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REUTLINGEN, GERMANY - NOVEMBER 17: Students hang out finished parchment leather at the LGR (Lederinstitut Gerberschule Reutlingen) tannery school on November 17, 2010 in Reutlingen, Germany. Even in early antiquity and up their hair or dried goat and sheep skins were used as material for documents. In the small Asian city Pergamon these skins were processed in large quantities for this purpose, so they formed the main trading arm of the city, of which the name is parchment is derived. In medieval times, reached the parchment is of great importance, it was such as France's production under the supervision of the University of Paris. Even now, important documents, placed on their unlimited shelf life as possible large value (eg diplomas, addresses, memory, writings, documents for primary and keystones) written on parchment...
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20 Nov 2011 18:17:00


In his newest series of photos called Low Tech, Kevin Twomey artfully captures the complexity of old-style typewriters and similar machines. Despite being completely outdated, you cannot help being amazed at how complicated those “simple” devises really are. Hundreds of little parts were meticulously put together to form a machine that would perform such “basic” functions by today’s standards. Similarly, very few modern people actually think about how complicated the current technology really is. We take for granted streaming videos, GPS, and countless devises that we use every day, while in reality, these things would seem like magic to even the most prominent scientists from only half a century ago. (Photo by Kevin Twomey)
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21 Nov 2014 12:42:00
Unwanted phones recreated as interactive birds, part of "Escape III" by Anthony Goh and Neil Mendoza seen on display at the Barbican's Digital Revolution exhibition on July 2, 2014 in London, England. The exhibition brings together artists, designers, film makers, musicians and architects who push the boundaries of creativity that digitial technology can offer, and runs from July 3 until September 14, 2014.  (Photo by Matthew Lloyd/Getty Images for Barbican Art Gallery)

Unwanted phones recreated as interactive birds, part of “Escape III” by Anthony Goh and Neil Mendoza seen on display at the Barbican's Digital Revolution exhibition on July 2, 2014 in London, England. The exhibition brings together artists, designers, film makers, musicians and architects who push the boundaries of creativity that digitial technology can offer, and runs from July 3 until September 14, 2014. (Photo by Matthew Lloyd/Getty Images for Barbican Art Gallery)
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04 Jul 2014 10:18:00
Anatomy of Tech Gadgets

Mads Peitersen, a professional artist from Denmark, came up with a clever idea of illustrating the anatomy of technology gadgets. Some of the following drawings are commissioned by the manufacturer and some are just for fun. Enjoy!
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31 Jul 2012 06:01:00
Google Takes Street View Tech Into The Grand Canyon

GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK, Ariz. -- Google and its street-view cameras already have taken users to narrow cobblestone alleys in Spain using a tricycle, inside the Smithsonian with a push cart and to British Columbia's snow-covered slopes by snowmobile.
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11 Feb 2013 09:10:00
Alluvial Fan, China. A vast alluvial fan blossoms across the desolate landscape between the Kunlun and Altun mountain ranges that form the southern border of the Taklimakan Desert in China’s XinJiang Province. Image taken by the ASTER instrument on NASA’s Terra satellite on May 2nd, 2002. (Photo by NASA/GSFC/USGS EROS Data Center)

Alluvial Fan, China. A vast alluvial fan blossoms across the desolate landscape between the Kunlun and Altun mountain ranges that form the southern border of the Taklimakan Desert in China’s XinJiang Province. Image taken by the ASTER instrument on NASA’s Terra satellite on May 2nd, 2002. (Photo by NASA/GSFC/USGS EROS Data Center)
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07 Jan 2013 09:27:00
Tomotaka Takahashi

“Tomotaka Takahashi (born March 27, 1975), roboticist and founder of Kyoto University's ROBO-GARAGE since 1999, creates humanoid robots known for their smooth, fluid motions and sleek appearance. Creating a number of humanoid robots entirely by himself, from concept through to production, Takahashi's designs have been featured in art exhibitions celebrating the creation of Astroboy, Time Magazine's Coolest Inventions of 2004, and promotions for Bandai, Panasonic, and Pepsi”. – Wikipedia

Photo: One of Japan's leading robot creator's Tomotaka Takahashi holds Robo Garage's Chroino and FT during the Robo_Japan 2008 Press Preview at Pacifico Yokohama on October 10, 2008 in Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan. (Photo by Junko Kimura/Getty Images)
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15 Oct 2011 11:12:00


“A monowheel is a one-wheeled single-track vehicle similar to a unicycle. However, instead of sitting above the wheel, the rider sits either within it or next to it. The wheel is a ring, usually driven by smaller wheels pressing against its inner rim. Most are single-passenger vehicles, though multi-passenger models have been built.

Pedal-powered monowheels were built in the late 19th century; most built in the 20th century have been motorized. Some modern builders refer to these vehicles as monocycles, though that term is also sometimes used to describe motorized unicycles. Today, monowheels are generally built and used for fun and entertainment purposes, though from the 1860s through to the 1930s, they were proposed for use as serious transportation”. – Wikipedia

Photo: Cycle inventor Kerry McLean poses for the photographer 2000 in Walled Lake, Michigan. The “Monocycle” is equipped with a 40-horsepower engine, 4ft tire and is expected to reach speeds upwards of 100 mph. (Photo by Bill Pugliano/Liaison)
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02 Jul 2011 12:24:00