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Quirky Magazine covers: Keira and the girl with the pearl earring. (Photo by Eisen Bernard Bernardo/Caters News)

“One innovative artist has created quirky artwork which re-imagines classical paintings with the faces of famous modern day cover stars such as Angeline Jolie. Multimedia producer Eisen Bernard Bernardo, 28, from Los Baños, Philippines, has created the clever works for his series called “Mag + Art”, where he takes photos of celebrities from magazine covers and carefully places them over images of people in famous classical paintings”. – Caters News. Photo: Quirky Magazine covers: Keira Knightley and the girl with the pearl earring. (Photo by Eisen Bernard Bernardo/Caters News)
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31 Aug 2014 09:11:00
Magazine Store By Farhad Moshiri

Farhad Moshiri, an Iranian artist working a lot with carpet media using it as a mean to joke about consumerism culture, was one of the participants of the group show Love Me Love Me Not of Yarat! pavilion curate by Dina Nasser-Khadivi (read on her curating Lalla Essaydi's Harem here) at Venice 2013 Art Biennial. The installation consists of more than 500 carpets depicting celebrities-covered magazines from all over the world.
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02 Oct 2014 12:15:00
The Enemy, 1944. With the outbreak of world war two, photojournalism was enlisted in defence of Mother Russia. In this photo by Anatoli Egorov, who was wounded in action, corporal Stepan Vasiljevich Ovcharenko shoots at enemy troops with a machine gun. (Photo by Anatoli Egorov/Lumiere Brothers Center for Photography)

The Enemy, 1944. With the outbreak of world war two, photojournalism was enlisted in defence of Mother Russia. In this photo by Anatoli Egorov, who was wounded in action, corporal Stepan Vasiljevich Ovcharenko shoots at enemy troops with a machine gun. (Photo by Anatoli Egorov/Lumiere Brothers Center for Photography)
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18 Nov 2015 08:02:00
The Sun magazine's under water fashion shoot with resort style clothes, March 25, 2014. (Photo by Lloyd Fox/Sun Photographer)

The underwater fashion photos featured in the May 2014 Sun Magazine were taken by Sun photographer Lloyd Fox in a pool at the home of Mary Kay and Chuck Nabit. Styling was provided by Sun reporter John-John Williams IV, and the art director for the shoot was Sun design editor Leeann Adams. Photo: The Sun magazine's under water fashion shoot with resort style clothes, March 25, 2014. (Photo by Lloyd Fox/Sun Photographer)
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21 Jul 2014 11:24:00
“The Last Pollen Spore Preparing to Leave a Ladybug Trying to Hold On, Because It Didn't Want to Be Alone”. Photo by Hiep Nguyen Hoang (Hanoi, Vietnam). Photographed in Hanoi, Vietnam, April 2012.

“The Last Pollen Spore Preparing to Leave a Ladybug Trying to Hold On, Because It Didn't Want to Be Alone”. Photo by Hiep Nguyen Hoang (Hanoi, Vietnam). Photographed in Hanoi, Vietnam, April 2012.
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08 Mar 2013 12:09:00
Japan's delegation gather to sign the formal surrender document on the U.S. Navy battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay in a September 2, 1945 file photo. (Photo by Reuters/US Navy)

Japan's delegation gather to sign the formal surrender document on the U.S. Navy battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay in a September 2, 1945 file photo. (Photo by Reuters/US Navy)
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03 Sep 2015 12:43:00
Launch Pad and Gantry with Hermes A-1 Rocket – V2 Launch Complex 33, White Sands missile range, New Mexico in 2006. (Photo by Roland Miller)

Roland Miller is on a mission to document the deserted sites of America’s space race. He has photographed launch pads, bunkhouses and research facilities across the country, some of which no longer exist or are closed to the public on secure military bases. His book, “Abandoned in Place”, is published by the University of New Mexico Press in March. Here: Launch Pad and Gantry with Hermes A-1 Rocket – V2 Launch Complex 33, White Sands missile range, New Mexico in 2006. (Photo by Roland Miller)
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25 Feb 2016 11:38:00
While the lido was described as bringing “modernism to the masses” on the British coast it was just the latest example of a trend that had been developing since Victorian times – transforming seaside towns into resorts for leisure and entertainment. In the latter half of the nineteenth century, the fashion was for local authorities to build great piers stretching from the promenade out into the sea

While the lido was described as bringing “modernism to the masses” on the British coast it was just the latest example of a trend that had been developing since Victorian times – transforming seaside towns into resorts for leisure and entertainment. In the latter half of the nineteenth century, the fashion was for local authorities to build great piers stretching from the promenade out into the sea. The Eastbourne Pier, pictured here in May 1931, was erected between 1866 and 1870 to an ingenious design by Eugenius Birch, which saw the structure sitting on special cups allowing the supporting struts to “move” in bad weather. Arranged on the pier's 1,000-foot length were kiosks, a theatre, a ballroom and a camera obscura. 1931. (Photo by Aerofilms Collection via “A History of Britain From Above”)
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25 Feb 2014 12:59:00