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In this April 4, 2017 photo keeper German Alonso straps a leg prothesis to on the left leg of secretarybird Soeckchen (Sagittarius seprentarius) at the bird park in Walsrode, northern Germany. The prothesis was made in a 3D-printer after his left leg was amputated. (Photo by Philipp Schulze/DPA via AP Photo)

In this April 4, 2017 photo keeper German Alonso straps a leg prothesis to on the left leg of secretarybird Soeckchen (Sagittarius seprentarius) at the bird park in Walsrode, northern Germany. The prothesis was made in a 3D-printer after his left leg was amputated. (Photo by Philipp Schulze/DPA via AP Photo)
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11 Apr 2017 09:53:00
Wearing his new prosthetic legs Hero gets a taste of shrubbery Wednesday, May 21, 2014, in Houston. The abandoned calf rescued from a Virginia farm a year ago and brought to Texas after it nearly died is getting permanent prosthetics to replace back hooves that had to be amputated because of frostbite. (Photo by Pat Sullivan/AP Photo)

Wearing his new prosthetic legs Hero gets a taste of shrubbery Wednesday, May 21, 2014, in Houston. The abandoned calf rescued from a Virginia farm a year ago and brought to Texas after it nearly died is getting permanent prosthetics to replace back hooves that had to be amputated because of frostbite. (Photo by Pat Sullivan/AP Photo)
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25 May 2014 10:00:00
U.S. Air Force wounded warrior, Capt. Sarah Evans, jumps rope in a gym in San Antonio, Texas. Evans was diagnosed with cancer while deployed to Afghanistan and was medically evacuated back to the United States where her leg was amputated. (Photo by Master Sgt. Jeffrey Allen/U.S. Air Force)

U.S. Air Force wounded warrior, Capt. Sarah Evans, jumps rope in a gym in San Antonio, Texas. Evans was diagnosed with cancer while deployed to Afghanistan and was medically evacuated back to the United States where her leg was amputated. (Photo by Master Sgt. Jeffrey Allen/U.S. Air Force)
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26 Mar 2015 11:43:00
Dani tribeswoman smokes a cigarette and shows her amputated fingers in, Western New Guinea, Indonesia, August 2016. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)

Dani tribeswoman smokes a cigarette and shows her amputated fingers in, Western New Guinea, Indonesia, August 2016. Deep in the highlands of Western New Guinea, Indonesia, lives one of the world’s most isolated tribes. Known as the Dani people, the tribe was unwittingly discovered by American philanthropist, Richard Archbold, after an expedition in 1938. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)
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18 Nov 2016 11:03:00
A young man with an amputated leg poses for a photograph standing by his broken artificial limb in the rebel-controlled area of Maaret al-Numan town in Idlib province, Syria March 20, 2016. (Photo by Khalil Ashawi/Reuters)

A young man with an amputated leg poses for a photograph standing by his broken artificial limb in the rebel-controlled area of Maaret al-Numan town in Idlib province, Syria March 20, 2016. Two university students forced to interrupt their studies have learnt to make and fit hundreds of new limbs in the past four years in opposition-held areas of Syria. A mobile clinic operating from a truck has gone some way to improve access to treatment. While most patients are between 15 and 45, the clinic also helps children and the elderly with replacement limbs. (Photo by Khalil Ashawi/Reuters)
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16 Apr 2016 12:03:00
In this July 15, 2015 photo, Nepalese amputee victims Khendo Tamang, left, and Nirmala Pariyar, both 8, share a single pair of shoes at the Bir Trauma Center in Kathmandu, Nepal. After suffering serious leg wounds in Nepal's massive 2015 earthquake that killed and injured thousands, both girls were brought to the Bir Trauma Center in Kathmandu, to receive single leg amputations. Following their surgeries, Nirmala's relentless cheerfulness drew a still very depressed Khendo close and both found an inseparable friendship which has helped their emotional wounds heal. (Photo by Niranjan Shrestha/AP Photo)

In this July 15, 2015 photo, Nepalese amputee victims Khendo Tamang, left, and Nirmala Pariyar, both 8, share a single pair of shoes at the Bir Trauma Center in Kathmandu, Nepal. After suffering serious leg wounds in Nepal's massive 2015 earthquake that killed and injured thousands, both girls were brought to the Bir Trauma Center in Kathmandu, to receive single leg amputations. Following their surgeries, Nirmala's relentless cheerfulness drew a still very depressed Khendo close and both found an inseparable friendship which has helped their emotional wounds heal. (Photo by Niranjan Shrestha/AP Photo)
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23 Apr 2016 13:48:00
A girl asks a passerby for help to pay a medical bill as her father sits in his wheelchair in the Douma neighbourhood of Damascus Syria February 3, 2016. (Photo by Bassam Khabieh/Reuters)

Hadeel, 10, asks a passerby for help to pay a medical bill as her father Shahrour, 54, sits in his wheelchair in the Douma neighbourhood of Damascus Syria February 3, 2016. Shahrour said he developed diabetes at the beginning of the war in Syria. A lack of insulin led to his medical condition worsening and his right foot had to be amputated. Recently he also suffered a stroke that paralysed half his face. He and part of his extended family, a total of 18 people, live together and struggle to get by. (Photo by Bassam Khabieh/Reuters)
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12 Feb 2016 12:46:00
13-year-old Emmanuel Festo from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a plush toy that he says makes him feel safe at night and that he sleeps with, in New York's Staten Island, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. (Photo by Carlo Allegri/Reuters)

13-year-old Emmanuel Festo from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a plush toy that he says makes him feel safe at night and that he sleeps with, in New York's Staten Island, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. (Photo by Carlo Allegri/Reuters)
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03 Oct 2015 08:04:00