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The Thanatron, often referred to as the Death Machine of Dr. Jack Kevorkian

“Jacob «Jack» Kevorkian (May 26, 1928 – June 3, 2011), commonly known as “Dr. Death”, was an American pathologist, euthanasia activist, painter, composer and instrumentalist. He is best known for publicly championing a terminal patient's right to die via physician-assisted suicide; he said he assisted at least 130 patients to that end. He famously said, «dying is not a crime»”. – Wikipedia

Photo: The “Thanatron”, often referred to as the “Death Machine”, is displayed during a press preview of an auction of the personal effects of Dr. Jack Kevorkian at the New York Institute of Technology on October 27, 2011 in New York City. The device was reportedly used by over 100 of Dr. Kevorkian's patients to terminate their lives. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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28 Oct 2011 12:26:00
This picture taken with an underwater camera shows Japan' s Yumi Adachi competing in the Mixed Duet technical final during the synchronised swimming competition at the 2017 FINA World Championships in Budapest, on July 17, 2017. (Photo by Bernadett Szabo/Reuters)

This picture taken with an underwater camera shows Japan' s Yumi Adachi competing in the Mixed Duet technical final during the synchronised swimming competition at the 2017 FINA World Championships in Budapest, on July 17, 2017. (Photo by Bernadett Szabo/Reuters)
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18 Jul 2017 09:04:00
Wedges of an orange generate enough current and electrical juice – 3.5 volts – to power an LED. The fruit’s citric acid helps electrons flow from galvanized nails to copper wire in this 14-hour exposure. This image was published in September’s Visions of Earth, a trio of photos that appear in each issue of National Geographic. (Photo by Caleb Charland/National Geographic)

Wedges of an orange generate enough current and electrical juice – 3.5 volts – to power an LED. The fruit’s citric acid helps electrons flow from galvanized nails to copper wire in this 14-hour exposure. This image was published in September’s Visions of Earth, a trio of photos that appear in each issue of National Geographic. (Photo by Caleb Charland/National Geographic)
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06 Jan 2014 12:09:00