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Students from Vida Nueva School present their dinosaur robot built with recycled materials during the annual robotics fair supported by the Bolivian Education Ministry in La Paz, August 10, 2015. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

Students from Vida Nueva School present their dinosaur robot built with recycled materials during the annual robotics fair supported by the Bolivian Education Ministry in La Paz, August 10, 2015. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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11 Aug 2015 14:10:00
A woman (C) shops for an offering at the witch doctor's street in La Paz, July 31, 2015. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

A woman (C) shops for an offering at the witch doctor's street in La Paz, July 31, 2015. According to Andean culture, the all the month of August is a time to give offerings to “Pachamama” to give thanks for their farms and health. The Aymaras use coca leaves, candies, animal fat, llama fetuses, some dried fruits, powdered minerals and alcohol during these rituals. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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02 Aug 2015 12:27:00
A woman looks at La Paz city from the Jacha Qhatu cable car station in El Alto, July 23, 2015. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

A woman looks at La Paz city from the Jacha Qhatu cable car station in El Alto, July 23, 2015. Bolivia already has the largest urban cable car system in the world. Now the booming country is tripling the size of the network and will soon have nine lines whizzing above the administrative capital of La Paz. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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28 Jul 2015 12:50:00
In this February 11, 2105 photo, 72-year-old Aurea Murillo prepares to make a pass during a handball match among elderly Aymara indigenous women in El Alto, Bolivia. Dozens of traditional Aymara grandmothers ease many of the aches and pains of aging by practicing a sport that is decidedly untraditional in Bolivia: team handball. (Photo by Juan Karita/AP Photo)

In this February 11, 2105 photo, 72-year-old Aurea Murillo prepares to make a pass during a handball match among elderly Aymara indigenous women in El Alto, Bolivia. Dozens of traditional Aymara grandmothers ease many of the aches and pains of aging by practicing a sport that is decidedly untraditional in Bolivia: team handball. (Photo by Juan Karita/AP Photo)
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27 Feb 2015 19:34:00
A member of the “Morenada Los Cocanis” group dances during the Carnival parade in Oruro February 14, 2015. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

A member of the “Morenada Los Cocanis” group dances during the Carnival parade in Oruro February 14, 2015. Thousands of dancers and tourists attend the carnival celebrations in Oruro, south of La Paz. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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15 Feb 2015 14:25:00
A woman sells statues of the Ekeko, god of fortune, at the traditional “Alasitas” fair in La Paz January 24, 2015. During the fair, Bolivians buy miniature versions of goods like cars, money and houses they would like to own in real life during the year. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

A woman sells statues of the Ekeko, god of fortune, at the traditional “Alasitas” fair in La Paz January 24, 2015. During the fair, Bolivians buy miniature versions of goods like cars, money and houses they would like to own in real life during the year. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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25 Jan 2015 09:59:00
Bolivia's president Evo Morales holds his scared staffs of power during a blessing by Aymaran spiritual guides, in a traditional ceremony at the archeological site Tiwanaku, Bolivia, Wednesday, January 21, 2015. Morales is set to begin a new term Thursday, that will make him the Andean nation's longest-serving leader, riding high on a wave of unprecedented growth and stability. (Photo by Juan Karita/AP Photo)

Bolivia's president Evo Morales holds his scared staffs of power during a blessing by Aymaran spiritual guides, in a traditional ceremony at the archeological site Tiwanaku, Bolivia, Wednesday, January 21, 2015. Morales is set to begin a new term Thursday, that will make him the Andean nation's longest-serving leader, riding high on a wave of unprecedented growth and stability. (Photo by Juan Karita/AP Photo)
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22 Jan 2015 13:38:00
Aymara witchdoctor Ricardo Quispe, also called “Lord of the Lake”, throws coca leaves during a ritual to predict the future, at the witches market of El Alto, on the outskirts of La Paz, December 31, 2014. Dozens of witch doctors tend to a warren of stalls in El Alto, making offerings to give thanks, to promise luck at work or in love, or to call up spirits and banish curses at the end of the year. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

Aymara witchdoctor Ricardo Quispe, also called “Lord of the Lake”, throws coca leaves during a ritual to predict the future, at the witches market of El Alto, on the outskirts of La Paz, December 31, 2014. Dozens of witch doctors tend to a warren of stalls in El Alto, making offerings to give thanks, to promise luck at work or in love, or to call up spirits and banish curses at the end of the year. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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01 Jan 2015 14:05:00