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A Kazakh hunter has taken an eaglet from the nest, given it pride of place in their home and trained it. All hunters describe the eagle as part of their family. (Photo by Palani Mohan)

Kazakh nomads have been grazing their livestock in Mongolia for hundreds of years. Fascinated by the bond between hunter and eagle, photographer Palani Mohan has spent the last few years documenting the burkitshi. Mohan's photos of the landscape, isolation of the hunt, and most of all the trusting relationship between man and bird, convey the importance that the eagle plays in their lives. (Photo by Palani Mohan)
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11 Jan 2016 08:03:00
A young hunter rests next to his tamed golden eagle during an annual hunters competition at Almaty hippodrome, Kazakhstan February 9, 2018. (Photo by Shamil Zhumatov/Reuters)

A young hunter rests next to his tamed golden eagle during an annual hunters competition at Almaty hippodrome, Kazakhstan February 9, 2018. (Photo by Shamil Zhumatov/Reuters)
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16 Feb 2018 00:03:00
Fine Horses And Fierce Eagles Are The wings Of The Kazakh

The Kazakhs are the descendants of Turkic, Mongolic and Indo-Iranian tribes and Huns that populated the territory between Siberia and the Black Sea. They are a semi-nomadic people and have roamed the mountains and valleys of western Mongolia with their herds since the 19th century. The ancient art of eagle hunting is one of many traditions and skills that the Kazakhs have, in recent decades, been able to hold on to. They rely on their clan and herds, believing in pre-Islamic cults of the sky, the ancestors, fire and the supernatural forces of good and evil spirits.
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20 Feb 2014 12:12:00
13 year old Irka Bolen with his eagle. Tradition wise, when a boy turns 13, then are strong enough to hold the weight of a fully grown eagle. (Photo by Asher Svidensky/Caters News)

These stunning photographs show the changing face of a majestic centuries old Kazakh pastime tradition that still lives in the lands of mongolia – eagle hunters. Photo: 13 year old Irka Bolen with his eagle. Tradition wise, when a boy turns 13, then are strong enough to hold the weight of a fully grown eagle. (Photo by Asher Svidensky/Caters News)
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20 Apr 2014 10:33:00
Jonny Simpson-Lee captures the moment these adorable pooches dove head first into a pool. A Golden Labrador jumps for a tennis ball baring his teeth. (Photo by Jonny Simpson-Lee/Caters News Agency)

Jonny Simpson-Lee captures the moment these adorable pooches dove head first into a pool. Here: A Golden Labrador jumps for a tennis ball baring his teeth. (Photo by Jonny Simpson-Lee/Caters News Agency)
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08 Mar 2018 00:05:00
Free Dive Hunters

Without the use of any type of scuba equipment, divers descend to great depths armed with underwater guns, harpoons and strong line to stalk and hunt prey. Some of the best free-divers in the world can hold their breath for up to 5 minutes under water and go to depths greater than 100 feet.
(All photography © Eyeconic Images.)
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26 Jun 2013 14:17:00
13-year-old Emmanuel Festo from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a plush toy that he says makes him feel safe at night and that he sleeps with, in New York's Staten Island, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. (Photo by Carlo Allegri/Reuters)

13-year-old Emmanuel Festo from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a plush toy that he says makes him feel safe at night and that he sleeps with, in New York's Staten Island, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. (Photo by Carlo Allegri/Reuters)
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03 Oct 2015 08:04:00
Ancient Traditional Honey Hunters Of Nepal

Andrew Newey, an award-winning UK-based travel photographer, has captured gripping photographs of central Nepalese Gurung tribe members engaged in a dangerous and ancient tradition – honey hunting.
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19 Apr 2014 15:12:00