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Kawakanih Yawalapiti, 9, Upper Xingu region of Mato Grosso, Brazil, 2018: Kawakanih lives with her tribe, the Yawalapiti, in Xingu national park, a preserve in the Amazon basin of Brazil. The Yawalapiti collect seeds to preserve species unique to their ecosystem, which lies between the rain forest and savannah. Kawakanih’s diet is simple, consisting mainly of fish, cassava, porridge, fruit and nuts. “It takes five minutes to catch dinner”, says Kawakanih. “When you’re hungry, you just go to the river with your net”. (Photo by Gregg Segal/The Guardian)

Photographer Gregg Segal travelled the world to document children and the food they eat in a week. Partly inspired by the increasing problems of childhood obesity, he tracked traditional regional diets as yet unaffected by globalisation, and ironically, found that the healthiest diets were often eaten by the least well off. (Photo by Gregg Segal/The Guardian)
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03 Jul 2019 00:03:00
What the World Eats By Peter Menzel And Faith D'Aluisio Part 1

A stunning photographic collection featuring portraits of people from 30 countries and the food they eat in one day. In this fascinating study of people and their diets, 80 profiles are organized by the total number of calories each person puts away in a day. Featuring a Japanese sumo wrestler, a Massai herdswoman, world-renowned Spanish chef Ferran Adria, an American competitive eater, and more, these compulsively readable personal stories also include demographic particulars, including age, activity level, height, and weight. Essays from Harvard primatologist Richard Wrangham, journalist Michael Pollan, and others discuss the implications of our modern diets for our health and for the planet. This compelling blend of photography and investigative reportage expands our understanding of the complex relationships among individuals, culture, and food.
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23 Apr 2014 14:34:00
What the World Eats By Peter Menzel And Faith D'Aluisio Part 2

A stunning photographic collection featuring portraits of people from 30 countries and the food they eat in one day. In this fascinating study of people and their diets, 80 profiles are organized by the total number of calories each person puts away in a day. Featuring a Japanese sumo wrestler, a Massai herdswoman, world-renowned Spanish chef Ferran Adria, an American competitive eater, and more, these compulsively readable personal stories also include demographic particulars, including age, activity level, height, and weight. Essays from Harvard primatologist Richard Wrangham, journalist Michael Pollan, and others discuss the implications of our modern diets for our health and for the planet. This compelling blend of photography and investigative reportage expands our understanding of the complex relationships among individuals, culture, and food.
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02 May 2014 09:20:00
An attendee at the “Eating Insects Detroit: Exploring the Culture of Insects as Food and Feed” conference at Wayne State University shows an edible freeze-dried locust insect in Detroit, Michigan May 26, 2016. (Photo by Rebecca Cook/Reuters)

An attendee at the “Eating Insects Detroit: Exploring the Culture of Insects as Food and Feed” conference at Wayne State University shows an edible freeze-dried locust insect in Detroit, Michigan May 26, 2016. (Photo by Rebecca Cook/Reuters)
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29 May 2016 09:41:00
Yang Juan, an employee at Goopal Group, takes a nap in her seat after lunch, in Beijing, China, April 21, 2016. (Photo by Jason Lee/Reuters)

Yang Juan, an employee at Goopal Group, takes a nap in her seat after lunch, in Beijing, China, April 21, 2016. Office workers sleeping on the job is a common sight in China, where a surplus of cheap labour can lead to downtime at work. But in China's technology sector, where business is growing faster than many start-up firms can hire new staff, workers burn the midnight oil to meet deadlines and compete with their rivals. Some companies provide sleeping areas and beds for workers to rest during late nights. (Photo by Jason Lee/Reuters)
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12 May 2016 14:53:00
Grapes Born of Volcano In Lanzarote, Spanish

The valley of La Geria, which has been declared a 'Protected Area', is Lanzarote’s main wine-growing region, occupying about 20 square miles (52 square kilometres) and stretching on both sides of the road from Masdache to Uga and right up to the volcanic slopes. This area produces most of Lanzarote’s excellent wines, of which 75 per cent are made from the Malvasía grape, one of the oldest known grape varieties. Best known as a honey-coloured, very sweet wine with a rich flavour, already praised by Shakespeare hundreds of years ago, today the Malvasía grape produces a wide variety of quality white, red or rosé wines, from very sweet to very dry.
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31 Oct 2013 09:10:00
Bear Eat Fish

Cynthia the Kodiak Bear enjoys a whole Tasmanian Atlantic Salmon to celebrate her 28th birthday at Taronga Zoo on January 17, 2005 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by Matt King/Getty Images)
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20 Sep 2011 12:34:00
A woman wears VR glasses while the projection mapping is cast on table and walls during its media preview at “TREE BY NAKED, yoyogi park” restaurant in Tokyo, Japan on July 19, 2018. (Photo by Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters)

A woman wears VR glasses while the projection mapping is cast on table and walls during its media preview at “TREE BY NAKED, yoyogi park” restaurant in Tokyo, Japan on July 19, 2018. This restaurant incorporates virtual reality, projection mapping, and music to enhance diners' enjoyment of their food. (Photo by Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters)
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23 Jul 2018 00:03:00