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“The saguaro (scientific name Carnegiea gigantea) is a large, tree-sized cactus species in the monotypic genus Carnegiea. It is native to the Sonoran Desert in the U.S. state of Arizona, the Mexican state of Sonora, a small part of Baja California in the San Felipe Desert and an extremely small area of California, U.S. The saguaro blossom is the State Wildflower of Arizona”. – Wikipedia

Photo: Daniel Appel (L), a firefighter with Engine 84 from the Lassen National Forest in California and Mike Hallen, (R), Arizona representative of the National Register of Big Trees, measure the circumference of this Saguaro cactus called the "Grand One," in the Tonto National Forest on July 1, 2005 35 miles north of Phoenix, near Carefree, Arizona. The cactus, estimated to be more than 200 years old, measures a circumference of 7 feet, 10 inches (2.4 meters) and stands 46 feet high (14 meters). The cactus was burned in the Cave Creek Complex fire and may not survive. It was once the largest Saguaro in the world, two others have been found recently that have tied it's measurements. The fire has burned more than 214,000 acres of the Sonoran desert. (Photo by Jeff Topping/Getty Images)
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26 Jul 2011 12:27:00
Suzanne Cryer poses for a portrait at the Television Academy's 67th Emmy Awards Performers Nominee Reception at the Pacific Design Center on Saturday, September 19, 2015 in West Hollywood, Calif. (Photo by Casey Curry/Invision for the Television Academy/AP Images)

Suzanne Cryer poses for a portrait at the Television Academy's 67th Emmy Awards Performers Nominee Reception at the Pacific Design Center on Saturday, September 19, 2015 in West Hollywood, Calif. (Photo by Casey Curry/Invision for the Television Academy/AP Images)
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22 Sep 2015 08:06:00
These portraits reveal the incredibly humanlike expressions of a variety of apes.Through piercing eyes and finite facial details, the intimate photographs show the animals looking angry, sad, delighted and pensive. They are the works of Manuela Kulpa – an IT consultant and keen photographer from near Cologne, Germany – who shot the apes predominantly at zoos across Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Germany and the Netherlands. Here: Bonobo, Azibo. (Photo by Manuela Kulpa/Caters News)

These portraits reveal the incredibly humanlike expressions of a variety of apes.Through piercing eyes and finite facial details, the intimate photographs show the animals looking angry, sad, delighted and pensive. They are the works of Manuela Kulpa – an IT consultant and keen photographer from near Cologne, Germany – who shot the apes predominantly at zoos across Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Germany and the Netherlands. Here: Bonobo, Azibo. (Photo by Manuela Kulpa/Caters News)
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26 Feb 2016 10:04:00
A talented portrait photographer has moved on from capturing traditional human subjects – instead photographing a stunning variety of wild animals. Brad Wilson, 51, stands just feet away from the likes of tigers, rhinos, elephants and primates. Each animal is given the same respect and dignity as any human subject, with Brad setting up a full photographic studio, either at or near sanctuaries and zoos across the U.S. (Photo by Brad Wilson/Caters News)

A talented portrait photographer has moved on from capturing traditional human subjects – instead photographing a stunning variety of wild animals. Brad Wilson, 51, stands just feet away from the likes of tigers, rhinos, elephants and primates. Each animal is given the same respect and dignity as any human subject, with Brad setting up a full photographic studio, either at or near sanctuaries and zoos across the U.S. The works are the second part of Brad's Affinity series, which the photographer – based in Los Angeles, California, first started working on in 2010. Here: Orangutan. (Photo by Brad Wilson/Caters News)
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16 Sep 2015 14:53:00
The photographer believes that the negative impressions pinned to rats stem from their wild siblings; Diane, however, focuses purely on domestic rats. (Photo by Diane Ozdamar/Caters News)

These adorable rat portraits were taken by a committed photographer who’s made it her mission to remove the stigma attached to the creatures. Diane Ozdamar’s vibrant images feature rodents cutely cuddling flowers, eating fruit, playing with bubbles, and lovingly interacting with each other. The 32-year-old photographer, who lives in Montreal, Canada, shot her «Fancy Rats» series over a number of years. (Photo by Diane Ozdamar/Caters News)
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14 Oct 2017 09:46:00
Nova, a Walpi, in 1906. (Photo by Edward S. Curtis)

At the beginning of the 20th century, Edward S. Curtis set out to document what he saw as a disappearing race: the Native American. From 1907 to 1930, Curtis took more than 2,000 photos of 80 tribes stretching from the Great Plains to the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. He then published and sold these photos, along with narrative text, in 20 volumes of work known as “The North American Indian”. It is one of the most significant collections of its kind, “probably the most important photographic document of its age and its topic,” said Jeffrey Garrett, associate university librarian for Special Libraries at Northwestern University. (Photo by Edward S. Curtis)
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07 Sep 2014 12:57:00
A Muslim bride waits for the start of a mass marriage ceremony in Mumbai, India, January 27, 2016. A total of 12 Muslim couples took their wedding vows during the mass marriage ceremony organised by a Muslim voluntary organisation, organisers said. (Photo by Danish Siddiqui/Reuters)

A Muslim bride waits for the start of a mass marriage ceremony in Mumbai, India, January 27, 2016. A total of 12 Muslim couples took their wedding vows during the mass marriage ceremony organised by a Muslim voluntary organisation, organisers said. (Photo by Danish Siddiqui/Reuters)
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28 Jan 2016 13:06:00
Untitled. (Photo by Vladimir Serov)

Untitled. (Photo by Vladimir Serov)
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03 Sep 2013 11:52:00