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This July 2014 image provided by the Bureau of Land Management shows the interior of the Natural Trap Cave in north-central Wyoming. The cave holds the remains of tens of thousands of animals, including many now-extinct species, from the late Pleistocene period tens of thousands of years ago. Scientists have resumed digging for the first time in more than 30 years. (Photo by AP Photo/Bureau of Land Management)

This July 2014 image provided by the Bureau of Land Management shows the interior of the Natural Trap Cave in north-central Wyoming. The cave holds the remains of tens of thousands of animals, including many now-extinct species, from the late Pleistocene period tens of thousands of years ago. Scientists have resumed digging for the first time in more than 30 years. (Photo by AP Photo/Bureau of Land Management)
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10 Aug 2014 10:35:00
A thrill-seeking snapper has shot a powerful series of images featuring people carrying out everyday chores in front of giant storms. Benjamin Von Wong's surreal scenes include individuals ironing, barbecuing, playing video games and even sitting on the toilet – seemingly unaware of the threatening situations approaching. Here: Models pose in front of a storm in Cheyenne Wyoming. (Photo by Benjamin Von Wongs/Caters News)

A thrill-seeking snapper has shot a powerful series of images featuring people carrying out everyday chores in front of giant storms. Benjamin Von Wong's surreal scenes include individuals ironing, barbecuing, playing video games and even sitting on the toilet – seemingly unaware of the threatening situations approaching. The project was initiated to raise awareness about climate change, and the the storms appearing across six different states in the U.S. Von Wong, 29, started the project in Colorado, before traveling to South Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, North Dakota and Nebraska for the unusual images. Here: Models pose in front of a storm in Cheyenne Wyoming. (Photo by Benjamin Von Wongs/Caters News)
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08 Dec 2015 08:02:00
View of the “Sunset Lake” hot spring with it's unique colors caused by brown, orange and yellow algae-like bacteria called Thermophiles, that thrive in the cooling water turning the vivid aqua-blues to a murkier greenish brown, in the Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming on June 1, 2011. (Photo by Mark Ralston/AFP Photo)

View of the “Sunset Lake” hot spring with it's unique colors caused by brown, orange and yellow algae-like bacteria called Thermophiles, that thrive in the cooling water turning the vivid aqua-blues to a murkier greenish brown, in the Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming on June 1, 2011. Yellowstone National Park, was established by the U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Grant on March 1, 1872. The park is located primarily in the U.S. state of Wyoming, though it also extends into Montana and Idaho and was the first national park in the world. It is known for its wildlife and its many geothermal features, especially the Old Faithful Geyser. (Photo by Mark Ralston/AFP Photo)
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06 Apr 2014 08:02:00
Cassandra Cantu shields her 7-week-old puppy Kamala from the snow as she walks with friends in the Bear Creek Dog Park in Colorado Springs, Colo., Sunday, May 11, 2014. A spring storm that has brought over a foot of snow to parts of Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska and thunderstorms and tornadoes to the Midwest was slowing down travelers and left some without power Monday morning. (Photo by Mark Reis/AP Photo/The Gazette)

Cassandra Cantu shields her 7-week-old puppy Kamala from the snow as she walks with friends in the Bear Creek Dog Park in Colorado Springs, Colo., Sunday, May 11, 2014. A spring storm that has brought over a foot of snow to parts of Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska and thunderstorms and tornadoes to the Midwest was slowing down travelers and left some without power Monday morning. (Photo by Mark Reis/AP Photo/The Gazette)
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13 May 2014 10:41:00
Jassen Todorov, 40, from San Francisco is a professor of music at San Francisco State University, but he took to helicoptering in his spare time. While he was content to keep the panoramic views he witnessed to himself, Todorov has now paired his passion for flying with photography to capture some of the United States’ undiscovered vistas. Here: Grand Prismatic Spring, Yellowstone, Wyoming. (Photo by Jassen Todorov/Caters News)

Jassen Todorov, 40, from San Francisco is a professor of music at San Francisco State University, but he took to helicoptering in his spare time. While he was content to keep the panoramic views he witnessed to himself, Todorov has now paired his passion for flying with photography to capture some of the United States’ undiscovered vistas. Here: Grand Prismatic Spring, Yellowstone, Wyoming. (Photo by Jassen Todorov/Caters News)
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28 Dec 2015 08:06:00
Supercell in Minnesota, near Browerville, Minnesota in 2014. (Photo by Camille Seaman/Caters News)

These stunning images show the phwoar-some power of some of Americas most extreme weather. Camille Seaman’s wondrous work features huge super cells, crashing lightning and gale-force winds. The roaming photographer has chased storms across the US from Iowa to Wyoming and from Minnesota to Texas. Her favorite places to chase are Kansas, Nebraska and South Dakota – notorious hotspots for spectacular storms. Here: Supercell in Minnesota, near Browerville, Minnesota in 2014. (Photo by Camille Seaman/Caters News)
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26 Jan 2015 12:10:00
Photographer David Kingham created this composite image from 23 photos on August 12, 2012. He writes, “Last night I went out to Snowy Range in Wyoming in search of dark skies for the Perseid meteor shower.”. (Photo by David Kingham)

Starting on Monday, August 12, Perseid meteors will streak across the summer sky for a couple of nights, offering casual stargazers and serious nighttime photographers a chance to capture a glimpse of the annual meteor shower. Photo: Photographer David Kingham created this composite image from 23 photos on August 12, 2012. (Photo by David Kingham)
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08 Aug 2013 12:50:00
A photographer has weathered some of America's most violent storms to capture these stunning snaps. Storm chaser Mike Mezeul II, 30, has traveled all over the US to shoot the likes of mammoth thunderstorms and surreal cloud patterns. His incredible collection of storm images are the result of more than 15 years of photography and thousands of miles of travel. (Photo by Mike Mezeul II/Caters News)

A photographer has weathered some of America's most violent storms to capture these stunning snaps. Storm chaser Mike Mezeul II, 30, has traveled all over the US to shoot the likes of mammoth thunderstorms and surreal cloud patterns. His incredible collection of storm images are the result of more than 15 years of photography and thousands of miles of travel. Here: Mike waiting for the storm at Cheyenne, Wyoming, June 2014. (Photo by Mike Mezeul II/Caters News)
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07 Dec 2014 11:21:00