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A police officer walks along a street of the burning village of Smolenka near Chita on Monday, April 13, 2015. Russian authorities say out-of-control agricultural fires have killed at least 15 people, injured hundreds more and destroyed or damaged more than 1,000 homes in Siberia. The fires were started by farmers burning the grass in their fields, but spread quickly because of strong winds. (Photo by Evgeny Yepanchintsev/AP Photo)

A police officer walks along a street of the burning village of Smolenka near Chita on Monday, April 13, 2015. Russian authorities say out-of-control agricultural fires have killed at least 15 people, injured hundreds more and destroyed or damaged more than 1,000 homes in Siberia. The fires were started by farmers burning the grass in their fields, but spread quickly because of strong winds. (Photo by Evgeny Yepanchintsev/AP Photo)
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14 Apr 2015 11:04:00
Youths kick a gay rights activist during a protest against a proposed new law termed by the State Duma, the lower house of Parliament, as “against advocating the rejection of traditional family values” in central Moscow June 11, 2013. (Photo by Maxim Shemetov/Reuters)

Youths kick a gay rights activist during a protest against a proposed new law termed by the State Duma, the lower house of Parliament, as “against advocating the rejection of traditional family values” in central Moscow June 11, 2013. (Photo by Maxim Shemetov/Reuters)
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12 Jun 2013 08:46:00
A woman argues with police officer during a protest in support of jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny in Ulan-Ude, the regional capital of Buryatia, a region near the Russia-Mongolia border, Russia, Wednesday, April 21, 2021. Navalny's team has called for nationwide protests on Wednesday following reports that the politician's health was deteriorating in prison, where he has been on hunger strike since March 31. Russian authorities have stressed that the demonstrations were not authorized and warned against participating in them. (Photo by Anna Ogorodnik/AP Photo)

A woman argues with police officer during a protest in support of jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny in Ulan-Ude, the regional capital of Buryatia, a region near the Russia-Mongolia border, Russia, Wednesday, April 21, 2021. Navalny's team has called for nationwide protests on Wednesday following reports that the politician's health was deteriorating in prison, where he has been on hunger strike since March 31. Russian authorities have stressed that the demonstrations were not authorized and warned against participating in them. (Photo by Anna Ogorodnik/AP Photo)

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22 Apr 2021 10:04:00
A member of the “Exit Point” amateur rope-jumping group jumps from a 44-metre high (144-ft) waterpipe bridge in the Siberian Taiga area outside Krasnoyarsk, November 3, 2013. (Photo by Ilya Naymushin/Reuters)

A member of the “Exit Point” amateur rope-jumping group jumps from a 44-metre high (144-ft) waterpipe bridge in the Siberian Taiga area outside Krasnoyarsk, November 3, 2013. Fans of rope-jumping, a kind of extreme sport involving a jump from a high point using an advanced leverage system combining mountaineering and rope safety equipment, marked the end of the group's jumping season and recent Halloween festivities. (Photo by Ilya Naymushin/Reuters)
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21 Apr 2014 09:57:00
Russia From Above: “An Explosive Scene”. The 1,486-meter-high Karymskii Volcano in Kamchatka. (Photo by Sergey Fomin)

Since 2003, photographer Sergey Fomin has been shooting Russia’s most attractive natural, historical, and architectural objects from different aircrafts. Photo: “An Explosive Scene”. The 1,486-meter-high Karymskii Volcano in Kamchatka. (Photo by Sergey Fomin)
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28 Sep 2014 11:39:00
In this photo taken on Friday, March 15, 2013, members of a pro-Kremlin youth group attack pushers of spice, a synthetic drug, in Moscow, Russia. Russian officials and anti-drugs campaigners say that spice has become one of the most dangerous drugs widely available to youngsters and almost impossible to ban because of the constantly changing chemical ingredients. (Photo by Alexander Zemlianichenko Jr/AP Photo)

In this photo taken on Friday, March 15, 2013, members of a pro-Kremlin youth group attack pushers of spice, a synthetic drug, in Moscow, Russia. Russian officials and anti-drugs campaigners say that spice has become one of the most dangerous drugs widely available to youngsters and almost impossible to ban because of the constantly changing chemical ingredients. (Photo by Alexander Zemlianichenko Jr/AP Photo)
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26 Apr 2013 08:39:00
Alexei Gruk, 45, mechanic and supporter of presidential candidate Pavel Grudinin, poses for a picture in St. Petersburg, Russia, January 31, 2018. “The most important thing for me is that our foreign policy stays the same”, said Gruk. “To hell with the sanctions… So what if they don’t bring foreign stuff here anymore? As if that means we have to give up. I don't care”. (Photo by Anton Vaganov/Reuters)

Most Russians intending to vote for Vladimir Putin in Sunday's election say stability is at the root of their faith in their candidate – though many young voters believe it's time for a change of leader. Putin, 65, is expected to win a fourth term in office with 69 percent of the vote, according to the latest survey by a state-run pollster. Reuters correspondents and photographers who travelled around the country talking to voters ahead of the March 18 election found nothing to contradict expectation of an emphatic Putin victory. (Photo by Anton Vaganov/Reuters)
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15 Mar 2018 00:01:00
A combination picture shows a voter, casting a ballot at a polling station number 216 (L) and walking with a ballot at a polling station number 217, during the presidential election in Ust-Djeguta, Russia March 18, 2018. The voter, asked by a Reuters reporter to explain why she was voting multiple times, ignored the question and walked away. (Photo by Reuters/Staff)

17 people were photographed by Reuters apparently casting ballots at more than one polling station Sunday during Russia’s presidential election in the town of Ust-Djeguta, southern Russia. Many appeared to be state employees, and some showed up in groups and in mini buses bearing the names of state-provided services. Voting twice is a misdemeanour under Russian law and those caught are heavily fined. But when shown these pictures, election commission member Leila Koichuyeva said: “They could be twins”. Here are a few. (Photo by Reuters/Staff)
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22 Mar 2018 06:22:00