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Todeng died in 2009. A young relative of his, Sam, lights him a cigarette and changes his glasses. (Photo by Claudio Sieber Photography/The Guardian)

For the Torajan people of Indonesia, death is part of a spiritual journey: families keep the mummified remains of their deceased relatives in their homes for years – and traditionally invite them to join for lunch on a daily basis – before they are eventually buried. Here: Todeng died in 2009. A young relative of his, Sam, lights him a cigarette and changes his glasses. (Photo by Claudio Sieber Photography/The Guardian)
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14 Oct 2017 09:34:00
Miners pulling up lazy tourists to the rim of Kawah Ijen (Ijen Volcano), East Java, Indonesia on September 21, 2017. They will earn as much as they would bring down a load of sulfur. Nomadic Explorer, Cultural Lifestyle Photographer Claudio Sieber captured striking images of miners working at Ijen volcanic range in East Java, Indonesia. The sulphur miners risk their lives daily as they climb the active volcano carrying heavy loads, which they sell to sugar refineries. Shortly after midnight curious tourists are flocking in hundreds through the gate of Ijen's foothills to be right on time, driven by the images others took before them. Kawah Ijen is the one of the world's largest acidic volcanic crater lake; famous for its turquoise color as well as the unreal atmosphere it offers during darkness. A dusty path zigzags 3 kilometers up to the crater rim. This doesn't mean anything challenging; in particular, special sights have to be deserved anyway. The irritating smell of sulfur announces the near of the crater's existence. Arriving on the crater's rim the reward for the torture becomes visible. Blue fire darts its tongues through the fumes of sulfur dioxide. Somehow, the spectacle isn't as romantic as expected, since it is also the rough working space of approx. 150 sulfur miners who start their shift at 1 am. Lately, harvesting the abundance of devil's gold received international attention. This did obviously not really improve a miner's lifestyle; neither did it contribute to a better wage. (Photo by Claudio Sieber/Barcroft Images)

Miners pulling up lazy tourists to the rim of Kawah Ijen (Ijen Volcano), East Java, Indonesia on September 21, 2017. They will earn as much as they would bring down a load of sulfur. Nomadic Explorer, Cultural Lifestyle Photographer Claudio Sieber captured striking images of miners working at Ijen volcanic range in East Java, Indonesia. The sulphur miners risk their lives daily as they climb the active volcano carrying heavy loads, which they sell to sugar refineries. (Photo by Claudio Sieber/Barcroft Images)
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02 Oct 2017 08:31:00
A farmer seen harvesting his crops while Mount Sinabung spewing out volcanic ash on July 4, 2017 in North Sumatera, Indonesia. The increased volume of lava dome that reaches one million eight hundred cubic meters, said volcanologist, through radio communications, do not dampen the activities of the people around sinabung, such as farming, harvesting their crops, picking up objects that are still left behind, or just take a picture while walking around near mount Sinabung. (Photo by Sabirin Manurung/Pacific Press/Barcroft Images)

A farmer seen harvesting his crops while Mount Sinabung spewing out volcanic ash on July 4, 2017 in North Sumatera, Indonesia. The increased volume of lava dome that reaches one million eight hundred cubic meters, said volcanologist, through radio communications, do not dampen the activities of the people around sinabung, such as farming, harvesting their crops, picking up objects that are still left behind, or just take a picture while walking around near mount Sinabung. (Photo by Sabirin Manurung/Pacific Press/Barcroft Images)
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06 Aug 2017 07:50:00
An Acehnese women is whipped in front of the public for violating sharia law in Pidie District on 14 July 2017, Aceh, Indonesia. (Photo by Oviyandi/Barcroft Images)

An Acehnese women is whipped in front of the public for violating sharia law in Pidie District on 14 July 2017, Aceh, Indonesia. Aceh is the only one province in Indonesia which has implemented sharia law, which bans sexual contact between men and women who are not married. Whipping is one form of punishment imposed in Aceh for violating Islamic sharia law. (Photo by Oviyandi/Barcroft Images)
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15 Jul 2017 08:18:00
Dancers wait at backstage as they prepare for a dance performance during the Bali Arts Festival in Bali, Indonesia, Wednesday, June 21, 2017. The resort island of Bali is holding a month-long annual Bali Arts Festival from June 10 to July 8. (Photo by Firdia Lisnawati/AP Photo)

Dancers wait at backstage as they prepare for a dance performance during the Bali Arts Festival in Bali, Indonesia, Wednesday, June 21, 2017. The resort island of Bali is holding a month-long annual Bali Arts Festival from June 10 to July 8. (Photo by Firdia Lisnawati/AP Photo)
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22 Jun 2017 08:51:00
This picture taken on May 23, 2017 shows visitors posing for photos along a path at an Indonesian hamlet dubbed “the rainbow village” in Semarang, central Java, that has become an internet sensation and attracting hordes of visitors. (Photo by Suryo Wibowo/AFP Photo)

This picture taken on May 23, 2017 shows visitors posing for photos along a path at an Indonesian hamlet dubbed “the rainbow village” in Semarang, central Java, that has become an internet sensation and attracting hordes of visitors. (Photo by Suryo Wibowo/AFP Photo)
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03 Jun 2017 06:26:00
An operator adjusts a film projector during a wedding party in Bogor, Indonesia, February 18, 2017. (Photo by Reuters/Beawiharta)

An operator adjusts a film projector during a wedding party in Bogor, Indonesia, February 18, 2017. Indonesian entrepreneur Kamaluddin loves the gritty look of old 35-millimeter film so much that he spends most of his nights screening vintage movies at weddings and parties around Jakarta, the capital. (Photo by Reuters/Beawiharta)
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30 May 2017 08:20:00
This picture taken on February 18, 2017 shows a customer holding a crested black macaque in Tomohon market in northern Sulawesi, Indonesia. (Photo by Bay Ismoyo/AFP Photo)

This picture taken on February 18, 2017 shows a customer holding a crested black macaque in Tomohon market in northern Sulawesi, Indonesia. Authorities and activists are stepping up efforts to persuade villagers on Sulawesi island to stop consuming the critically endangered crested black macaques, one of many exotic creatures that form part of the local indigenous community' s diet. The macaque' s meat is prized by the ethnic Minahasan people, a largely Christian group in the world' s most populous Muslim- majority country, who have no reservation about eating exotic animals, unlike Indonesia' s Islamic communities. (Photo by Bay Ismoyo/AFP Photo)
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04 Apr 2017 10:01:00