a factory in Meerut, some 70 kms north- east of New Delhi. (Photo by Dominique Faget/AFP Photo)
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11 Jan 2017 14:32:00
Part made cricket bats sit in a box at the Salix Cricket Bat Company in Langley, Britain July 6, 2015. Salix Cricket Bat Company use traditional tools and techniques to make cricket bats by hand. (Photo by Neil Hall/Reuters)

Part made cricket bats sit in a box at the Salix Cricket Bat Company in Langley, Britain July 6, 2015. Salix Cricket Bat Company use traditional tools and techniques to make cricket bats by hand. (Photo by Neil Hall/Reuters)
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08 Jul 2015 12:08:00
Australia supporters celebrate a six during their Cricket World Cup match against Sri Lanka in Sydney, March 8, 2015.    REUTERS/Jason Reed (AUSTRALIA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)

Australia supporters celebrate a six during their Cricket World Cup match against Sri Lanka in Sydney, March 8, 2015. REUTERS/Jason Reed (AUSTRALIA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)
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10 Mar 2015 10:19:00
Papai Simon Ole Mamai of the Maasai Cricket Warriors team from Kenya runs during a match against English team “The Shed” during “The Last Man Stands” cricket tournament at Dulwich sports ground in South London September 1, 2013. (Photo by Philip Brown/Reuters)

Papai Simon Ole Mamai of the Maasai Cricket Warriors team from Kenya runs during a match against English team “The Shed” during “The Last Man Stands” cricket tournament at Dulwich sports ground in South London September 1, 2013. (Photo by Philip Brown/Reuters)
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02 Sep 2013 13:09:00
A cricket breeder shows his two adult fighter crickets on a bamboo tubes called Bumbung. (Photo by A. A. Gde Agung/JG Photo)

Most of people who have visited Bali have seen the cockfighting popular among the locals. A little-known but no less ardent hobby among Bali’s farming community is cricket fighting, or mejangkrikang. The insects face off inside bamboo tubes known as bumbung, and bets are placed on the bouts, which typically last two minutes. Here: a cricket breeder shows his two adult fighter crickets on a bamboo tubes called Bumbung. (Photo by A. A. Gde Agung/JG Photo)
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07 Jan 2015 14:22:00
Victorian and Australian women's cricket team representative Meg Lanning dives for a catch during a photo shoot at Quarry Park

Victorian and Australian women's cricket team representative Meg Lanning dives for a catch during a photo shoot at Quarry Park on October 27, 2011 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Mark Dadswell/Getty Images)
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30 Oct 2011 11:05:00
In this Tuesday, September 12, 2017 photo, Amornrat Simapsaisan, a local shop manager, watches before she ate watermelon salad with bamboo worms, at Inspects in the Backyard restaurant, Bangkok, Thailand. Tucking into insects is nothing new in Thailand, where street vendors pushing carts of fried crickets and buttery silkworms have long fed locals and adventurous tourists alike. But bugs are now fine-dining at the Bangkok bistro aiming to revolutionize views of nature’s least-loved creatures and what you can do with them. She tucked in quite happily to her watermelon and cricket salad on a recent evening.  “It’s tasty. It’s munchy”, she said. (Photo by Sakchai Lalit/AP Photo)

In this Tuesday, September 12, 2017 photo, Amornrat Simapsaisan, a local shop manager, watches before she ate watermelon salad with bamboo worms, at Inspects in the Backyard restaurant, Bangkok, Thailand. Tucking into insects is nothing new in Thailand, where street vendors pushing carts of fried crickets and buttery silkworms have long fed locals and adventurous tourists alike. But bugs are now fine-dining at the Bangkok bistro aiming to revolutionize views of nature’s least-loved creatures and what you can do with them. She tucked in quite happily to her watermelon and cricket salad on a recent evening. “It’s tasty. It’s munchy”, she said. (Photo by Sakchai Lalit/AP Photo)
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04 Oct 2017 06:54:00
Long shadows are cast by players as Mitch Wallis of the Bulldogs passes the ball during the 2016 AFL Round 08 match between the Melbourne Demons and the Western Bulldogs at the Melbourne Cricket Ground, Melbourne on May 15, 2016. (Photo by Scott Barbour/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Long shadows are cast by players as Mitch Wallis of the Bulldogs passes the ball during the 2016 AFL Round 08 match between the Melbourne Demons and the Western Bulldogs at the Melbourne Cricket Ground, Melbourne on May 15, 2016. (Photo by Scott Barbour/AFL Media/Getty Images)
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01 Aug 2017 07:15:00