Loading...
Done
A woman raises her fist during events to mark Juneteenth, which commemorates the end of slavery in Texas, two years after the 1863 Emancipation Proclamation freed slaves elsewhere in the United States, amid nationwide protests against racial inequality, in the Harlem neighbourhood of Manhattan, in New York City, New York, June 19, 2020. (Photo by Andrew Kelly/Reuters)

A woman raises her fist during events to mark Juneteenth, which commemorates the end of slavery in Texas, two years after the 1863 Emancipation Proclamation freed slaves elsewhere in the United States, amid nationwide protests against racial inequality, in the Harlem neighbourhood of Manhattan, in New York City, New York, June 19, 2020. (Photo by Andrew Kelly/Reuters)
Details
21 Jun 2020 00:07:00
A woman presents an Afro-Colombian hairstyle during the 9th contest of Afro-hairdressers, in Cali, Valle del Cauca departament, Colombia, on May 12, 2013. The Afro hairstyles have their origins in the time of slavery, when women sat to comb their children hair after work. (Photo by Luis Robayo/AFP Photo)

A woman presents an Afro-Colombian hairstyle during the 9th contest of Afro-hairdressers, in Cali, Valle del Cauca departament, Colombia, on May 12, 2013. The Afro hairstyles have their origins in the time of slavery, when women sat to comb their children hair after work. (Photo by Luis Robayo/AFP Photo)
Details
13 May 2013 11:01:00
A Black movement activist covered by red paint attends a protest against racism and police violence, and against a police operation that took place at Jacarezinho slum in Rio de Janeiro, on the day that marks 133 years since the abolition of Slavery in the country, in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on May 13, 2021. (Photo by Amanda Perobelli/Reuters)

A Black movement activist covered by red paint attends a protest against racism and police violence, and against a police operation that took place at Jacarezinho slum in Rio de Janeiro, on the day that marks 133 years since the abolition of Slavery in the country, in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on May 13, 2021. (Photo by Amanda Perobelli/Reuters)
Details
12 Feb 2022 06:15:00


146 West End Stars hold a flashmob in support of the non-profit organistation Love 146, which campaigns to end child s*x slavery and exploitation, at Trafalgar Sqaure on April 11, 2011 in London, England. (Photo by Tim Whitby/Getty Images)
Details
12 Apr 2011 07:28:00
“Great Crash”. (Photo by C. K. Wilde)

Artist C. K. Wilde creates intricate collage compositions using pieces of paper currency from all over the world. His collages have referenced subjects ranging from space exploration, to mythology, religion, slavery, ecology, the history of warfare, the history of money, and art history. Photo: “Great Crash”. (Photo by C. K. Wilde)
Details
11 Jul 2014 12:06:00
Prayers And Messages To God Are Removed From The Western Wall

Men help remove messages and prayers written by thousands of people addressed to God from the cracks in the Western Wall in preparation for the up coming Jewish Passover holiday on March 28, 2012 in Jerusalem's old city, Israel. All the notes once collected will be buried in a special place at the Mount of Olives.according tro Jewish law. Passover begins in the evening of Friday, April 6 and commemorates the story of the Exodus where the ancient Israelites were freed from slavery in Egypt. (Photo by Uriel Sinai/Getty Images)
Details
29 Mar 2012 12:32:00
Real Men Don't Buy Girls

The DNA Foundation launched a campaign targeting men with the message that Real Men Don't Buy Girls. The goal of the campaign was to create a cultural shift around the implicit societal acceptance of child prostitution, and thus, child s*x slavery. We hoped to reach millions of people with information about the issue. More than 2 million people have participated in the campaign so far. Here are some of the people who took a stand with us!
Details
28 Dec 2012 11:46:00
Winti spiritual leader Ramon Mac-Nack (2nd L) looks on as as his bride Melissa Karwafodi (2nd R) hands a gourd to a Maroon priest (L) as they are wedded in the first Winti marriage ever to be held in public, in district Para, Suriname, November 16, 2015. (Photo by Ranu Abhelakh/Reuters)

Winti spiritual leader Ramon Mac-Nack (2nd L) looks on as as his bride Melissa Karwafodi (2nd R) hands a gourd to a Maroon priest (L) as they are wedded in the first Winti marriage ever to be held in public, in district Para, Suriname, November 16, 2015. The Winti religion, which formed centuries ago out of elements of different religious traditions that African slaves brought with them to Suriname, was considered a form idolatry and prohibited by law since the days of slavery until it was finally officially recognized in 1971. (Photo by Ranu Abhelakh/Reuters)
Details
27 Nov 2015 05:51:00