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Octopus By Marialuisa Tadei

Marialuisa Tadeis sculpture is very large compared to a life size octopus. The sculptures are made of steel and concrete. They are then turned into a mosaic using hand cut glass. The texture is bumpy because of the mosaic but is smooth on the glass. The main idea behind the sculpture is to explore spiritual and symbolic representation.
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22 Apr 2014 10:57:00
An octopus is filmed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub. (Photo by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)

An octopus is filmed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub. (Photo by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)
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13 Aug 2013 10:27:00
Underwater photographer of the year – winner. Dancing Octopus by Gabriel Barathieu (France). Location: Island of Mayotte, off the coast of south-east Africa. “Balletic and malevolent”, one judge said of this octopus, hunting in a lagoon. Barathieu waited until spring tides when there was just 30cm of water on the flats and plenty of light in the shallows. (Photo by Gabriel Barathieu/UPY2017)

Underwater photographer of the year – winner. Dancing Octopus by Gabriel Barathieu (France). Location: Island of Mayotte, off the coast of south-east Africa. “Balletic and malevolent”, one judge said of this octopus, hunting in a lagoon. Barathieu waited until spring tides when there was just 30cm of water on the flats and plenty of light in the shallows. (Photo by Gabriel Barathieu/UPY2017)
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16 Feb 2017 00:06:00
A South Korean man and a woman eat a live octopus during an event to promote a local food festival in Seoul on September 12, 2013. (Photo by Jung Yeon-Je/AFP Photo)

Live octopus is a delicacy in South Korea but is a known choking hazard, since the still-moving suction cups can cause tentacle pieces to stick in a person's throat. A baby octopus is often consumed whole, while larger varieties are cut up and the still-wriggling tentacles eaten with a splash of sesame oil. Photo: A South Korean man and a woman eat a live octopus during an event to promote a local food festival in Seoul on September 12, 2013. (Photo by Jung Yeon-Je/AFP Photo)
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13 Sep 2013 09:40:00
Whimsical Street Art by Filthy Luker

“Filthy Luker is a painter who is really attacking his audience. Who could think that a green octopus suddenly starts to creep out from the windows, a huge banana rind lounges just in the center of a road and the trees start to see!” (Photo by Filthy Luker/Vedi tutte le foto via Giornalettismo.com)
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14 May 2012 08:40:00
Wunderpus larva. (Photo by Ace Wu/Caters News Agency)

Ace Wu searches the deep to photograph stunning underwater creatures. Against their predominantly black backdrops, Wu’s breathtaking subjects glow with sublime vibrancy. In one, a fearsome fish glares at the camera with rows of sharp teeth showing, while in another, a translucent octopus looks like an extraterrestrial. Here: Wunderpus larva. (Photo by Ace Wu/Caters News Agency)
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08 May 2018 00:01:00
The Bajau people of Malaysia live their lives completely at sea, living in wooden huts and spending their days fishing. Sailing over crystal clear waters, the Bajau people of Malaysia live their lives almost entirely at sea. (Photo by Ng Choo Kia/Hotspot Media/SIPA Press)

The Bajau people of Malaysia live their lives completely at sea, living in wooden huts and spending their days fishing. Sailing over crystal clear waters, the Bajau people of Malaysia live their lives almost entirely at sea. Photographer Ng Choo Kia joined the Bajau people on their pirogues, which are long narrow canoes made from single tree trunks, and documented their daily life in a series of pictures. (Photo by Ng Choo Kia/Hotspot Media/SIPA Press)
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05 May 2015 10:49:00
Visitors at the National Zoo check out a parrotfish made from found waste from the ocean in Washington, DC on May 23, 2016. The artwork can be seen at the National Zoo until September 5th. (Photo by Keith Lane/The Washington Post)

Visitors at the National Zoo check out a parrotfish made from found waste from the ocean in Washington, DC on May 23, 2016. The artwork can be seen at the National Zoo until September 5th. (Photo by Keith Lane/The Washington Post)
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25 May 2016 13:11:00