Loading...
Done
The OMG Wall (Groningen, Groningen, NL). (Photo by Wout)

The “OMG Wall” (Groningen, NL). (Photo by Wout)
Details
07 Jun 2013 11:56:00
A man walks across a vat of water used to wash the hide. (Photo by Rezza Estily/JG Photo)

Sukaregang in Garut district, West Java, has long been a bustling center for Indonesia's leather trade, with some shops producing and selling various goods – including bags, shoes and jackets – since the 1940s. The industrial area is also a major supplier for high-end brands from across the globe, catering to the fashion, auto and motor-sports industry. Here: a man walks across a vat of water used to wash the hide. (Photo by Rezza Estily/JG Photo)
Details
31 Mar 2015 13:29:00
In this Thursday, February 9, 2017 photo, a Bangladeshi boy pulls a rickshaw loaded with strips of leather at the highly polluted Hazaribagh tannery area in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Hazardous, heavily polluting tanneries with workers as young as 14 supplied leather to companies that make shoes and handbags for Western brands, a nonprofit group that investigates supply chains says. (Photo by A.M. Ahad/AP Photo)

In this Thursday, February 9, 2017 photo, a Bangladeshi boy pulls a rickshaw loaded with strips of leather at the highly polluted Hazaribagh tannery area in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Hazardous, heavily polluting tanneries with workers as young as 14 supplied leather to companies that make shoes and handbags for Western brands, a nonprofit group that investigates supply chains says. (Photo by A.M. Ahad/AP Photo)
Details
25 Mar 2017 08:02:00
Faruk, 17, a Rohingya refugee trader holds betel leaves which are on sale at a stall in Palong Khali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, November 3, 2017. He left his village in Myanmar when the military opened fire towards the Rohingya. “I buy this betel leaf from Palong Khali market, in one bundle there are 160 pieces, I buy it for 80 taka and I sell it for 100 taka. Bangladeshi's and I sell for the same rate in the camp. Outside in the local market it is 80 taka per bundle. My problem is that I don't have money so I can't buy anything to eat, I can't buy fish to eat”, he said. (Photo by Hannah McKay/Reuters)

Faruk, 17, a Rohingya refugee trader holds betel leaves which are on sale at a stall in Palong Khali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, November 3, 2017. He left his village in Myanmar when the military opened fire towards the Rohingya. “I buy this betel leaf from Palong Khali market, in one bundle there are 160 pieces, I buy it for 80 taka and I sell it for 100 taka (1 Bangladeshi Taka = 0.012 US Dollar). Bangladeshi's and I sell for the same rate in the camp. Outside in the local market it is 80 taka per bundle. My problem is that I don't have money so I can't buy anything to eat, I can't buy fish to eat”, he said. (Photo by Hannah McKay/Reuters)
Details
27 Nov 2017 08:54:00
Meital Ben Ari, a co-founder of “Freedom Farm” pats Gary, a sheep with leg braces, at the farm which serves as a refuge for mostly disabled animals in Moshav Olesh, Israel on March 7, 2019. (Photo by Nir Elias/Reuters)

Meital Ben Ari, a co-founder of “Freedom Farm” pats Gary, a sheep with leg braces, at the farm which serves as a refuge for mostly disabled animals in Moshav Olesh, Israel on March 7, 2019. (Photo by Nir Elias/Reuters)
Details
15 Mar 2019 00:03:00
A worker holds the head of a fox while killing it with electricity for its fur at a fox farm in Nanzhuang village, Shandong province, China, December 11, 2015. There are over 60 households in the village still raising foxes, raccoon dogs and other animals for the fur trade. China is the world's largest fur producer and exporter, according to state media. (Photo by William Hong/Reuters)

A worker holds the head of a fox while killing it with electricity for its fur at a fox farm in Nanzhuang village, Shandong province, China, December 11, 2015. There are over 60 households in the village still raising foxes, raccoon dogs and other animals for the fur trade. China is the world's largest fur producer and exporter, according to state media. (Photo by William Hong/Reuters)
Details
16 Dec 2015 08:03:00
Bodie, Mono County, California. Gold was discovered at Bodie in 1859 (just after the initial California gold rush) and it went from mining camp to boomtown. Its decline began in 1880, when word spread of new boomtowns elsewhere. The Standard Consolidated Mine closed in 1913, and four years later the Bodie Railway was abandoned. By 1940 the population was down to 40. Today, Bodie is maintained in a state of arrested decay as a visitor attraction. (Photo by Alamy Stock Photo)

Kieron Connolly’s new book of photographs of more than 100 once-busy and often elegant buildings gives an idea of how the world might look if humankind disappeared. Here: Bodie, Mono County, California. Gold was discovered at Bodie in 1859 (just after the initial California gold rush) and it went from mining camp to boomtown. Its decline began in 1880, when word spread of new boomtowns elsewhere. The Standard Consolidated Mine closed in 1913, and four years later the Bodie Railway was abandoned. By 1940 the population was down to 40. Today, Bodie is maintained in a state of arrested decay as a visitor attraction. (Photo by Alamy Stock Photo)
Details
07 Sep 2016 09:50:00
Japanese children wear loincloths as they splash about in freezing cold water during Saidaiji Naked Festival, at Saidaiji Temple

“A Hadaka Matsuri (“Naked Festival”) is a type of Japanese festival, or matsuri, in which participants wear a minimum amount of clothing; usually just a Japanese loincloth (called fundoshi), sometimes with a short happi coat, and rarely completely naked. Whatever the clothing, it is considered to be above vulgar, or everyday, undergarments, and on the level of holy Japanese shrine attire. Naked festivals are held in dozens of places throughout Japan every year, usually in the summer or winter. The most famous festival is held in Okayama, where the festival originated. Every year, over 9,000 men participate in this festival”. – Wikipedia

Photo: Japanese men wear loincloths as they splash about in freezing cold water during Saidaiji Naked Festival, at Saidaiji Temple on February 18, 2012 in Okayama, Japan. (Photo by Buddhika Weerasinghe/Getty Images)
Details
19 Feb 2012 12:18:00