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Gertrude “Billie” Murphy, 22, is brought in for questioning in the murder case of Michael Stopec, who was shot and killed in an apartment hotel, circa July 1927.  Murphy had been friends of the married Stopec and his suspected killer Henry Guardino, 31. (Photo by Chicago Herald & Examiner Historical Photo)

Gertrude “Billie” Murphy, 22, is brought in for questioning in the murder case of Michael Stopec, who was shot and killed in an apartment hotel, circa July 1927. Murphy had been friends of the married Stopec and his suspected killer Henry Guardino, 31. It is said that Stopec and Guardino were “bitter rivals for the favor of Billie” and that Murphy had tired of Guardino and was going to stay with Stopec. Murphy was also married to a man in the Joliet penitentiary. (Photo by Chicago Herald & Examiner Historical Photo)
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29 Jul 2014 11:28:00
Mug shot of De Gracy (sic) and Edward Dalton. Details unknown. Central Police Station, Sydney, around 1920

Mug shot of De Gracy (sic) and Edward Dalton. Details unknown. Central Police Station, Sydney, around 1920. (Photo by NSW Police Forensic Photography Archive, Justice & Police Museum, Histiric Houses Trust of NSW)
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21 Apr 2012 12:24:00
Mug shot of William Stanley Moore, 1 May 1925, Central Police Station, Sydney

Mug shot of William Stanley Moore, 1 May 1925, Central Police Station, Sydney. This picture appears in the Photo Supplement to the NSW Police Gazette, 28 July, 1926 captioned: “Opium dealer. Operates with large quantities of faked opium and cocaine. A wharf labourer; associates with water front thieves and drug traders”. (Photo by NSW Police Forensic Photography Archive, Justice & Police Museum, Histiric Houses Trust of NSW)
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24 Apr 2012 11:46:00
Crime Tatoo  Part 3

Tattoos are commonly used among criminals to show gang membership and record the wearer's personal history—such as his or her skills, specialties, accomplishments and convictions. They are also used as a means of personal expression. Certain designs have developed recognized coded meanings. The code systems can be quite complex and because of the nature of what they encode, the tattoo designs are not widely recognized.
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25 Apr 2013 10:12:00
A neighborhood watch volunteer stands guard on her street on February 9, 2017 in Peronia, Guatemala. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

A neighborhood watch volunteer stands guard on her street on February 9, 2017 in Peronia, Guatemala. Residents of Peronia, south of Guatemala City organized block by block to secure their community after ten of their neighbors in January were killed, they say, for refusing to pay extortion money to gangs. Armed with machetes and sticks, residents take turns each night, baring strangers' entry into their neighborhoods. Violence and poverty continue to drive emigration from Central America to the United States, even as the Trump administration moves to tighten border security. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
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11 Feb 2017 00:00:00
Crime Tatoo  Part 1

Tattoos are commonly used among criminals to show gang membership and record the wearer's personal history—such as his or her skills, specialties, accomplishments and convictions. They are also used as a means of personal expression. Certain designs have developed recognized coded meanings. The code systems can be quite complex and because of the nature of what they encode, the tattoo designs are not widely recognized.
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23 Apr 2013 10:29:00
Fennec foxes are captured for the illegal pet trade. This three-month-old pup was for sale in a market in southern Tunisia. (Photo by Bruno D'Amicis/Photographers Against Wildlife Crime/Wildscreen/The Guardian)

In a new project, an international group of photographers have joined forces to use their powerful images to raise awareness and funds to help stop the illegal wildlife trade. Here: Fennec foxes are captured for the illegal pet trade. This three-month-old pup was for sale in a market in southern Tunisia. (Photo by Bruno D'Amicis/Photographers Against Wildlife Crime/Wildscreen/The Guardian)
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17 Oct 2017 06:05:00
The anthropometric record card of Sarah Giles, a servant who was convicted of stealing in 1897, on display making up part of a mosaic of cards on a table top during a press preview for the Crime Museum Uncovered exhibition at the Museum of London in the City of London, Wednesday, October 7, 2015. (Photo by Alastair Grant/AP Photo)

The anthropometric record card of Sarah Giles, a servant who was convicted of stealing in 1897, on display making up part of a mosaic of cards on a table top during a press preview for the Crime Museum Uncovered exhibition at the Museum of London in the City of London, Wednesday, October 7, 2015. Drawn from Scotland Yard's private collection, the show charts more than a century of violence and suffering, from the murders of Jack the Ripper to IRA and al-Qaida bombings. But it also celebrates the brains, bravery and scientific advances that helped catch perpetrators and solve crimes. (Photo by Alastair Grant/AP Photo)
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11 Oct 2015 08:00:00