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The designers are encouraged to speak to the driver they are designing for, develop a relationship and work from there: “One can’t tell the story of the other if they don’t know one-another”, they say. (Photo by Sandesh Parulkar/Taxi Fabric/The Guardian)

India’s classic Ambassador taxis and juddery auto rickshaws are iconic sights in the cities of the subcontinent. In Mumbai, one project has been using them as canvases for Indian graphic designers, giving them the opportunity to design new interiors for the vehicles. (Photo by Taxi Fabric/The Guardian)
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06 Feb 2016 12:50:00
NYC Taxi Drivers Calendar

New York to photograph some of the city’s best-humored taxi drivers. These drivers put a face to one of the most dedicated workforces in NYC, driving day and night to transport New Yorkers and our guests alike. This year’s calendar features three returning All-Stars and 8 new drivers, and debuts our first ever husband and wife driving duo.
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03 Oct 2014 10:43:00
“I’m not scared of breaking the fourth wall”, Wallace has said of the photos where the subject is clearly aware of him taking the shot. “If they are looking at you in a photograph most photographers will think, oh, that’s not a good image. (But) people like to be involved and in the picture. You can see what they are thinking, see them talking”. (Photo by Dougie Wallace/The Guardian)

In Dougie Wallace’s photos of Mumbai taxis, the chatter, yelling, and constant horns of the city are almost audible. A selection of his images is on show at Gayfield Creative Spaces, Edinburgh, as part of the Retina photography festival until 30 July. For four years, the Glasgow-born Wallace focused his photos on one kind of taxi in particular: the Premier Padmini, a 1960s workhorse painted in black and yellow. Locally known as “Kaali-Peeli”, there were once more than 60,000 of them in the Indian city. But thanks to laws restricting pollution, the cars now are fast disappearing from Mumbai’s streets. (Photo by Dougie Wallace/The Guardian)
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13 Jul 2016 13:50:00
DeLorean NYC Taxi

A clever PR stunt envisioned by art director Mike Lubrano who got the idea to convert the famous DeLorean DMC-12 from “Back to the Future” into a classic New York yellow cab. The goal would be to communicate the futuristic philosophy of fashion brand Nooka and to carry the message “Experience the Future”
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08 Apr 2014 13:38:00
“Bamboo Mist”. (Photo by John Poppleton/Caters News)

A bodypainter uses UV paint to create electrifying masterpieces of stunning landscapes on models. John Poppletons vibrant Bodyscapes feature bright savannahs, lightning storms and vivid galaxies leaping from the bodies of his subjects. The artist, who lives in Wellsville in Utah, USA, uses a black light on his paintings to make them look as close to real life as possible. He predominantly uses female models and often paints across their backs to give him the largest surface area to work with. Here: “Bamboo Mist”. (Photo by John Poppleton/Caters News)
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17 Jul 2015 13:56:00
Bodies In Urban Space

“Bodies in urban spaces” is a temporarily intervention in diversified urban architectural environments. The intention of “Bodies in urban spaces” is to point out the urban functional structure and to uncover the restricted movement possibilities and behavior as well as rules and limitations.
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31 Jul 2014 13:41:00
Little squirrel in Minsk worked with the taxi driver

Belarusian soldiers found a little squirrel two years ago. The little baby squirrel was just about to die but the officer of the team Peter Pankraty start feeding and taking care of it. The squirrel survived and two years later it just refuses to be separated by its saviour. Now Peter is taxi driver and squirrel Minsk makes him a good company through the entire shift. He uses the squirrel as an attraction and even promotes the tax at his taxi as “Just 45 cents and a few nuts per km”.
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04 Oct 2012 08:46:00
Using body paint and a woodland like location, Gesine appears to have created a model to look just like a red panda, Dortmund, Germany, October, 2016. An artist brings animals to life using body paint and contorted models. At first glance, these images could be mistaken for portraits of wildlife in their natural habitat were created with paper and paint. However, they are actually the incredible works of illusion by talented body painter Gesine Marwedel, who paints models to creates realistic animals. Marwedel, 29, from Dortmund, Germany has always been fascinated by the concept of transferring her designs to human bodies and her latest project features models posing in contorted positions. One image appears to show an elegant swan in a park pond, whilst another picture shows a mother penguin and its chick in a snowy landscape. (Photo by Gesine Marwedel/Barcroft Images)

Using body paint and a woodland like location, Gesine appears to have created a model to look just like a red panda, Dortmund, Germany, October, 2016. An artist brings animals to life using body paint and contorted models. At first glance, these images could be mistaken for portraits of wildlife in their natural habitat were created with paper and paint. However, they are actually the incredible works of illusion by talented body painter Gesine Marwedel, who paints models to creates realistic animals. (Photo by Gesine Marwedel/Barcroft Images)
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20 Dec 2016 12:53:00