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Jade Belt Bridge In Chine

The Jade Belt Bridge, also known as the Camel's Back Bridge, is an 18th-century pedestrian Moon bridge located on the grounds of the Summer Palace in Beijing, China. It is famous for its distinctive tall thin single arch.
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05 Sep 2014 09:46:00
Heavy Equipment Playground Gives Adults A Chance To Play In Sand With Excavators And Bulldozers

Dameon Harris of Nevada gets used to the controls of a bulldozer at Dig This October 27, 2011 in Las Vegas, Nevada. At Dig This, tourists take a short class and can then operate full-size hydraulic excavators and track-type bulldozers in a giant sandbox while being guided by instructors over headsets. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
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28 Oct 2011 13:02:00
Two ancient bronze coins, which according to Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologists were struck by the Roman procurator of Judea, Valerius Gratus, in the year 17/18 CE and recently were revealed in excavations beneath the Western Wall in Jerusalem's Old City

Two ancient bronze coins, which according to Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologists were struck by the Roman procurator of Judea, Valerius Gratus, in the year 17/18 CE and recently were revealed in excavations beneath the Western Wall in Jerusalem's Old City are exposed to the media' on November 23, 2011 in Israel. (Photo by Lior Mizrahi/Getty Images)
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24 Nov 2011 15:13:00
Dancers from the British theater company Motionhouse perform a show with excavators entitled “Traction” on the Prado beach in Marseille, France, on May 10, 2013. (Photo by Boris Horvat/AFP Photo)

Dancers from the British theater company Motionhouse perform a show with excavators entitled “Traction” on the Prado beach in Marseille, France, on May 10, 2013. (Photo by Boris Horvat/AFP Photo)
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11 May 2013 12:36:00
A hat and boots belonging to a volunteer with the Israeli Antique Authority are seen inside the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. (Photo by Ronen Zvulun/Reuters)

A hat and boots belonging to a volunteer with the Israeli Antique Authority are seen inside the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. A team of volunteers and archaeologists are searching for remains of The Dead Sea Scrolls, one of the oldest known Hebrew texts, in a national bid, initiated by the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA), to prevent the robbery of such important artefacts and once found to hand them over to the state for preservation. (Photo by Ronen Zvulun/Reuters)
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02 Jun 2016 12:17:00
Art By Thomas Barbey

Thomas Barbèy grew up in Geneva, Switzerland, across the street from the “Caran D’ache” factory, the largest manufacturer of art supplies. He started drawing seriously at the age of 13, using black “encre de Chine” and gouaches for color.
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04 Feb 2013 11:36:00
No Face Day In Chine

Employees wear "No-Face" masks during working hours at a service company in Handan, Hebei Province of China. As a service company, staff must smile to customers every day. On “No-Face Day”, staff wore masks to hide their facial expressions and allow them to relax. No-Face is a character in the 2001 animated movie “Spirited Away”, a silent masked creature who has no facial expressions.
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02 Aug 2015 20:49:00
Remarkable discoveries were made, like the decapitated head of a bronze statue of Roman emperor Augustus, sacked from a raid on Roman garrisons further north in Egypt. Here: A group visiting the excavations at Meroë, including (from left) Midwinter Bey, director of Sudan Railways; Lord Kitchener; General Sir Francis Reginald Wingate, Sirdar of the Egyptian Army; Professor Archibald Sayce; John Garstang; and Lady Catherine Wingate, 1911. (Photo by Garstang Museum of Archaeology)

The city of Meroë laid undiscovered for two millennia before British archaeologist John Garstang excavated it in the early 20th century. Garstang took the radical decision to document his discoveries with photography – and immortalised an ancient world. “Meroë: Africa’s Forgotten Empire” is being shown until 14 September at Garstang Museum of Archaeology, Liverpool. Here: A group visiting the excavations at Meroë, including (from left) Midwinter Bey, director of Sudan Railways; Lord Kitchener; General Sir Francis Reginald Wingate, Sirdar of the Egyptian Army; Professor Archibald Sayce; John Garstang; and Lady Catherine Wingate, 1911. (Photo by Garstang Museum of Archaeology)
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15 Jun 2016 14:49:00