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A portrait of French WWI soldier Edouard Marius Ivaldi is displayed on a tablet, in this illustration picture, alongside his battlefield grave memorial, a wooden cross with a battlefield helmet in Champagne, eastern France, November 3, 2015. (Photo by Charles Platiau/Reuters)

A portrait of French WWI soldier Edouard Marius Ivaldi is displayed on a tablet, in this illustration picture, alongside his battlefield grave memorial, a wooden cross with a battlefield helmet in Champagne, eastern France, November 3, 2015. (Photo by Charles Platiau/Reuters)
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09 Nov 2015 08:02:00
These black-and-white photos are taken from the new book “Armoured Warfare in the First World War 1916 – 1918” by Anthony Tucker-Jones and published by Pen & Sword Military. “Interestingly the British, French and Germans took completely different approaches with varying results”. The British military produced “Little Willie” in Autumn 1915 weighing 18 tonnes, which had a crew of two plus four gunners. “Inspired by a tracked artillery tractor “Little Willie” was referred to as a water tank – hence the name tank – to ensure secrecy”, said Anthony. “This led to the strange looking Mark I with its peculiar rhomboid shape, designed to cross trenches with guns in sponsons on either side. The Germans saw the tank as unchivalrous and were slow to grasp its utility. They favoured the Stormtrooper (specialist soldiers used to infiltrate enemy trenches) and artillery, not the tank”, said Anthony. “However, they didn’t hesitate to make use of captured British tanks. Although the tank helped secure victory and German soldiers dubbed it “Germany’s Downfall” the country was ultimately brought to its knees by the Allies blockade”. Here: British troops hitch a ride on a Mark IV after the massed tank fleet spearheading attack at Cambrai on November 20, 1917. (Photo by Anthony Tucker-Jones/Mediadrumworld.com)

These black-and-white photos are taken from the new book “Armoured Warfare in the First World War 1916 – 1918” by Anthony Tucker-Jones and published by Pen & Sword Military. Here: British troops hitch a ride on a Mark IV after the massed tank fleet spearheading attack at Cambrai on November 20, 1917. (Photo by Anthony Tucker-Jones/Mediadrumworld.com)
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23 Feb 2017 00:02:00
World's first forest in the sky, the Bosco Verticale green twin towers

A concept illustration of the world's first forest in the sky, the Bosco Verticale green twin towers currently under construction in Milan, Italy. Towering over the city skyline the world's first forest in the sky will be a sight to behold. With tree equal to one hectare of forest spanning 27 floors these 365 and 260 foot emerald twin towers will be home to an astonishing 730 trees, 5,000 shrubs and 11,000 ground cover plants. (Photo by Boeri Studio)
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27 Oct 2011 11:11:00
Mignon 2. A.E.G., Berlin, Germany, 1905. Despite its unusual appearance, the Mignon typewriter is of a very clever design, giving a smooth and fast operation for typing

«Mignon 2». A.E.G., Berlin, Germany, 1905. Despite its unusual appearance, the Mignon typewriter is of a very clever design, giving a smooth and fast operation for typing. (Photo and caption by Martin Howard/Martin Howard Collection)
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25 Sep 2013 08:37:00
The world's first 3D printed car – the Stratti – was built in just 45 hours at the International Manufacturing Technology Show which took place between September 8 – 13, 2014. The Strati, which is Italian for layers, has a chassis body made of one solid piece and has a top speed of 40mph. (Photo by Barcroft Media/ABACAPress)

The world's first 3D printed car – the Stratti – was built in just 45 hours at the International Manufacturing Technology Show which took place between September 8 – 13, 2014. The Strati, which is Italian for layers, has a chassis body made of one solid piece and has a top speed of 40mph. The tyres, seats, wheels, battery, wiring, suspension, electric motor and window shield of the revolutionary vehicle were made using conventional methods. (Photo by Barcroft Media/ABACAPress)
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24 Oct 2014 12:44:00
A German Air Force Officer sits astride a dead boar outside a house where he is stationed near the Western Front, in this 1918 handout picture. This picture is part of a previously unpublished set of World War One (WWI) images from a private collection. The pictures offer an unusual view of varied and contrasting aspects of the conflict, from high tech artillery to mobile pigeon lofts, and from officers partying in their headquarters to the grim reality of life and death in the trenches. The year 2014 marks the centenary of the start of the war. (Photo by Reuters/Archive of Modern Conflict London)

A German Air Force Officer sits astride a dead boar outside a house where he is stationed near the Western Front, in this 1918 handout picture. This picture is part of a previously unpublished set of World War One (WWI) images from a private collection. The pictures offer an unusual view of varied and contrasting aspects of the conflict, from high tech artillery to mobile pigeon lofts, and from officers partying in their headquarters to the grim reality of life and death in the trenches. The year 2014 marks the centenary of the start of the war. (Photo by Reuters/Archive of Modern Conflict London)
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26 Jun 2014 12:13:00
Participants take part in the world's first “Pokemon Go” competition in Hong Kong, China, August 6, 2016. (Photo by Tyrone Siu/Reuters)

Participants take part in the world's first “Pokemon Go” competition in Hong Kong, China, August 6, 2016. The competition began around 2 in the afternoon local time when organizers began announcing the rules on their Facebook page. Contestants had to take screenshots of 12 specific Pokémon in three different districts. Apart from the 12 key Pokémon, participants could also catch designated rare Pokemons which would take off some minutes from their total time. The winner was 21 year old Frankie Chu. The champ took home roughly three hundred and eighty six dollars that he says he will use to pay his school fees. (Photo by Tyrone Siu/Reuters)
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07 Aug 2016 09:05:00
The World’s First ALL Diamond Ring

The world’s first all diamond ring was revealed by Shawish Jewelry and boasts 150 carats carved from a singe-faceted diamond. The all diamond ring costs a pretty penny at a whopping $68 million. I wonder with celebrity will try to nab it. The idea of an all diamond ring seemed to be a fantasy, yet the epitome of art.
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27 Mar 2014 19:05:00