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Fabrice Monteiro travelled to the most polluted places in Africa and created terrifying characters who roamed their midst dressed in eerie debris. They are spirits, he says, on a mission to make humans change their ways. Informed by Africa’s environmental problems, Fabrice Monteiro’s photographs aim to highlight urgent ecological issues all over the world. His series “The Prophecy” is on show at Photo Basel 2017 until 18 June. (Photo by Fabrice Monteiro/Photo Basel 2017/Mariane Ibrahim Gallery/The Guardian)

Fabrice Monteiro travelled to the most polluted places in Africa and created terrifying characters who roamed their midst dressed in eerie debris. They are spirits, he says, on a mission to make humans change their ways. Informed by Africa’s environmental problems, Fabrice Monteiro’s photographs aim to highlight urgent ecological issues all over the world. His series “The Prophecy” is on show at Photo Basel 2017 until 18 June. (Photo by Fabrice Monteiro/Photo Basel 2017/Mariane Ibrahim Gallery/The Guardian)
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17 Jun 2017 08:38:00
Rag pickers collect recyclable material at a garbage dump in New Delhi November 19, 2014. (Photo by Ahmad Masood/Reuters)

Rag pickers collect recyclable material at a garbage dump in New Delhi November 19, 2014. (Photo by Ahmad Masood/Reuters)
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20 Nov 2014 12:41:00
Dan surrounded by seven days of her own rubbish in Pasadena, California. (Photo by Gregg Segal/Barcroft Media)

Dan surrounded by seven days of her own rubbish in Pasadena, California. If you've never thought about how much rubbish you throw away an honest photographic series will open your eyes. Men, women, couples and families with young children have been photographed lying on their backs surrounded by a week's worth of their own rubbish – from old cartons of milk, used nappies and even tampons. The startling series “Seven Days of Garbage” by Californian photographer Gregg Segal is an unforgettable reminder of the amount of waste a human collects in just seven days. (Photo by Gregg Segal/Barcroft Media)
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16 Jul 2014 14:41:00
A garbage collector looks for recyclable waste at a dump in Erbil, in Iraq's northern autonomous Kurdistan region, February 21, 2016. (Photo by Azad Lashkari/Reuters)

A garbage collector looks for recyclable waste at a dump in Erbil, in Iraq's northern autonomous Kurdistan region, February 21, 2016. (Photo by Azad Lashkari/Reuters)
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22 Feb 2016 10:18:00
A boy carries empty sacks after bringing different types of plastic materials to a recycling station in Khartoum North April 16, 2015. People bring bottles and other plastic materials to the station for recycling, and get paid in return. (Photo by Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Reuters)

A boy carries empty sacks after bringing different types of plastic materials to a recycling station in Khartoum North April 16, 2015. People bring bottles and other plastic materials to the station for recycling, and get paid in return. (Photo by Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Reuters)
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20 Apr 2015 12:39:00
A garbage collector, with his horse and cart, prepares to unload rubbish at the municipal dump in Nezahualcoyotl, on the outskirts of Mexico City, February 18, 2015. (Photo by Henry Romero/Reuters)

A garbage collector, with his horse and cart, prepares to unload rubbish at the municipal dump in Nezahualcoyotl, on the outskirts of Mexico City, February 18, 2015. Hundreds of horse or donkey-drawn carts will disappear from the streets of a municipality in the state of Mexico, located on the outskirts of Mexico City, and will be replaced by motorized vehicles, local authorities said. (Photo by Henry Romero/Reuters)
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20 Feb 2015 12:43:00
Vietnam’s Son Doong cave, the largest in the world, could hold a 40-story skyscraper inside. The pristine ecosystem has its own river and jungle. Despite its size, Son Doong wasn’t discovered until 1991. It was lost again for nearly two decades and was fully explored for the first time in 2009. (Photo by Jason Speth/HuffPost)

Vietnam’s Son Doong cave, the largest in the world, could hold a 40-story skyscraper inside. The pristine ecosystem has its own river and jungle. Despite its size, Son Doong wasn’t discovered until 1991. It was lost again for nearly two decades and was fully explored for the first time in 2009. (Photo by Jason Speth/HuffPost)
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27 Mar 2017 08:37:00
A Guarani Indian woman jokes with her son in the village of Pyau at Jaragua district, in Sao Paulo April 27, 2015. The National Indian Foundation (FUNAI) has recognised 521 hectares of this area as indigenous territory, making it the smallest indigenous reserve in Brazil. Members of the Guarani community have now established a new village outside the demarcation and are being threatened with an eviction through a court order. (Photo by Nacho Doce/Reuters)

A Guarani Indian woman jokes with her son in the village of Pyau at Jaragua district, in Sao Paulo April 27, 2015. The National Indian Foundation (FUNAI) has recognised 521 hectares of this area as indigenous territory, making it the smallest indigenous reserve in Brazil. Members of the Guarani community have now established a new village outside the demarcation and are being threatened with an eviction through a court order. (Photo by Nacho Doce/Reuters)
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01 May 2015 12:42:00