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“The Salmon Catchers”. Terrestrial Wildlife. To capture this view of a mother grizzly bear and her cub, photographer Peter Mather set up a camera trap on a log that he knew the bears tended to traverse while fishing for salmon, in the Yukon River watershed in Canada. (Photo by Peter Mather/BigPicture Natural World Photography Competition 2017)

The fourth annual BigPicture Natural World Photography Competition aims to celebrate the diversity of life on Earth, and encourages people to protect and conserve it. Here: “The Salmon Catchers”. Terrestrial Wildlife. To capture this view of a mother grizzly bear and her cub, photographer Peter Mather set up a camera trap on a log that he knew the bears tended to traverse while fishing for salmon, in the Yukon River watershed in Canada. (Photo by Peter Mather/BigPicture Natural World Photography Competition 2017)
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02 Jul 2017 07:25:00
The National Geographic Photo Ark is a travelling exhibition of photographer Joel Sartore’s quest to create a photo archive of biodiversity around the world. So far, Sartore has captured studio portraits of more than 6,000 species – a number that he hopes to double. On 1 July, the ark will open at Melbourne zoo – the first time it has been exhibited in the southern hemisphere. More than 50 portraits will be on display, including many of Australian endangered animals being protected by programs at the zoo itself. These captions have been edited from text supplied by Melbourne zoo. Here: Barking owl. So-named because its call sounds like a barking dog, these birds are native to Australia, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. In Victoria they are listed as an endangered species, and in 2003 there were estimated to be fewer than 50 breeding pairs. The main threat to the species in Victoria is loss of habitat, especially large trees with hollows in which they can nest and on which many of their prey depend. Apart from a bark, they may utter a chilling scream when they feel threatened. (Photo by Joel Sartore/National Geographic Photo Ark/The Guardian)

The National Geographic Photo Ark is a travelling exhibition of photographer Joel Sartore’s quest to create a photo archive of biodiversity around the world. So far, Sartore has captured studio portraits of more than 6,000 species – a number that he hopes to double. On 1 July, the ark will open at Melbourne zoo – the first time it has been exhibited in the southern hemisphere. More than 50 portraits will be on display, including many of Australian endangered animals being protected by programs at the zoo itself. These captions have been edited from text supplied by Melbourne zoo. Here: Barking owl. (Photo by Joel Sartore/National Geographic Photo Ark/The Guardian)
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01 Jul 2017 07:45:00
Underwater pictures show the 23-year-old diver cosying up to a range of animals. (Photo by Amelia Klonaris/Mediadrumworld)

Dublin student beat depression by befriending sharks, stingrays and pigs in the Bahamas. Awesome underwater pictures show the 23-year-old diver cosying up to a range of animals including turtles, stingray and sharks. The sunny selfies were taken in the Bahamas by Stuart’s Cove dive instructor and native of the island, Amelia Klonaris – who beat depression by embracing her incredible beach paradise lifestyle. (Photo by Amelia Klonaris/Mediadrumworld)
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01 Jul 2017 07:38:00
A South China Tiger cub meets public at Guangzhou Zoo on June 22, 2017 in Guangzhou, Guangdong Province of China. Guangzhou Zoo boasts of the successful breeding of South China Tiger cub after 15 years. (Photo by VCG/VCG via Getty Images)

A South China Tiger cub meets public at Guangzhou Zoo on June 22, 2017 in Guangzhou, Guangdong Province of China. Guangzhou Zoo boasts of the successful breeding of South China Tiger cub after 15 years. (Photo by VCG/VCG via Getty Images)
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25 Jun 2017 06:57:00
Nutrias venture near the camera at the river Nidda in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, 15 June 2017. The rabbit sized animals are often confused with biebers by amateurs. (Photo by Boris Roessler/DPA)

Nutrias venture near the camera at the river Nidda in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, 15 June 2017. The rabbit sized animals are often confused with biebers by amateurs. (Photo by Boris Roessler/DPA)
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18 Jun 2017 03:24:00
In this May 17, 2017 photo, cowboy cook Odair Batista carries a case with food in Corumba, the Pantanal wetlands of Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil. Dressed with leather chaps on top of their jeans, stetson hats and a machete attached to their waists, before setting off, the men finish their breakfast with Terere, an herbal “mate” beverage served ice cold in an ox drinking horn. (Photo by Eraldo Peres/AP Photo)

In this May 17, 2017 photo, cowboy cook Odair Batista carries a case with food in Corumba, the Pantanal wetlands of Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil. Dressed with leather chaps on top of their jeans, stetson hats and a machete attached to their waists, before setting off, the men finish their breakfast with Terere, an herbal “mate” beverage served ice cold in an ox drinking horn. (Photo by Eraldo Peres/AP Photo)
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12 Jun 2017 09:00:00
Gray whale feeding at the surface and showing it's baleen. (Photo by Christopher Swann/Biosphoto)

Gray whale feeding at the surface and showing it's baleen. (Photo by Christopher Swann/Biosphoto)
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11 Jun 2017 07:23:00
A scorpion crawls out of the mouth of Thailand's Scorpion Queen and Ripley's Ambassador Kanchana Kaetkaew (also spelled Kanjana Ketkaew), at the Ripley's Believe it or Not museum in Pattaya city, Chonburi province, Thailand, 03 June 2017. (Photo by Diego Azubel/EPA)

A scorpion crawls out of the mouth of Thailand's Scorpion Queen and Ripley's Ambassador Kanchana Kaetkaew (also spelled Kanjana Ketkaew), at the Ripley's Believe it or Not museum in Pattaya city, Chonburi province, Thailand, 03 June 2017. (Photo by Diego Azubel/EPA)
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06 Jun 2017 08:33:00