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A figure of a skeleton is seen painted in a hallway of the house built underground by Manuel Barrantes in San Isidro de Perez Zeledon, Costa Rica, March 14, 2016. (Photo by Juan Carlos Ulate/Reuters)

A figure of a skeleton is seen painted in a hallway of the house built underground by Manuel Barrantes in San Isidro de Perez Zeledon, Costa Rica, March 14, 2016. Barrantes started digging through red soil and volcanic rock on his farm 12 years ago to build his subterranean house, between 15 and 63 feet (4.57 and 19.2m) underground. The dwelling, which Barrantes says provides a peaceful and comfortable home for him and his family away from noise pollution and the effects of climate change, now covers about 2,000 square feet (185.8 square metres). (Photo by Juan Carlos Ulate/Reuters)
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17 Mar 2016 15:34:00
An original 1850 puntabout rugby football is displayed at Rugby School in central England, March 18, 2015. (Photo by Neil Hall/Reuters)

An original 1850 puntabout rugby football is displayed at Rugby School in central England, March 18, 2015. Rugby School is known as the spiritual home of rugby. According to a popular version of the game's origins, it was on the school's playing field that in 1823, in a game that could loosely be described as football but was more like a brawl, a pupil called William Webb Ellis caught the ball and, instead of kicking towards the goal, sprinted with it – breaking the code and laying the way for modern-day rugby. (Photo by Neil Hall/Reuters)
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23 Apr 2015 11:57:00
“Natural History”: Tiger. (Photo by Traer Scott)

“Natural History” is a series of completely candid single exposure images that merge the living and the dead to create allegorical narratives of our troubled co-existence with nature. Ghost-like reflections of modern visitors viewing wildlife dioramas are juxtaposed against the antique taxidermied subjects housed behind thick glass, their faces molded into permanent expressions of fear, aggression or fleeting passivity. After decades of over-hunting, climate change, poaching and destruction of habitat, many of these long dead diorama specimens now represent endangered or completely extinct species”. – Traer Scott. (Photo by Traer Scott)
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27 Oct 2014 11:39:00
Syrian refugee girl Nur El-Huda, 9, shows a drawing of her home in Syria, in her classroom in Yayladagi refugee camp in Hatay province near the Turkish-Syrian border, Turkey, December 16, 2015. (Photo by Umit Bektas/Reuters)

Syrian refugee girl Nur El-Huda, 9, shows a drawing of her home in Syria, in her classroom in Yayladagi refugee camp in Hatay province near the Turkish-Syrian border, Turkey, December 16, 2015. Syria's conflict has left hundreds of thousands dead, pushed millions more into exile, and had a profound effect on children who lost their homes or got caught up in the bloodletting. The drawings of young refugees living in Turkey show their memories of home and hopes for its future. The pictures also point to the mental scars borne by 2.3 million Syrian refugees living in Turkey, more than half of them children. (Photo by Umit Bektas/Reuters)
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16 Jan 2016 08:05:00
A lighting bolt flashes in the sky as U.S. Army M1A1 Abram tanks roll through the desert

A lighting bolt flashes in the sky as U.S. Army M1A1 Abram tanks roll through the desert December 9, 2002 near the Iraqi border in Kuwait. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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20 Sep 2011 12:45:00
Impala pictured

Impala pictured in the Kruger National Park on December 7, 2007 in Mpumalanga, South Africa. (Photo by Warren Little/Getty Images)
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16 Aug 2011 12:20:00
An airplane house is pictured in the village of Miziara, northern Lebanon May 12, 2015. Miziara prides itself on building residential homes that resemble ancient Greek temples and Egyptian ruins, one is even built in the shape of an Airbus A380. (Photo by Aziz Taher/Reuters)

An airplane house is pictured in the village of Miziara, northern Lebanon May 12, 2015. Miziara prides itself on building residential homes that resemble ancient Greek temples and Egyptian ruins, one is even built in the shape of an Airbus A380. (Photo by Aziz Taher/Reuters)
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22 May 2015 12:40:00
Cordwood Construction - Natural Building

Cordwood construction is a method of natural building that originated roughly one thousand years ago in Greece and Siberia. This method involves using pieces of wood that slightly protrude from the mortar, giving the walls an attractive appearance. Usually, the walls are made 12 to 24 inches thick. However, in some parts of Canada, the walls can be as thick as 36 inches. This method appeals to many people due to its ease of construction economy of resources. Cordwood Construction can be separated into two main types: mortar-insulation-mortar (M-I-M) and Throughwall. M-I-M is a more preferable and widely used choice as it allows for better insulating properties.
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27 Nov 2014 15:10:00