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A Thai Marine instructor drinks a cobra's raw blood after killing it as he gives instruction to US Marines and South Korean Marines during jungle survival training as part of the multinational joint military exercise Cobra Gold 2018 at a Force Reconnaissance Battalion camp in the Royal Thai Naval Base, Sattahip district, Chonburi province, Thailand, 19 February 2018. (Photo by Rungroj Yongrit/EPA/EFE)

A Thai Marine instructor drinks a cobra's raw blood after killing it as he gives instruction to US Marines and South Korean Marines during jungle survival training as part of the multinational joint military exercise Cobra Gold 2018 at a Force Reconnaissance Battalion camp in the Royal Thai Naval Base, Sattahip district, Chonburi province, Thailand, 19 February 2018. (Photo by Rungroj Yongrit/EPA/EFE)
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21 Feb 2018 00:01:00
In a military base in the Thai province of Chon Buri February 20 U.S. Marines Navy with Thailand began their studies in jungle survival. The event is held in joint military exercises “Cobra Gold 2013”. During a jungle survival program February 20, 2013 taught by Royal Thai Special Forces in Sannapit, Thailand, U.S. Marines learned to catch cobras and drink their fresh blood, not to mention eat forest insects and pull the heads off of chicken. The training was part of Operation Cobra Gold 13, the 32nd edition of international military exercises hosted by the Thai. According to a U.S. Marines press release, Cobra Gold is the largest exercise of its kind in Asia and incorporates troops from five other nations in addition to the U.S. and Thailand. The Daily Mail reports that the Marines were invited to experience the local custom of drinking cobra blood after being taught to catch and kill cobras in the wild. As CNN notes, Cobra blood is believed to be a panacea and aphrodiasic in parts of Southeast Asia. In Jakarta, vendors can earn over $100 a night selling shots of cobra blood mixed with liquor. (Photo by Pornchai Kittiwongsakul/AFP Photo)

During a jungle survival program February 20, 2013 taught by Royal Thai Special Forces in Sannapit, Thailand, U.S. Marines learned to catch cobras and drink their fresh blood, not to mention eat forest insects and pull the heads off of chicken. The training was part of Operation Cobra Gold 13, the 32nd edition of international military exercises hosted by the Thai. According to a U.S. Marines press release, Cobra Gold is the largest exercise of its kind in Asia and incorporates troops from five other nations in addition to the U.S. and Thailand. The Daily Mail reports that the Marines were invited to experience the local custom of drinking cobra blood after being taught to catch and kill cobras in the wild. As CNN notes, Cobra blood is believed to be a panacea and aphrodiasic in parts of Southeast Asia. In Jakarta, vendors can earn over $100 a night selling shots of cobra blood mixed with liquor. (Photo by Pornchai Kittiwongsakul/AFP Photo)
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23 Feb 2013 11:52:00
The Cobra JoyRide car charger by Cobra Electronics is displayed during a press event at The Venetian for the 2012 International Consumer Electronics Show

The Cobra JoyRide car charger by Cobra Electronics is displayed during a press event at The Venetian for the 2012 International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) January 8, 2012 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The JoyRide works with Android phones and can automatically trigger preset phone functions like enabling GPS or disabling Wi-Fi with the press of a single button. It will be available for USD 39 in the second quarter of 2012. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
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09 Jan 2012 12:39:00
Ravi Nath poses for a photograph with a cobra snake in Jogi Dera (Snake charmers settlement), in the village of Baghpur, in the central state of Uttar Pradesh, India November 10, 2016. (Photo by Adnan Abidi/Reuters)

Ravi Nath poses for a photograph with a cobra snake in Jogi Dera (Snake charmers settlement), in the village of Baghpur, in the central state of Uttar Pradesh, India November 10, 2016. An ancient tribe of snake charmers, known as Saperas, have thrived over the generations by catching venomous snakes and making them dance to their music. Snakes are revered by Hindus in India and snake charmers are considered the followers of Lord Shiva, the blue-skinned Hindu god who is usually portrayed wearing a king cobra around his neck. (Photo by Adnan Abidi/Reuters)
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26 Jan 2017 13:06:00
A gypsy man doing their traditional performance with a Cobra snack during the outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at Savar the outskirts of Capital Dhaka, Bangladesh on April 24, 2021. The river gypsies in Bangladesh locally known as “Bede” community. (Photo by Fatima-Tuj Johora/ZUMA Wire/Rex Features/Shutterstock)

A gypsy man doing their traditional performance with a Cobra snack during the outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at Savar the outskirts of Capital Dhaka, Bangladesh on April 24, 2021. The river gypsies in Bangladesh locally known as “Bede” community. (Photo by Fatima-Tuj Johora/ZUMA Wire/Rex Features/Shutterstock)
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20 May 2021 08:52:00
Assimilation By Dillon Marsh

Captured by South African photographer Dillon Marsh, these fantastic photographs depict the many designs employed by sociable weavers to build sturdy nests that are safe from intruders such as cobras and tree snakes. They are also nice cool during the day, and stay warm during cold desert nights. A University of Stellenbosch graduate, Marsh is currently interested in landscape photographer who seeks out anomalies that can be arranged in a photographic series. Assimilation depicts scores of intricate weaver’s nests atop utility poles in Southern Africa. Colonies of sociable weavers have been known to stay attached to one particular nest for up to 100 years, according to The San Diego Zoo.
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15 Feb 2014 14:47:00
A young Bengal tiger cub smuggled into the US and seized at the Mexico border is displayed for the media during Operation Jungle Book at the US Fish and Wildlife Service in Torrance, California on October 20, 2017. Operation Jungle Book, a law enforcement initiative led by the US Fish and Wildlife Service that targeted wildlife smuggling, resulting in federal criminal charges against defendants who allegedly participated in the illegal importation and/ or transportation of numerous animal species – including a tiger, monitor lizards, cobras, Asian “lucky” fish, exotic songbirds and several coral species. (Photo by Mark Ralston/AFP Photo)

A young Bengal tiger cub smuggled into the US and seized at the Mexico border is displayed for the media during Operation Jungle Book at the US Fish and Wildlife Service in Torrance, California on October 20, 2017. Operation Jungle Book, a law enforcement initiative led by the US Fish and Wildlife Service that targeted wildlife smuggling, resulting in federal criminal charges against defendants who allegedly participated in the illegal importation and/ or transportation of numerous animal species – including a tiger, monitor lizards, cobras, Asian “lucky” fish, exotic songbirds and several coral species. (Photo by Mark Ralston/AFP Photo)
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29 Oct 2017 08:30:00
Wunderpus larva. (Photo by Ace Wu/Caters News Agency)

Ace Wu searches the deep to photograph stunning underwater creatures. Against their predominantly black backdrops, Wu’s breathtaking subjects glow with sublime vibrancy. In one, a fearsome fish glares at the camera with rows of sharp teeth showing, while in another, a translucent octopus looks like an extraterrestrial. Here: Wunderpus larva. (Photo by Ace Wu/Caters News Agency)
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08 May 2018 00:01:00