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Ocean_Gravity_Guillaume_Nery_Julie_Gautier_(Video)

Elements of nature are too powerful for humans to subdue, yet it didn’t stop the most courageous individuals from trying. Conquering air, land, fire, water, and even the very fabric of reality – this is the ultimate goal of humanity. For now, we can only marvel at the beauty and tremble in awe before the Mother Nature. A short film “Ocean Gravity,” written and directed by Julie Gautier and Guillaume Nery, reminds us of how small and insignificant a human body is, as it is being swept away by an ocean current. Nevertheless, it never stopped people from attempting to subjugate these unstoppable forces, and someday, maybe the humanity will come out victorious.
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26 Feb 2015 15:49:00
A sculpture of a fish made from waste products collected from the sea is displayed during the exhibition Keep The Oceans Clean by art collective Skeleton Sea, at the Torre Madariaga Biodiversity Centre in Busturia, Spain, May 17, 2015. (Photo by Vincent West/Reuters)

A sculpture of a fish made from waste products collected from the sea is displayed during the exhibition Keep The Oceans Clean by art collective Skeleton Sea, at the Torre Madariaga Biodiversity Centre in Busturia, Spain, May 17, 2015. Skeleton Sea, a group of surfers and artists, recycle waste collected from the world's oceans to create artworks and draw attention to the dangers faced from overfishing, pollution and oil spills. (Photo by Vincent West/Reuters)
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19 May 2015 11:16:00
Three Japanese tourists had to abandon plans to drive to Stradbroke Island off the Queensland coast when their hire car became bogged in mangrove mud, on March 15, 2012 near Stradbroke Island, Australia

Three Japanese tourists had to abandon plans to drive to Stradbroke Island off the Queensland coast when their hire car became bogged in mangrove mud, on March 15, 2012 near Stradbroke Island, Australia. (Photo by Chris McCormack/Fairfax Media).
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19 Mar 2012 12:08:00
Tourists walk behind a faded sign warning of tsunami hazard in Khao Lak, Phang Nga province December 15, 2014. Ahead of the anniversary of the 2004 tsunami, experts and officials say key weaknesses remain across the region in the system designed to warn people of the next disaster, and get them to safety. (Photo by Damir Sagolj/Reuters)

Tourists walk behind a faded sign warning of tsunami hazard in Khao Lak, Phang Nga province December 15, 2014. Ahead of the anniversary of the 2004 tsunami, experts and officials say key weaknesses remain across the region in the system designed to warn people of the next disaster, and get them to safety. Thailand prepares to mark the tenth anniversary of the 2004 tsunami, the deadliest on the record, that killed at least 226,000 people in 13 Asian and African countries. (Photo by Damir Sagolj/Reuters)
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21 Dec 2014 11:01:00
One Ocean One Breath Project

The couple freedivers Eusebio and Christina Saeyns de Santamaria, known as «One ocean One breath», exploring the pond around the world, plunging into the water deep down in one breath.
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01 Jul 2013 11:55:00
Brazilians Flock To Ocean For New Year's Eve Ritual

Brazilians celebrate at the annual New Year's Eve beach party on December 31, 2011 for the Copacabana Reveillon in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Konrad Fiedler/Getty Images)
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01 Jan 2012 11:12:00
An octopus is filmed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub. (Photo by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)

An octopus is filmed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub. (Photo by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)
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13 Aug 2013 10:27:00
This undated handout photo received from the Antarctic Ocean Alliance on October 28, 2016 shows a adelie penguin jumping onto the ice in the Ross Sea in Antarctica. The world's largest marine reserve aimed at protecting the pristine wilderness of Antarctica will be created after a “momentous” agreement was finally reached on October 28, 2016 with Russia dropping its long-held opposition. A remote and largely pristine stretch of ocean off Antarctica received international protection on Friday, becoming the world's largest marine reserve as a broad coalition of countries came together to protect 598,000 square miles of water. The new marine protected area in the Ross Sea was created by a unanimous decision of the international body that oversees the waters around Antarctica – the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources – and was announced at the commission's annual meeting in Tasmania. The commission comprises 24 countries, including the United States, and the European Union. (Photo by John Weller/AFP Photo/Antarctic Ocean Alliance)

This undated handout photo received from the Antarctic Ocean Alliance on October 28, 2016 shows a adelie penguin jumping onto the ice in the Ross Sea in Antarctica. The world's largest marine reserve aimed at protecting the pristine wilderness of Antarctica will be created after a “momentous” agreement was finally reached on October 28, 2016 with Russia dropping its long-held opposition. (Photo by John Weller/AFP Photo/Antarctic Ocean Alliance)
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29 Oct 2016 11:43:00