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Business Flourishes For Brass Bands During Indian Wedding Season

A musician from the Rajan Band, Kotla Mubarakpur holds on to a decorated horse as he and others wait prior to performing at a wedding on November 22, 2011 in New Delhi, India. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
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27 Nov 2011 14:43:00
Revellers ride during the 54th annual brass band festival in the Serbian village of Guca August 7, 2014. Every year Guca is swamped by thousands of people taking part in the celebration of brass band music. (Photo by Marko Djurica/Reuters)

Revellers ride during the 54th annual brass band festival in the Serbian village of Guca August 7, 2014. Every year Guca is swamped by thousands of people taking part in the celebration of brass band music. (Photo by Marko Djurica/Reuters)
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10 Aug 2014 10:48:00
Three Burmese women members of a circus play cards as they wear the brass neck and leg rings traditionally worn by Padaung women since childhood and which cannot be removed, London, January 4, 1935. (Photo by Keystone)

Three Burmese women members of a circus play cards as they wear the brass neck and leg rings traditionally worn by Padaung women since childhood and which cannot be removed, London, January 4, 1935. (Photo by Keystone). P.S. All pictures are presented in high resolution.
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29 Aug 2012 11:18:00
A cat disrupts between Mexico's Tigres UANL and Real Salt Lake during a quarterfinals match as part of the Leagues Cup 2019 at Rio Tinto Stadium on July 24, 2019 in Sandy, Utah. (Photo by Jeff Swinger/USA TODAY Sports)

A cat disrupts between Mexico's Tigres UANL and Real Salt Lake during a quarterfinals match as part of the Leagues Cup 2019 at Rio Tinto Stadium on July 24, 2019 in Sandy, Utah. (Photo by Jeff Swinger/USA TODAY Sports)
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29 Jul 2019 00:03:00
At the 50th anniversary of the Hartford Automobile Club a 1914 Mercer with an economical wind screen, looking like a large magnifying glass, designed to offer minimum wind resistance. Brass is used instead of chrome for the “shiny” parts, circa 1955. (Photo by Three Lions)

At the 50th anniversary of the Hartford Automobile Club a 1914 Mercer with an economical wind screen, looking like a large magnifying glass, designed to offer minimum wind resistance. Brass is used instead of chrome for the “shiny” parts, circa 1955. (Photo by Three Lions)
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28 Sep 2012 10:56:00
This close-up image – of a Holi Festival celebrant in Vrindivan, India, coated in neon-colored powder – was submitted to National Geographic’s Your Shot in the last week of March. On April 1 we published it on our Daily News site, along with seven other bright scenes captured during the Hindu spring Festival of Colors. (Photo by Tinto Alencherry/National Geographic)

This close-up image – of a Holi Festival celebrant in Vrindivan, India, coated in neon-colored powder – was submitted to National Geographic’s Your Shot in the last week of March. On April 1 we published it on our Daily News site, along with seven other bright scenes captured during the Hindu spring Festival of Colors. (Photo by Tinto Alencherry/National Geographic)
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06 Jan 2014 12:30:00
Elio Angulo (bottom C) lies inside a cardboard coffin next to Alejandro Blanchard as they introduce their product to potential customers at a mortuary in Valencia, in the state of Carabobo, Venezuela August 25, 2016. (Photo by Marco Bello/Reuters)

Elio Angulo (bottom C) lies inside a cardboard coffin next to Alejandro Blanchard as they introduce their product to potential customers at a mortuary in Valencia, in the state of Carabobo, Venezuela August 25, 2016. When Venezuelan entrepreneurs Alejandro Blanchard and Elio Angulo decided to create cardboard coffins, they were looking for an ecological selling point to compete against classic wood and brass caskets. Three years on, with the oil-rich country mired in deep economic crisis, their “bio-coffins” are becoming a viable option because of high prices for wooden coffins and shortages of brass ones. (Photo by Marco Bello/Reuters)
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27 Aug 2016 11:18:00
Pyrite Cubic Crystals

The mineral pyrite, or iron pyrite, also known as fool's gold, is an iron sulfide with the formula FeS2. This mineral's metallic luster and pale brass-yellow hue give it a superficial resemblance to gold, hence the well-known nickname of fool's gold. The color has also led to the nicknames brass, brazzle, and Brazil, primarily used to refer to pyrite found in coal.
In crystallography, the cubic (or isometric) crystal system is a crystal system where the unit cell is in the shape of a cube. This is one of the most common and simplest shapes found in crystals and minerals.
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23 Nov 2013 13:31:00