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A girl participates in a New Year calligraphy contest in Tokyo, Japan, January 5, 2017. (Photo by Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters)

A girl participates in a New Year calligraphy contest in Tokyo, Japan, January 5, 2017. (Photo by Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters)
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06 Jan 2017 13:29:00
Pupils participate in a calligraphy contest to celebrate the New Year in Tokyo January 5, 2016. (Photo by Thomas Peter/Reuters)

Pupils participate in a calligraphy contest to celebrate the New Year in Tokyo January 5, 2016. Over 3,000 calligraphers who qualified in competitions throughout Japan wrote resolutions or wishes onto paper sheets during the annual contest that marks the start of the new year, according to organizers. (Photo by Thomas Peter/Reuters)
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07 Jan 2016 08:02:00
Roof-topping enthusiast Daniel Lau takes a selfie with high-rise buildings down below as he stands on the top of a skyscraper in Hong Kong, China on August 15, 2017. Welcome to “roof-topping”, where daredevils take pictures of themselves standing on the tops of tall buildings, or in some cases even dangling from them, without any safety equipment. A craze that began in Russia has now taken hold in Hong Kong, one of the world's most vertical cities, with dramatic results. “I'm an explorer”, said Daniel Lau, one of the three who climbed to the top of The Center. A student, he said roof-topping was “a getaway from my structured life”. “Before doing this, I lived like an ordinary person, having a boring life”, he said. “I wanted to do something special, something memorable. I want to let people see Hong Kong, the place they are living, from a new perspective”. Mr Lau said he had been inspired by Russian climbers and that he was unafraid of the vertiginous heights he scales. (Photo by ImagineChina/Rex Features/Shutterstock)

Roof-topping enthusiast Daniel Lau takes a selfie with high-rise buildings down below as he stands on the top of a skyscraper in Hong Kong, China on August 15, 2017. A craze that began in Russia has now taken hold in Hong Kong, one of the world's most vertical cities. Mr Lau said he had been inspired by Russian climbers and that he was unafraid of the vertiginous heights he scales. (Photo by ImagineChina/Rex Features/Shutterstock)
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16 Aug 2017 07:23:00
A female Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) fighter stands near a security position in Sinjar, March 13, 2015. (Photo by Asmaa Waguih /Reuters)

A female Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) fighter stands near a security position in Sinjar, March 13, 2015. Women fighters at a Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) base on Mount Sinjar in northwest Iraq, just like their male counterparts, have to be ready for action at any time. Smoke from the front line, marking their battle against Islamic State, which launched an assault on northern Iraq last summer, is visible from the base. Many of the women have cut links with their families back home; the fighters come from all corners of the Kurdish region. (Photo by Asmaa Waguih /Reuters)
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02 May 2015 14:44:00