Loading...
Done
Origami Masks By Joel Cooper

Origami artist Joel Cooper folds a single piece of paper into beautiful masks and tessellations.
Details
12 Feb 2013 13:03:00
Photographers: Joel Robison

“Hi! I'm Joel, I live in a valley in British Columbia's Rocky Mountains, as close to the forest as I could possibly be! I love to run, bike, jump, eat and create and I hope that you enjoy my work as much as I enjoy creating it!” – Joel Robison.

Photo: “Under Peaceful Skies”, 2011. (Photo by: Joel Robison; Source: Flickr)
Details
24 May 2012 10:44:00
Judging America By Joel Pares

In his new powerful photo series "Judging America," photographer Joel Pares seamlessly fades photos of an unfounded ethnic stereotype with people's real professions. Starting with a simple photo that's based on the stereotypes associated with a person's appearance, Pares fades to their real profession to make us realize how deceiving looks can truly be.
Details
13 Oct 2014 20:03:00
Photographers: Joel Robison Part2

“Hi! I'm Joel, I live in a valley in British Columbia's Rocky Mountains, as close to the forest as I could possibly be! I love to run, bike, jump, eat and create and I hope that you enjoy my work as much as I enjoy creating it!” – Joel Robison. (Photo by: Joel Robison; Source: Flickr)


See Also:Photographers: Joel Robison Part1
Details
01 Nov 2013 10:40:00
My Day With Leo By Joel Strong

These pictures, made by Joel Strong, look as if a giant hand is pinching the head of a poor Leo. Leo, however, is oblivious to this fact and continues on with his life, taking on a role of everyone from an old granny to a young lady. Thanks to Joel’s skill and sense of humor, the cut out heads of Leonardo DiCaprio, taken from 90s magazines, fit perfectly into the new scenes. If seeing young Leo with a body of an old granny or a fat, half-naked guy in the park doesn’t strike you as funny, we don’t know what will. (Photo by Joel Strong)
Details
10 Nov 2014 14:03:00
Photographers: Joel Robison Part3

“Hi! I'm Joel, I live in a valley in British Columbia's Rocky Mountains, as close to the forest as I could possibly be! I love to run, bike, jump, eat and create and I hope that you enjoy my work as much as I enjoy creating it!” – Joel Robison. (Photo by: Joel Robison; Source: Flickr)


See Also:Photographers: Joel Robison Part1
Details
02 Nov 2013 09:03:00
The National Geographic Photo Ark is a travelling exhibition of photographer Joel Sartore’s quest to create a photo archive of biodiversity around the world. So far, Sartore has captured studio portraits of more than 6,000 species – a number that he hopes to double. On 1 July, the ark will open at Melbourne zoo – the first time it has been exhibited in the southern hemisphere. More than 50 portraits will be on display, including many of Australian endangered animals being protected by programs at the zoo itself. These captions have been edited from text supplied by Melbourne zoo. Here: Barking owl. So-named because its call sounds like a barking dog, these birds are native to Australia, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. In Victoria they are listed as an endangered species, and in 2003 there were estimated to be fewer than 50 breeding pairs. The main threat to the species in Victoria is loss of habitat, especially large trees with hollows in which they can nest and on which many of their prey depend. Apart from a bark, they may utter a chilling scream when they feel threatened. (Photo by Joel Sartore/National Geographic Photo Ark/The Guardian)

The National Geographic Photo Ark is a travelling exhibition of photographer Joel Sartore’s quest to create a photo archive of biodiversity around the world. So far, Sartore has captured studio portraits of more than 6,000 species – a number that he hopes to double. On 1 July, the ark will open at Melbourne zoo – the first time it has been exhibited in the southern hemisphere. More than 50 portraits will be on display, including many of Australian endangered animals being protected by programs at the zoo itself. These captions have been edited from text supplied by Melbourne zoo. Here: Barking owl. (Photo by Joel Sartore/National Geographic Photo Ark/The Guardian)
Details
01 Jul 2017 07:45:00
Dromedaries and donkeys are used to transport the salt. (Photo by Joel Santos/Barcroft Images)

Unforgiving temperatures of up to 60℃ (140℉) beat down on these saltminers on a daily basis. The mines, situated in the Afar Triangle in Ethiopia, stretch across 38,000 sq miles and at their lowest point are more than 300ft below sea level. Joel Santos travelled to capture the area’s dry, brutal beauty. Here: Dromedaries and donkeys are used to transport the salt. (Photo by Joel Santos/Barcroft Images)
Details
24 Aug 2016 11:31:00