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A milk custard bun made to resemble one of the popular Japanese “Kobitos” characters is squeezed during a display for the photographer at Dim Sum Icon restaurant in Hong Kong, China July 25, 2016. A dim sum restaurant in Hong Kong encourages diners to play with their food, and the result will either disgust or delight you. At Dim Sum Icon customers can squeeze a strange creature to poo or vomit on their plate before eating it. Hungry punters poke a hole into the mouth – or the rear – of the dim sum with a chopstick, squeeze it and watch the brown or white cream ooze out. (Photo by Bobby Yip/Reuters)

A milk custard bun made to resemble one of the popular Japanese “Kobitos” characters is squeezed during a display for the photographer at Dim Sum Icon restaurant in Hong Kong, China July 25, 2016. A dim sum restaurant in Hong Kong encourages diners to play with their food, and the result will either disgust or delight you. At Dim Sum Icon customers can squeeze a strange creature to poo or vomit on their plate before eating it. Hungry punters poke a hole into the mouth – or the rear – of the dim sum with a chopstick, squeeze it and watch the brown or white cream ooze out. The unique dim sums are made with a face to resemble Japanese Kobitos characters. (Photo by Bobby Yip/Reuters)
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31 Jul 2016 11:25:00
Photographer Emily Dryden and sculptor/actor Zahydé Pietri combine theatricality and organic produce to compose the photographs for their series Fresh Faces. The portraits are made from a wide range of fruit and vegetables and aim to highlight humanity’s diversity – Pietri is from Puerto Rico and Dryden is from New York. Each face has its own name and identity: “We have stories for them, which you can see in the expressions”, says Dryden, “but we decided to keep them to ourselves. We didn’t want to spoil that”. (Photo by Emily Dryden and Zahydé Pietri/The Guardian)

Photographer Emily Dryden and sculptor/actor Zahydé Pietri combine theatricality and organic produce to compose the photographs for their series Fresh Faces. The portraits are made from a wide range of fruit and vegetables and aim to highlight humanity’s diversity – Pietri is from Puerto Rico and Dryden is from New York. Each face has its own name and identity: “We have stories for them, which you can see in the expressions”, says Dryden, “but we decided to keep them to ourselves. We didn’t want to spoil that”. (Photo by Emily Dryden and Zahydé Pietri/The Guardian)
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25 Jul 2016 11:08:00
Visitors at the National Zoo check out a parrotfish made from found waste from the ocean in Washington, DC on May 23, 2016. The artwork can be seen at the National Zoo until September 5th. (Photo by Keith Lane/The Washington Post)

Visitors at the National Zoo check out a parrotfish made from found waste from the ocean in Washington, DC on May 23, 2016. The artwork can be seen at the National Zoo until September 5th. (Photo by Keith Lane/The Washington Post)
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25 May 2016 13:11:00
A miniature sculpture in the shape of a home, created by self-taught artist Jadranko Djordjevic on a graphite pencil, is seen in Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina April 26, 2016. (Photo by Dado Ruvic/Reuters)

A miniature sculpture in the shape of a home, created by self-taught artist Jadranko Djordjevic on a graphite pencil, is seen in Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina April 26, 2016. (Photo by Dado Ruvic/Reuters)
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27 Apr 2016 09:57:00
Glass Sculpture By Scott Bisson

Scott Bisson of Quantum Creative Glass was first fascinated by the medium in high school chemistry class, at age seventeen. Since then, he has studied with five different masters, as well as at the world renowned Pilchuck School with Robert A. Mickelson, and has met and observed Dante Marioni, William Morris, and Peter Novotney.
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06 Apr 2016 15:44:00
An elephant with plants of parsley, rosemary, tamarind and coconut boulders. (Photo by Julia Wimmerlin/Caters News)

If you think you are looking at stunning sunset safari photographs, think again. From a herd of elephants trailing the savanna at sunset to a crocodile hungrily engulfing a baby impala, amazingly these clever pictures are actually made using nothing but props, toy animals and vegetables. Julia Wimmerlin has always dreamed of going on safari and found a way to channel her dream in a seriously creative way. Here: An elephant with plants of parsley, rosemary, tamarind and coconut boulders. (Photo by Julia Wimmerlin/Caters News)
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29 Mar 2016 11:36:00
Frander Arroyo, select wings of butterflies at Blue Morpho Butterfly House in Alajuela, Costa Rica, March 10, 2016. According to Arroyo, owner of Blue Morpho Butterfly House, he collects dead butterflies from his garden to mount as handicraft like earrings, necklaces, paintings and rings for export with prices ranging from $12 to $16 a piece. (Photo by Juan Carlos Ulate/Reuters)

Frander Arroyo, select wings of butterflies at Blue Morpho Butterfly House in Alajuela, Costa Rica, March 10, 2016. According to Arroyo, owner of Blue Morpho Butterfly House, he collects dead butterflies from his garden to mount as handicraft like earrings, necklaces, paintings and rings for export with prices ranging from $12 to $16 a piece. (Photo by Juan Carlos Ulate/Reuters)
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12 Mar 2016 14:29:00
A museum employee views “Details of Renaissance Paintings (Sandro Botticelli, Birth of Venus, 1482)” by Andy Warhol at the Victoria and Albert museum in London, Britain, March 2, 2016.  The piece forms part of “Botticelli Reimagined”, an exhibition exploring the ways artists have responded to the artistic legacy of the fifteenth century artist Sandro Botticelli, and including over fifty artworks by Botticelli himself. (Photo by Toby Melville/Reuters)

A museum employee views “Details of Renaissance Paintings (Sandro Botticelli, Birth of Venus, 1482)” by Andy Warhol at the Victoria and Albert museum in London, Britain, March 2, 2016. The piece forms part of “Botticelli Reimagined”, an exhibition exploring the ways artists have responded to the artistic legacy of the fifteenth century artist Sandro Botticelli, and including over fifty artworks by Botticelli himself. (Photo by Toby Melville/Reuters)
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03 Mar 2016 11:08:00