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Buddhist monks walk past a statue of comic character the Hulk at Tamru temple in Samut Prakan province, Thailand, March 3, 2016. (Photo by Chaiwat Subprasom/Reuters)

Buddhist monks walk past a statue of comic character the Hulk at Tamru temple in Samut Prakan province, Thailand, March 3, 2016. It’s a sign of changing times for Buddhism in Thailand when one sees temples, including Wat Tam Ru, using U.S. comic superheroes to attract children and teenagers into the religion. (Photo by Chaiwat Subprasom/Reuters)
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04 Mar 2016 11:59:00
Dad Superhero By Giulia Pex

Italian photographer and illustrator Giulia Pex has made a statement to the world using her dual crafts. She declared boldly “Dad, You Are My Favorite Superhero” by taking a series of family photographs of her father in ordinary settings.
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11 May 2014 11:40:00
Watercolor Superheroes By Blule

Blule is the brand of French illustrator/designer, Clementine, who currently resides in Australia and has worked as an industrial designer for companies such as Fila, and L’Oreal among others. She starts every image with a pencil sketch on handmade Indian watercolor paper sheet and uses high quality French watercolor paint to achieve the desired effect.
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22 Jun 2014 10:10:00
Lonely Superheroes By Benoit Lapray

What do superheroes do when they’re not busy fighting bad guys and saving the world from destruction? Perhaps they’re drawing strength alone in the peace and quiet of the great outdoors. That’s the premise of French photographer Benoit Lapray‘s photo-manipulation series “The Quest for the Absolute.”
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23 Sep 2014 10:50:00
#1: Superman. According to McAfee, 16.50% of Web searches for Superman led to sites with viruses and other malicious software. Pictured here: The Superman costume that was worn by Christopher Reeve in “Superman: The Movie” on display at Profiles In History in Calabasas, northwest of downtown Los Angeles, on July 19, 2012 in California. (Photo by Frederic J. Brown/AFP Photo)

#1: Superman. According to McAfee, 16.50% of Web searches for Superman led to sites with viruses and other malicious software. Pictured here: The Superman costume that was worn by Christopher Reeve in “Superman: The Movie” on display at Profiles In History in Calabasas, northwest of downtown Los Angeles, on July 19, 2012 in California. (Photo by Frederic J. Brown/AFP Photo)
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16 Jul 2014 14:04:00
Superhero Kids by Andy Fairhurst

Bat Kid

This is a series of illustrations by artist Andy Fairhurst of children's silhouettes as they pretend to be their favorite superheroes. They're awesome -- every single one (and there's 19!). Reminds me of when I was a kid on the school playground, swinging around on the tetherball rope pretending to be Spiderman. *sniffle* Nobody would ever play superheroes with me. "You weren't a very popular kid, were you?" You sh*t your pants in class ONE TIME.
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28 Dec 2012 12:55:00


Window washers from the American National Skyline company (from left to right in the image below: Jordan Emerson, Steve Oszaniec and Danny Oszaniec) suit up as Marvel Comics superheroes to pleasantly surprise the children (who are patients) and their families inside as the dressed up crew cleans the outside of the windows at Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital in Memphis
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08 Sep 2013 09:02:00
Nicolas Silberfaden: Superheroes

Due to the current economic, social and cultural crisis in The United States of America today, I have decided to do a photographic project consisting of a series of studio portraits of superhero and celebrity impersonators that live and work in the city of Los Angeles. Most of them unemployed Americans, they decided to suit up with their costumes and hit the streets, animate parties and events in efforts to make ends meet. Making them pose in their costumes against a colorful backdrop, I ask them to manifest feelings of genuine sadness – honest emotions that are a consequence of our current times. The result is a somber, striking visual image that contradicts the iconic nature of strength and moral righteousness typical in American superhero and celebrity imagery. Creating the illusion that Superman does exist – that he too was fallible and affected by America’s downturn.

Nicolas Silberfaden
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06 Dec 2012 12:13:00