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A reveller sleeps on the pavement during the Sanja Matsuri festival in the Asakusa district of Tokyo May 17, 2015. The Sanja Matsuri festival attracts over about one million visitors over its duration of three days, when parties of revellers carry portable shrines through the Asakusa neighbourhood, rocking and shaking them in a belief that this intensified the powers of the deities that reside inside them. (Photo by Thomas Peter/Reuters)

A reveller sleeps on the pavement during the Sanja Matsuri festival in the Asakusa district of Tokyo May 17, 2015. The Sanja Matsuri festival attracts over about one million visitors over its duration of three days, when parties of revellers carry portable shrines through the Asakusa neighbourhood, rocking and shaking them in a belief that this intensified the powers of the deities that reside inside them. (Photo by Thomas Peter/Reuters)
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19 May 2015 12:06:00
Nada No Kenka Matsuri, or Nada Fight Festival

Shrine Parishioners pull their portable shrine during Nada No Kenka Matsuri, or Nada Fight Festival at Matsubara Hachiman Shrine on October 16, 2011 in Himeji, Hyogo, Japan. The fight, the highlight of the shrine's Autumn Harvest Festival, attracts 100,000 people. (Photo by Buddhika Weerasinghe/Getty Images)
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17 Oct 2011 09:50:00
Participants with traditional Japanese tattoos (Irezumi), related to the Yakuza, walk through the Asakusa district during the annual Sanja Matsuri festival in Tokyo on May 20, 2018. Sanja Matsuri festival is a celebration for the three founders of Sensoji Temple in the Asakusa neighbourhood with nearly two million people visiting during the three-day event. (Photo by Behrouz Mehri/AFP Photo)

Participants with traditional Japanese tattoos (Irezumi), related to the Yakuza, walk through the Asakusa district during the annual Sanja Matsuri festival in Tokyo on May 20, 2018. Sanja Matsuri festival is a celebration for the three founders of Sensoji Temple in the Asakusa neighbourhood with nearly two million people visiting during the three-day event. (Photo by Behrouz Mehri/AFP Photo)
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17 Jul 2018 00:05:00
People dressed in Samurai costume and helmet march during the annual Himeji Castle Festival on August 3, 2013 in Himeji, Japan. The parade of Castle Queens is part of the traditional matsuri festival around the UNESCO world heritage Himeji Castle. (Photo by Buddhika Weerasinghe/Getty Images)

People dressed in Samurai costume and helmet march during the annual Himeji Castle Festival on August 3, 2013 in Himeji, Japan. The parade of Castle Queens is part of the traditional matsuri festival around the UNESCO world heritage Himeji Castle. (Photo by Buddhika Weerasinghe)
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04 Aug 2013 09:09:00
Festival goer with phallus logo t-shirt during the Kanamara Matsuri Steel Phallus Festival at Kawasaki, Japan on April 2, 2017. The Kanamara Matsuri or Festival of the Steel Phallus is held on the first Sunday of April at the Kanayama shrine. The shrine celebrates a legend of a steel pen*s and was frequented by prostitutes who wished to pray for protection from sexually transmitted diseases. Visitors now wish for easy delivery, marriage and matrimonial harmony. Because of the large steel phallus the unusual festival has become a tourist attraction attracting many overseas visitors and is used to raise money for HIV charities. Phallus shaped candy, carved vegetables, decorations, and a big parade are all part of the festival. (Photo by DELETREE/SIPA Press/Rex Features/Shutterstock)

Festival goer with phallus logo t-shirt during the Kanamara Matsuri Steel Phallus Festival at Kawasaki, Japan on April 2, 2017. The Kanamara Matsuri or Festival of the Steel Phallus is held on the first Sunday of April at the Kanayama shrine. The shrine celebrates a legend of a steel pen*s and was frequented by prostitutes who wished to pray for protection from sexually transmitted diseases. Visitors now wish for easy delivery, marriage and matrimonial harmony. Because of the large steel phallus the unusual festival has become a tourist attraction attracting many overseas visitors and is used to raise money for HIV charities. Phallus shaped candy, carved vegetables, decorations, and a big parade are all part of the festival. (Photo by DELETREE/SIPA Press/Rex Features/Shutterstock)
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04 Apr 2017 09:48:00
A woman eats candy in the shape of a phallus during the Kanamara Matsuri, or Iron Phallus Festival through a street near the Kanamara shrine in Kawasaki outside of Tokyo April 5, 2015. The festival celebrates fertility and is used to raise awareness and money for the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases. (Photo by Thomas Peter/Reuters)

A woman eats candy in the shape of a phallus during the Kanamara Matsuri, or Iron Phallus Festival through a street near the Kanamara shrine in Kawasaki outside of Tokyo April 5, 2015. The festival celebrates fertility and is used to raise awareness and money for the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases. (Photo by Thomas Peter/Reuters)
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11 Apr 2015 10:13:00
Japanese children wear loincloths as they splash about in freezing cold water during Saidaiji Naked Festival, at Saidaiji Temple

“A Hadaka Matsuri (“Naked Festival”) is a type of Japanese festival, or matsuri, in which participants wear a minimum amount of clothing; usually just a Japanese loincloth (called fundoshi), sometimes with a short happi coat, and rarely completely naked. Whatever the clothing, it is considered to be above vulgar, or everyday, undergarments, and on the level of holy Japanese shrine attire. Naked festivals are held in dozens of places throughout Japan every year, usually in the summer or winter. The most famous festival is held in Okayama, where the festival originated. Every year, over 9,000 men participate in this festival”. – Wikipedia

Photo: Japanese men wear loincloths as they splash about in freezing cold water during Saidaiji Naked Festival, at Saidaiji Temple on February 18, 2012 in Okayama, Japan. (Photo by Buddhika Weerasinghe/Getty Images)
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19 Feb 2012 12:18:00
Two office workers wearing summer kimonos Yukata look at paper lanterns as they visit on the eve of Mitama Matsuri, a summer festival at Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo, Japan, 13 July 2015. About 300,000 people visit the shrine decorated with about 30,000 lanterns during the three-day summer festival aiming at comforting souls of dead, especially for the war dead. The festival is after Japan's Buddhist custom to honor and comfort souls of family's ancestors. (Photo by Kimimasa Mayama/EPA)

Two office workers wearing summer kimonos Yukata look at paper lanterns as they visit on the eve of Mitama Matsuri, a summer festival at Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo, Japan, 13 July 2015. About 300,000 people visit the shrine decorated with about 30,000 lanterns during the three-day summer festival aiming at comforting souls of dead, especially for the war dead. The festival is after Japan's Buddhist custom to honor and comfort souls of family's ancestors. (Photo by Kimimasa Mayama/EPA)
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14 Jul 2015 13:59:00