Loading...
Done
Amazon Tribe By David Lazar

David Lazar is a travel photographer and musician from Brisbane, Australia, who loves to capture moments of life, beauty and culture through photography. He is drawn to locations which have a rich cultural background and he is especially interested in portrait and landscape photography.
Details
24 Sep 2014 12:13:00
Chieftain Japarupi Waiapi shows a roasted monkey -part of Waiapi's diet, also based in Manioc and fruits- at the reserve in Amapa state in Brazil on October 13, 2017. When Waiapis walks into the Amazon forest surrounding their village, they do not see trees, but a kind of shopping mall providing medicine, food, shelter, tools and weapons  all under the eye of multiple spirits. (Photo by Apu Gomes/AFP Photo)

Chieftain Japarupi Waiapi shows a roasted monkey -part of Waiapi's diet, also based in Manioc and fruits- at the reserve in Amapa state in Brazil on October 13, 2017. When Waiapis walks into the Amazon forest surrounding their village, they do not see trees, but a kind of shopping mall providing medicine, food, shelter, tools and weapons all under the eye of multiple spirits. (Photo by Apu Gomes/AFP Photo)
Details
27 Oct 2017 08:39:00
Amazon Tribe By David Lazar (Video)

Photographer David Lazar captured photos of native Dessana tribe, nearly 3,000 miles away from Brazil's capital. Tribe is only accessible by boat from city of Manaus. Surrounded by trees, waterfalls and tropical wildlife, this Amazon tribe is a world away from the beaches of Rio.
Details
27 Oct 2016 21:46:00
A worker paints the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO) in Sao Sebastiao do Uatuma in the middle of the Amazon forest in Amazonas state January 10, 2015. (Photo by Bruno Kelly/Reuters)

A worker paints the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO) in Sao Sebastiao do Uatuma in the middle of the Amazon forest in Amazonas state January 10, 2015. The Amazon Tall Tower Observatory is a project of Brazil's National Institute of Amazonian Research and Germany's Max Planck Institute and will be equipped with high-tech instruments and an observatory to monitor relationships between the jungle and the atmosphere from next July. According to the institutes, ATTO will gather data on heat, water, carbon gas, winds, cloud formation and weather patterns. (Photo by Bruno Kelly/Reuters)
Details
14 Jan 2015 12:39:00
Hamar women dance before a bull jumping ceremony in Ethiopia's southern Omo Valley region near Turmi on September 19, 2016. The Hamar are a Nilotic ethnic group in Ethiopia. The construction of the Gibe III dam, the third largest hydroelectric plant in Africa, and large areas of very “thirsty” cotton and sugar plantations and factories along the Omo river are impacting heavily on the lives of tribes living in the Omo Valley who depend on the river for their survival and way of life. Human rights groups fear for the future of the tribes if they are forced to scatter, give up traditional ways through loss of land or ability to keep cattle as globalisation and development increases. (Photo by Carl De Souza/AFP Photo)

Hamar women dance before a bull jumping ceremony in Ethiopia's southern Omo Valley region near Turmi on September 19, 2016. The Hamar are a Nilotic ethnic group in Ethiopia. The construction of the Gibe III dam, the third largest hydroelectric plant in Africa, and large areas of very “thirsty” cotton and sugar plantations and factories along the Omo river are impacting heavily on the lives of tribes living in the Omo Valley who depend on the river for their survival and way of life. (Photo by Carl De Souza/AFP Photo)
Details
02 Oct 2016 08:45:00
Hadza hunters butchering baboon. Baboon is the meat of choice for Hadza hunters. Tanzania 2013. (Photo by Harry Hook/Getty Images)

The Hadza people were snapped at their home on the shores of Lake Eyasi, in the Ngorongoro district in the north of Tanzania. They are desperately searching for a way to secure land rights to preserve their 10,000-year-old way of life. The Hadza need access to unpolluted water springs and wild animals to hunt in the east African country. Here: Hadza hunters butchering baboon. Baboon is the meat of choice for Hadza hunters. Tanzania 2013. (Photo by Harry Hook/Getty Images)
Details
08 Oct 2018 00:03:00
Kambeba Indian, Dream Braga, 18, aims his arrow in a jungle near the village Tres Unidos, Amazon state May 9, 2015. Dream Braga has been shooting fish with a bow and arrow for most of his life. In the Amazonian village where he grew up, that was what kids did for food and fun. (Photo by Bruno Kelly/Reuters)

Kambeba Indian, Dream Braga, 18, aims his arrow in a jungle near the village Tres Unidos, Amazon state May 9, 2015. Dream Braga has been shooting fish with a bow and arrow for most of his life. In the Amazonian village where he grew up, that was what kids did for food and fun. He participated in the Indigenous Archery Project which recruits Amazon native children to compete with modern archery equipment and try for a place on the national team, with the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro as their ultimate goal. After training with Olympic coaches for three months, he has now been promoted to Brazil's national team. (Photo by Bruno Kelly/Reuters)
Details
17 May 2015 11:19:00
A truck laden with logs travels in Araribóia Indigenous Reserve, Maranhão, Brazil on August 7, 2015. Loggers have been stealing hardwood trees from indigenous lands in Brazil. The Guardians of the Forest are an armed militia formed by the Guajajara tribe to protect their reserve. (Photo by Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post)

A truck laden with logs travels in Araribóia Indigenous Reserve, Maranhão, Brazil on August 7, 2015. Loggers have been stealing hardwood trees from indigenous lands in Brazil. The Guardians of the Forest are an armed militia formed by the Guajajara tribe to protect their reserve. (Photo by Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post)
Details
09 Oct 2015 08:00:00