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Women in kimonos look at pictures they took in front of paper lanterns during the annual Mitama Festival at the Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo July 13, 2014. Over 30,000 lanterns light up the precincts of the shrine, where more than 2.4 million war dead are enshrined, during the four-day festival. The festival goes on till July 16. (Photo by Yuya Shino/Reuters)

Women in kimonos look at pictures they took in front of paper lanterns during the annual Mitama Festival at the Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo July 13, 2014. Over 30,000 lanterns light up the precincts of the shrine, where more than 2.4 million war dead are enshrined, during the four-day festival. The festival goes on till July 16. (Photo by Yuya Shino/Reuters)
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15 Jul 2014 10:41:00
A man stands between thousands of paper lanterns, which were displayed and lit up the precincts of the shrine, where more than 2.4 million war-dead are enshrined, during the Mitama Festival at Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo, Japan July 13, 2016. “Mitama” is a respectful word that means “the soul of a dead person” in Japanese, and this “Soul Festival” honors just that. The Yasukuni Shrine is dedicated to the honoring of the souls of those who gave their lives to defend Japan, and this festival is an early step towards the Japanese holiday season of Obon, during which Japanese people honor their deceased ancestors. (Photo by Issei Kato/Reuters)

A man stands between thousands of paper lanterns, which were displayed and lit up the precincts of the shrine, where more than 2.4 million war-dead are enshrined, during the Mitama Festival at Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo, Japan July 13, 2016. “Mitama” is a respectful word that means “the soul of a dead person” in Japanese, and this “Soul Festival” honors just that. (Photo by Issei Kato/Reuters)
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14 Jul 2016 09:37:00
Two office workers wearing summer kimonos Yukata look at paper lanterns as they visit on the eve of Mitama Matsuri, a summer festival at Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo, Japan, 13 July 2015. About 300,000 people visit the shrine decorated with about 30,000 lanterns during the three-day summer festival aiming at comforting souls of dead, especially for the war dead. The festival is after Japan's Buddhist custom to honor and comfort souls of family's ancestors. (Photo by Kimimasa Mayama/EPA)

Two office workers wearing summer kimonos Yukata look at paper lanterns as they visit on the eve of Mitama Matsuri, a summer festival at Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo, Japan, 13 July 2015. About 300,000 people visit the shrine decorated with about 30,000 lanterns during the three-day summer festival aiming at comforting souls of dead, especially for the war dead. The festival is after Japan's Buddhist custom to honor and comfort souls of family's ancestors. (Photo by Kimimasa Mayama/EPA)
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14 Jul 2015 13:59:00
A reveller sleeps on the pavement during the Sanja Matsuri festival in the Asakusa district of Tokyo May 17, 2015. The Sanja Matsuri festival attracts over about one million visitors over its duration of three days, when parties of revellers carry portable shrines through the Asakusa neighbourhood, rocking and shaking them in a belief that this intensified the powers of the deities that reside inside them. (Photo by Thomas Peter/Reuters)

A reveller sleeps on the pavement during the Sanja Matsuri festival in the Asakusa district of Tokyo May 17, 2015. The Sanja Matsuri festival attracts over about one million visitors over its duration of three days, when parties of revellers carry portable shrines through the Asakusa neighbourhood, rocking and shaking them in a belief that this intensified the powers of the deities that reside inside them. (Photo by Thomas Peter/Reuters)
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19 May 2015 12:06:00
Nada No Kenka Matsuri, or Nada Fight Festival

Shrine Parishioners pull their portable shrine during Nada No Kenka Matsuri, or Nada Fight Festival at Matsubara Hachiman Shrine on October 16, 2011 in Himeji, Hyogo, Japan. The fight, the highlight of the shrine's Autumn Harvest Festival, attracts 100,000 people. (Photo by Buddhika Weerasinghe/Getty Images)
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17 Oct 2011 09:50:00
Participants with traditional Japanese tattoos (Irezumi), related to the Yakuza, walk through the Asakusa district during the annual Sanja Matsuri festival in Tokyo on May 20, 2018. Sanja Matsuri festival is a celebration for the three founders of Sensoji Temple in the Asakusa neighbourhood with nearly two million people visiting during the three-day event. (Photo by Behrouz Mehri/AFP Photo)

Participants with traditional Japanese tattoos (Irezumi), related to the Yakuza, walk through the Asakusa district during the annual Sanja Matsuri festival in Tokyo on May 20, 2018. Sanja Matsuri festival is a celebration for the three founders of Sensoji Temple in the Asakusa neighbourhood with nearly two million people visiting during the three-day event. (Photo by Behrouz Mehri/AFP Photo)
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17 Jul 2018 00:05:00
People dressed in Samurai costume and helmet march during the annual Himeji Castle Festival on August 3, 2013 in Himeji, Japan. The parade of Castle Queens is part of the traditional matsuri festival around the UNESCO world heritage Himeji Castle. (Photo by Buddhika Weerasinghe/Getty Images)

People dressed in Samurai costume and helmet march during the annual Himeji Castle Festival on August 3, 2013 in Himeji, Japan. The parade of Castle Queens is part of the traditional matsuri festival around the UNESCO world heritage Himeji Castle. (Photo by Buddhika Weerasinghe)
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04 Aug 2013 09:09:00
Women in yukatas, or casual summer kimonos, take their selfie in front of paper lanterns during the annual Mitama Festival at the Yasukuni Shrine, where more than 2.4 million war dead are enshrined, in Tokyo, Japan July 13, 2017. (Photo by Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters)

Women in yukatas, or casual summer kimonos, take their selfie in front of paper lanterns during the annual Mitama Festival at the Yasukuni Shrine, where more than 2.4 million war dead are enshrined, in Tokyo, Japan July 13, 2017. (Photo by Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters)
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18 Aug 2017 08:39:00