Loading...
Done
opium poppies

An Afghan holds a bouquet of poppies at a farm on May 13, 2011 near the city of Kandahar, Afghanistan. Afghanistan is the largest producer of opium poppies in the world
.
Details
13 May 2011 20:49:00


Afghan boys attend their Quran study sessions at the Islami Noor religious school on May 12, 2011 in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Despite recent multiple attacks near the city's downtown, children continue their studies at the school. (Photo by Majid Saeedi/Getty Images)
Details
13 May 2011 07:47:00


Afghan police officers secure a transportation headquarters that was besieged for two days last weekend, on May 14, 2011 in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Taliban gunmen and suicide bombers unleashed a major assault May 7, 2011 on locations in Kandahar that included the governor's compound, the mayor's office, police stations, and an intelligence agency headquarters. (Photo by Majid Saeedi/Getty Images)
Details
15 May 2011 08:44:00


Afghan women learn how to make a doll at a workshop sponsored by a Malaysian NGO called Mercy that seeks to help local females to empower themselves on April 15, 2010 in Kandahar, Afghanistan. (Photo Majid Saeedi/Getty Images)
Details
28 May 2011 08:04:00


U.S. Army soldiers carry an injured soldier who was shot in the leg, through a poppy field on April 24, 2011 in the Arghandab River Valley, Kandahar Province, Afghanistan. The injured was evacuated to a waiting Blackhawk UH-60A helicopter by Task Force Thunder Brigade, Charlie company 1st of the 52nd Aviation regiment from Fairbanks, Alaska. It is feared that as weather improves with the approaching summer that the casualty toll will rise. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
Details
27 Apr 2011 08:39:00
U.S. Marines kick in a door while securing a building next to the main hospital in central Baghdad April 15, 2003, which will be used as a temporary Iraqi police headquarters. (Photo by Jerry Lampen/Reuters)

U.S. Marines kick in a door while securing a building next to the main hospital in central Baghdad April 15, 2003, which will be used as a temporary Iraqi police headquarters. (Photo by Jerry Lampen/Reuters)
Details
08 Jul 2016 12:14:00
In this November 3, 2015 file photo, Afghan Taliban fighters listen to Mullah Mohammed Rasool, the newly-elected leader of a breakaway faction of the Taliban, in Farah province, Afghanistan. Despite US President Donald Trump’s pronouncement that there would be no talks with the Taliban following a series of deadly attacks in Kabul, officials say talks continue, but neither side trusts the other and neither believes the other negotiates independently. (Photo by AP Photo/Stringer)

In this November 3, 2015 file photo, Afghan Taliban fighters listen to Mullah Mohammed Rasool, the newly-elected leader of a breakaway faction of the Taliban, in Farah province, Afghanistan. Despite US President Donald Trump’s pronouncement that there would be no talks with the Taliban following a series of deadly attacks in Kabul, officials say talks continue, but neither side trusts the other and neither believes the other negotiates independently. (Photo by AP Photo/Stringer)
Details
24 Feb 2018 00:02:00
Then U.S. Army First Lieutenant Kirsten Griest (C) and fellow soldiers participate in combatives training during the Ranger Course on Fort Benning, Georgia, in this handout photograph taken on April 20, 2015 and obtained on August 20, 2015. When Griest and another woman completed the daunting U.S. Army Ranger school this week they helped end questions about whether women can serve as combat leaders, as the Pentagon is poised to open new roles, including elite Navy SEALs, to women in coming months. (Photo by Spc. Nikayla Shodeen/Reuters/U.S. Army)

Then U.S. Army First Lieutenant Kirsten Griest (C) and fellow soldiers participate in combatives training during the Ranger Course on Fort Benning, Georgia, in this handout photograph taken on April 20, 2015 and obtained on August 20, 2015. When Griest and another woman completed the daunting U.S. Army Ranger school this week they helped end questions about whether women can serve as combat leaders, as the Pentagon is poised to open new roles, including elite Navy SEALs, to women in coming months. The feat by Griest and First Lieutenant Shaye Haver followed a re-evaluation of the role of women after their frontline involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan and the end of a rule barring them from combat roles in 2013. (Photo by Spc. Nikayla Shodeen/Reuters/U.S. Army)
Details
21 Aug 2015 13:03:00