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Yenny Mamani "Marta la Altena", top, grabs Leonor Cordova "Angela la Simpatica" in a hold during a Bolivian wrestling Cholitas fight in Madrid, Spain, Thursday October 8, 2015. (Photo by Paul White/AP Photo)

Yenny Mamani "Marta la Altena", top, grabs Leonor Cordova "Angela la Simpatica" in a hold during a Bolivian wrestling Cholitas fight in Madrid, Spain, Thursday October 8, 2015. (Photo by Paul White/AP Photo)
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11 Oct 2015 08:08:00
Alicia Vargas, 23, a performer from the Urus Diablada group, tied the laces of her boots before a practice ahead of Carnival in Oruro, Bolivia February 5, 2016. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

Alicia Vargas, 23, a performer from the Urus Diablada group, tied the laces of her boots before a practice ahead of Carnival in Oruro, Bolivia February 5, 2016. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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08 Feb 2016 11:15:00
A woman holds a skull during a “Dia de los natitas” (Day of the Skull) ceremony at the Cementerio General of La Paz. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

A woman holds a skull during a “Dia de los natitas” (Day of the Skull) ceremony at the Cementerio General of La Paz. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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10 Nov 2013 06:59:00
A porter stands at the bottom of the Illimani mountain, on the outskirts of La Paz, Bolivia, April 16, 2016. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

A porter stands at the bottom of the Illimani mountain, on the outskirts of La Paz, Bolivia, April 16, 2016. For years, Lydia Huayllas, 48, has worked as a cook at base camps and mountain-climbing refuges on the steep, glacial slopes of Huayna Potosi, a 19,974-foot (6,088-meter) Andean peak outside of La Paz, Bolivia. But two years ago, she and 10 other Aymara indigenous women, ages 42 to 50, who also worked as porters and cooks for mountaineers, put on crampons – spikes fixed to a boot for climbing – under their wide traditional skirts and started to do their own climbing. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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22 Apr 2016 12:33:00
Aymara dolls are seen during the “Alasitas” fair, where people buy miniature versions of goods they hope to acquire in real life, in La Paz, Bolivia, January 24, 2017. Shoppers fill their baskets with miniature versions of things they desire – everything from cars, houses computers – to give to Ekeko the God of abundance, in the hope he will being therm good fortune. And it is all carried out with a priest’s blessing. Originally, the Festival of Alasitas was a celebration by farmers praying for plentiful crops.Today, the meaning amounts to the same only locals hope for more material goods. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

Aymara dolls are seen during the “Alasitas” fair, where people buy miniature versions of goods they hope to acquire in real life, in La Paz, Bolivia, January 24, 2017. Shoppers fill their baskets with miniature versions of things they desire – everything from cars, houses computers – to give to Ekeko the God of abundance, in the hope he will being therm good fortune. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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26 Jan 2017 12:56:00
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29 Jun 2015 12:06:00
Coca growers chew coca leaves during a celebration for the reincorporation of Bolivia to the UN Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs in La Paz on January 14, 2013. "The coca leaf is not any more seen as cocaine (..), it is a victory of our identity" said Bolivian President Evo Morales. AFP PHOTO/Jorge Bernal        (Photo credit should read JORGE BERNAL/AFP/Getty Images)

Coca growers chew coca leaves during a celebration for the reincorporation of Bolivia to the UN Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs in La Paz on January 14, 2013. “The coca leaf is not any more seen as cocaine (...), it is a victory of our identity” said Bolivian President Evo Morales. (Photo by Jorge Bernal/AFP Photo)
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15 Jan 2013 10:16:00
A Bolivian Squirrel monkey plays with a toy football at London Zoo

A Bolivian Squirrel monkey plays with a toy football at London Zoo on August 18, 2011 in London, England. Male monkey Bounty has fathered eleven baby monkeys in the last three years since his arrival, enough to make up a football team. His latest offspring named Rolo was the eleventh and arrived last month. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
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19 Aug 2011 09:52:00