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Tsewang Dolma, 33, a farmer and housewife poses for a photograph in Matho, a village nestled high in the Indian Himalayas, India September 29, 2016. When asked how living in the world's fastest growing major economy had affected life, Dolma replied: “Our culture is spoiled now. We don't wear our traditional dress”. (Photo by Cathal McNaughton/Reuters)

Tsewang Dolma, 33, a farmer and housewife poses for a photograph in Matho, a village nestled high in the Indian Himalayas, India September 29, 2016. When asked how living in the world's fastest growing major economy had affected life, Dolma replied: “Our culture is spoiled now. We don't wear our traditional dress”. (Photo by Cathal McNaughton/Reuters)
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13 Oct 2016 11:32:00
Prayer flags fly at Namgyal Tsemo Monastery above the town of Leh in Ladakh, India September 24, 2016. (Photo by Cathal McNaughton/Reuters)

Prayer flags fly at Namgyal Tsemo Monastery above the town of Leh in Ladakh, India September 24, 2016. High in the Indian Himalayas, young novice monks in maroon robes take their lessons inside the 15th-century Thiksey monastery. (Photo by Cathal McNaughton/Reuters)
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06 Jan 2017 14:13:00
In this August 17, 2016, photo, from left to right, Chhering Chodom, 60, Tashi Yangzom, 50, Lobsang Chhering, 27, and Dorje Tandup, 58, drink milk tea on the side of the road. For centuries, the sleepy valley nestled in the Indian Himalayas remained a hidden Buddhist enclave forbidden to outsiders. Enduring the harsh year-round conditions of the high mountain desert, the people of Spiti Valley lived by a simple communal code – share the Earth's bounty, be hospitable to neighbors, and eschew greed and temptation at all turns. That's all starting to change, for better or worse. Since India began allowing its own citizens as well as outsiders to visit the valley in the early 1990s, tourism and trade have boomed. And the marks of modernization, such as solar panels, asphalt roads and concrete buildings, have begun to appear around some of the villages that dot the remote landscape at altitudes above 4,000 meters (13,000 feet). (Photo by Thomas Cytrynowicz/AP Photo)

In this August 17, 2016, photo, from left to right, Chhering Chodom, 60, Tashi Yangzom, 50, Lobsang Chhering, 27, and Dorje Tandup, 58, drink milk tea on the side of the road. For centuries, the sleepy valley nestled in the Indian Himalayas remained a hidden Buddhist enclave forbidden to outsiders. Enduring the harsh year-round conditions of the high mountain desert, the people of Spiti Valley lived by a simple communal code – share the Earth's bounty, be hospitable to neighbors, and eschew greed and temptation at all turns. That's all starting to change, for better or worse. (Photo by Thomas Cytrynowicz/AP Photo)
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15 Sep 2016 09:22:00
In this photograph taken on July 7, 2018, an Indian Buddhist monk plays with the wind amongst prayer flags on a hill overlooking Tnagyud Gompa monastery in Komik in Spiti Valley in the northern state of Himachal Pradesh. (Photo by Xavier Galiana/AFP Photo)

In this photograph taken on July 7, 2018, an Indian Buddhist monk plays with the wind amongst prayer flags on a hill overlooking Tnagyud Gompa monastery in Komik in Spiti Valley in the northern state of Himachal Pradesh. (Photo by Xavier Galiana/AFP Photo)
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10 Aug 2018 00:03:00
Twin Baby Red Pandas

Zookeeper Michael Horn holds up Kit and Kitty, the twin red pandas born in June on the first day of their introduction into their new enclosure at Tierpark Zoo on September 13, 2011 in Berlin, Germany. The red panda (Ailerus fulgens) is a rare mammal native to the eastern Himalayas and southwestern China. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
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14 Sep 2011 12:24:00


“The red panda (Ailurus fulgens, or shining-cat), is a small arboreal mammal native to the eastern Himalayas and southwestern China. It is the only species of the genus Ailurus. Slightly larger than a domestic cat, it has reddish-brown fur, a long, shaggy tail, and a waddling gait due to its shorter front legs. It feeds mainly on bamboo, but is omnivorous and may also eat eggs, birds, insects, and small mammals. It is a solitary animal, mainly active from dusk to dawn, and is largely sedentary during the day”. – Wikipedia

Photo: In this handout image provided by Taronga Zoo, Seba, a baby Red Panda, explores his new home at Taronga Zoo on April 7, 2011 in Sydney, Australia. The Red Panda cub was born at Christmas and is the 45th to be born at the zoo since 1977. (Photo by Peter Hardin/Taronga Zoo via Getty Images)
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07 Apr 2011 08:51:00
Screenshot of Krystle and Hernan, taken on a foot mounted GoPro. (Photo by Krystle Wright/Caters News)

“Daredevil photographer Krystle Wright suffered a catalogue of injuries after an accident on a shoot in Pakistan. The 26-year-old was left with internal bruising, tendon damage, two fractures, a torn ligament and 10 stitches above her eye following the horrific fall in the Himalayas. Wright took to the air on a dual paraglider and flew at a stomach-churning 18,000 feet to capture the incredible images. But as she neared the end of her trip Wright hit a bolder and blacked out following a bad take-off. The keen photographer, from Queensland, Australia, has travelled the world shooting some of the most awe-inspiring extreme sport stunts”. – Caters News. Photo: Screenshot of Krystle and Hernan, taken on a foot mounted GoPro. (Photo by Krystle Wright/Caters News)
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10 Dec 2013 07:45:00
Gravel Workmen of Chittagong, Bangladesh, by Faisal Azim. Gravel workmen look through a glass window at a gravel-crushing yard in Chittagong. Full of dust and sand, it is an extremely unhealthy environment for working, but still hundreds of people work here for their livelihoods. (Photo by Faisal Azim/2016 Atkins CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year)

From Tibetan monks playing basket ball with ice thawing high up in the Himalayas, to the pollution that hides behind the Taj Mahal, here’s pick from 60 exceptional environmental photographs, by photographers and filmmakers from 70 countries, that will go on show at the Royal Geographical Society in London from 29 June to 21 August. The winners will be announced on 28 June. Here: Gravel Workmen of Chittagong, Bangladesh, by Faisal Azim. Gravel workmen look through a glass window at a gravel-crushing yard in Chittagong. Full of dust and sand, it is an extremely unhealthy environment for working, but still hundreds of people work here for their livelihoods. (Photo by Faisal Azim/2016 Atkins CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year)
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01 Jun 2016 12:25:00