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A visiter is attracted by the chairs covered with solar panels at the factory of Yingli Green Energy Holding Company, also known as Yingli Solar, on June 20, 2011 in Baoding city of Hebei Province, China. According to a report by the International Energy Agency (IEA), China overtook America as the world' s largest energy consumer in 2010. New energy industries are becoming even more important than in the past. (Photo by Feng Li/Getty Images)
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21 Jun 2011 10:50:00
Shi Yongxin, abbot of the Shaolin Temple, works on the computer

“The popularity of the Internet in China has driven the explosive growth of profitable Web companies and made fortunes for some Chinese entrepreneurs despite government controls on what the public can see online. The number of mainland Internet users rose to 513 million in December, up 12 percent from a year earlier, the government-sanctioned China Internet Network Information Center said”. – AP Business Writer

Photo: Shi Yongxin, abbot of the Shaolin Temple, works on the computer April 8, 2005 in Dengfeng, Henan Province, China. (Photo by Cancan Chu/Getty Images)
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16 Jan 2012 13:19:00


Student, Shoukria positions a stone for cutting at the Turquoise Mountain Gem cutting class on May 18, 2011, in Kabul, Afghanistan. The mineral resources of Afghanistan are relatively unexplored even with Afghanistan's mineral wealth of coal, copper, gold and iron ore, with precious and semiprecious stones, including high-quality emerald, lapis lazuli, red garnet and ruby. Given the country's remote and rugged terrain, on-going instability plus an inadequate infrastructure and transportation means that mining is still difficult. While many are trying to bring positive changes, Afghanistan's mining industry uses unregulated, primitive methods and outdated equipment. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
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22 May 2011 09:11:00
Salt-resistant plants grow in sand made up of small fish bones on the shore of the Salton Sea before sunrise in an area where a controversial development would create a new town for nearly 40,000 people on the northwest shore of the biggest lake in California, the Salton Sea

Salt-resistant plants grow in sand made up of small fish bones on the shore of the Salton Sea before sunrise in an area where a controversial development would create a new town for nearly 40,000 people on the northwest shore of the biggest lake in California, the Salton Sea, on March 21, 2012 south of Mecca, California. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
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22 Mar 2012 11:32:00


Apple CEO Steve Jobs delivers the keynote address at the 2011 Apple World Wide Developers Conference at the Moscone Center on June 6, 2011 in San Francisco, California. Apple CEO Steve Jobs returned from sick leave to introduce Apple's new iCloud storage system and the next versions of Apple's iOS and Mac OSX. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
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07 Jun 2011 09:11:00
Photographers: Julien Mauve. Back To Childhood

“Julien Mauve is a Paris based professional web designer, front-end developer and content manager who loves innovation, experimentation and creation. Julien has taken up photography as a hobby. His collection Back to Childhood is all about bringing the long lost memories of early days into the adult life. How he came about that idea? Julien stumbled upon some of his old toys in his grandpa’s attic and felt a connection to every single one of them. Each toy brought back a fond memory”.
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06 Apr 2012 20:05:00
A picture made available on 17 September 2014 shows extreme athletes resting in hammocks on webbings stretched between rocks during the International Highline Meeting in Monte Piana, near Misurina, in the northern Italian Alps, Italy, 08 September 2014. (Photo by Balazs Mohai/EPA)

A picture made available on 17 September 2014 shows extreme athletes resting in hammocks on webbings stretched between rocks during the International Highline Meeting in Monte Piana, near Misurina, in the northern Italian Alps, Italy, 08 September 2014. (Photo by Balazs Mohai/EPA)
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20 Sep 2014 10:37:00


A Funnel Web spider is pictured at the Australian Reptile Park January 23, 2006 in Sydney, Australia. The Funnel Web is one of Australia's deadliest animals, with a venom that is packed with at least 40 different toxic proteins. A bite from a Funnel Web causes massive electrical over-load in the body's nervous system. Finally, fatalities occur from either heart attack or a pulmonary oedema, where the capillaries around the lungs begin to leak fluid and the patient effectively drowns. Death can come as quickly as two hours after a bite if no medical treatment is sought. Due to advances in anti-venom, there has been no death from a Funnel Web bite in Australia since 1980. Australia is home to some of the most deadly and poisonous animals on earth. (Photo by Ian Waldie/Getty Images)
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25 Apr 2011 07:49:00