Loading...
Done
It’s enough to make your head spin. The photographer Katherine Young set out to shoot spiral staircases in London, England to great effect, including this shot she calls the Downward Spiral Part III. (Photo by Katherine Young/Rex Features/Shutterstock)

It’s enough to make your head spin. The photographer Katherine Young set out to shoot spiral staircases in London, England to great effect, including this shot she calls the Downward Spiral Part III. (Photo by Katherine Young/Rex Features/Shutterstock)
Details
16 Aug 2017 07:18:00
Watch your step on this Polish spiral staircase. (Photo by Roman Robroek/South West News Service)

Urban photographer Roman Robroek spent five years scouring the continent for the grandest examples of forgotten architectural beauty. Here: Watch your step on this Polish spiral staircase. (Photo by Roman Robroek/South West News Service)
Details
28 Aug 2018 00:03:00
A 20 metre high spiral staircase in a tower used as an emergency exit, is seen inside a Federal Reserve bank (Bundesbank) bunker, prior to the bunker's official opening to the public in Cochem, Germany, March 18, 2016. (Photo by Kai Pfaffenbach/Reuters)

A 20 metre high spiral staircase in a tower used as an emergency exit, is seen inside a Federal Reserve bank (Bundesbank) bunker, prior to the bunker's official opening to the public in Cochem, Germany, March 18, 2016. West Germany's Central Bank (Deutsche Bundesbank) stored some 20 billion German marks of emergency notes in two underground bunkers, one in Frankfurt the other in Cochem, between 1964-1988 during the cold war. (Photo by Kai Pfaffenbach/Reuters)
Details
19 Mar 2016 12:36:00
“Eye of the Tower” by Mehmet Yasa; Verona, Italy. “The staircase and the bell looks like an eye. Architecture can fascinate us in many ways”. (Photo by Mehmet Yasa/Art of Building Photography Awards 2017)

“Eye of the Tower” by Mehmet Yasa; Verona, Italy. “The staircase and the bell looks like an eye. Architecture can fascinate us in many ways”. (Photo by Mehmet Yasa/Art of Building Photography Awards 2017)
Details
12 Dec 2017 06:41:00
“These Rajasthani sisters were sitting on the staircase inside their house relaxing and enjoy a cup of masala chai”. (Photo by Firdaus Hadzri/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest)

“These Rajasthani sisters were sitting on the staircase inside their house relaxing and enjoy a cup of masala chai”. (Photo by Firdaus Hadzri/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest)
Details
13 Apr 2018 00:01:00
Drawn With Pencil And Pen by Rafael Araujo

Only with a pencil, ruler and protractor, without the help of a computer, Venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo creates complex fields of three dimensional space where butterflies come to life and shells rise from mathematical spirals.
Details
23 Feb 2014 09:38:00
A talented body painter has created a series of mind-bending illusions that cover entire torsos. Natalie Fletcher’s work are enough to make people double-take, the spiraling patterns of some appearing to fade into the abyss. In other works, the artists designs look as though they are never ending, while some show body parts appearing to protrude from models chests. The idea behind the ongoing series came to Natalie, 30, as a means of keeping entertained during the winter months. Here: Optical illusion bodypaint. (Photo by Natalie Fletcher/Cater News)

A talented body painter has created a series of mind-bending illusions that cover entire torsos. Natalie Fletcher’s work are enough to make people double-take, the spiraling patterns of some appearing to fade into the abyss. In other works, the artists designs look as though they are never ending, while some show body parts appearing to protrude from models chests. The idea behind the ongoing series came to Natalie, 30, as a means of keeping entertained during the winter months. Here: Optical illusion bodypaint. (Photo by Natalie Fletcher/Cater News)
Details
13 Apr 2016 09:17:00
Rob Heard's Wooden Bough House

Living on the edge of Exmoor, Rob takes his inspiration from the rolling countryside surrounding his home, where each Bough House sculpture takes several months to construct. The designs do not follow an explicit plan or process, each piece is unique. They evolve and flow freely, as part of a creative journey which has no natural limit, whilst also revealing great logic and engineering integrity. Every aerial walkway or staircase leads to a room - there are no dead-ends and every turret and tower can be reached.
Details
29 May 2013 10:31:00