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Chaos Computer Club 28th Congress

A participant works on a laptop on the first day of the 28th Chaos Communication Congress (28C3) – Behind Enemy Lines computer hacker conference on December 27, 2011 in Berlin, Germany. The Chaos Computer Club is Europe's biggest network of computer hackers and its annual congress draws up to 3,000 participants. (Photo by Adam Berry/Getty Images)
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28 Dec 2011 07:22:00
“I’m not scared of breaking the fourth wall”, Wallace has said of the photos where the subject is clearly aware of him taking the shot. “If they are looking at you in a photograph most photographers will think, oh, that’s not a good image. (But) people like to be involved and in the picture. You can see what they are thinking, see them talking”. (Photo by Dougie Wallace/The Guardian)

In Dougie Wallace’s photos of Mumbai taxis, the chatter, yelling, and constant horns of the city are almost audible. A selection of his images is on show at Gayfield Creative Spaces, Edinburgh, as part of the Retina photography festival until 30 July. For four years, the Glasgow-born Wallace focused his photos on one kind of taxi in particular: the Premier Padmini, a 1960s workhorse painted in black and yellow. Locally known as “Kaali-Peeli”, there were once more than 60,000 of them in the Indian city. But thanks to laws restricting pollution, the cars now are fast disappearing from Mumbai’s streets. (Photo by Dougie Wallace/The Guardian)
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13 Jul 2016 13:50:00


BERLIN, GERMANY - JANUARY 26: A video game joystick lies next to an exhibit at the Computer Game Museum (Computerspielemuseum) on January 26, 2011 in Berlin, Germany. The museum, which opened January 21, traces the evloution of computer games through approximately 300 exhibits. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
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17 Nov 2011 05:46:00
South Korean models, with wearable computers, walk the cat walk during the Ubiquitous Fashionable Computer Fashion Show

Young South Korean models, with wearable computers, walk the cat walk during the Ubiquitous Fashionable Computer Fashion Show on November 17, 2006 in Goyang, South Korea. (Photo by Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)
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19 Dec 2011 11:10:00
Aerial view of CRH bullet trains setting out ahead of Spring Festival travel rush on January 31, 2018 in Hefei, Anhui Province of China. About 2.98 billion trips will be made during the 40-day Spring Festival travel rush. China will take multiple measures to ensure a smooth Spring Festival travel rush. (Photo by VCG/VCG via Getty Images)

Aerial view of CRH bullet trains setting out ahead of Spring Festival travel rush on January 31, 2018 in Hefei, Anhui Province of China. About 2.98 billion trips will be made during the 40-day Spring Festival travel rush. China will take multiple measures to ensure a smooth Spring Festival travel rush. (Photo by VCG/VCG via Getty Images)
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03 Feb 2018 06:32:00


“Hedonism(y) Trojaner” is a sculpture of a horse that is made out of resin and recycled computer keys and cables. The sculpture references the Trojan Horse of myth (and more recently, computing) and was created by Nuremberg, Germany-based artist Babis Pangiotidis.
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07 Dec 2012 14:58:00
In this October 8, 2017, photo, Emily Lynch reacts to hitting her first clay target during a training session for the Trigger Warning Queer & Trans Gun Club in Victor, N.Y. A gay, lesbian and transgender group concerned that extremists have become more emboldened and dangerous have decided to take up arms. The gun club meets once a month to shoot long guns in a field in upstate New York. (Photo by Adrian Kraus/AP Photo)

In this October 8, 2017, photo, Emily Lynch reacts to hitting her first clay target during a training session for the Trigger Warning Queer & Trans Gun Club in Victor, N.Y. A gay, lesbian and transgender group concerned that extremists have become more emboldened and dangerous have decided to take up arms. The gun club meets once a month to shoot long guns in a field in upstate New York. (Photo by Adrian Kraus/AP Photo)
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26 Oct 2017 08:07:00
Retired builder Vasili Sidamonidze, 70, poses for a portrait at his home in Gori, Georgia, December 6, 2016. “Unfortunately, Stalin is not popular nowadays. Our people don't respect him. Only we, members of the (Communist) Party, respect him”, Sidamonidze said. “I always try to attend Stalin's birthday anniversaries in Gori. Unfortunately many people don't want to join us even if they live nearby. They look at us from their windows”. Stalin, who was born in Gori in 1878 and died in 1953, is largely reviled today in Georgia, which regained its independence during the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union. Over the years, his memorials have been dismantled, most recently in 2010 when authorities removed a statue of the dictator from Gori's central square. But Stalin is still revered by a small group of mainly elderly supporters who stress his role in the industrialisation of the Soviet Union and in defeating Nazi Germany in World War Two. Each Dec. 21, a few dozen people mark his birthday by gathering outside a Gori museum dedicated to Stalin, where they make speeches and walk to the square where a 6-meter-high bronze statue of him once stood, calling for it to be reinstated. Opponents say it was a symbol of Moscow's still lingering shadow. In 2008, Russia fought a brief war with Georgia and recognised its breakaway regions of Abkhazia and South Ossetia as independent states. (Photo by David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters)

Retired builder Vasili Sidamonidze, 70, poses for a portrait at his home in Gori, Georgia, December 6, 2016. “Unfortunately, Stalin is not popular nowadays. Our people don't respect him. Only we, members of the (Communist) Party, respect him”, Sidamonidze said. “I always try to attend Stalin's birthday anniversaries in Gori. Unfortunately many people don't want to join us even if they live nearby. They look at us from their windows”. (Photo by David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters)
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17 Dec 2016 07:59:00