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Dancers take part in the Karneval der Kulturen (Carnival of Cultures) street parade of ethnic minorities in Berlin, Germany, May 15, 2016. (Photo by Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters)

Dancers take part in the Karneval der Kulturen (Carnival of Cultures) street parade of ethnic minorities in Berlin, Germany, May 15, 2016. (Photo by Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters)
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16 May 2016 10:44:00
An attendee takes a selfie at KCON USA, billed as the world's largest Korean culture convention and music festival, in Los Angeles, California on August 11, 2018. K-pop acts sing or rap in Korean, often with snippets of English. On the Web, where K-pop fandom thrives, many music videos include subtitles. (Photo by Mike Blake/Reuters)

An attendee takes a selfie at KCON USA, billed as the world's largest Korean culture convention and music festival, in Los Angeles, California on August 11, 2018. K-pop acts sing or rap in Korean, often with snippets of English. On the Web, where K-pop fandom thrives, many music videos include subtitles. (Photo by Mike Blake/Reuters)
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20 Aug 2018 00:01:00
Dancers take part in the Karneval der Kulturen (Carnival of Cultures) street parade of ethnic minorities, in Berlin, Germany, May 24, 2015. (Photo by Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters)

Dancers take part in the Karneval der Kulturen (Carnival of Cultures) street parade of ethnic minorities, in Berlin, Germany, May 24, 2015. A few dozen dancers, musicians and performers from dozens of communities took part in the urban festival on Sunday that aspires to reflect the multi-ethnic diversity of the German capital. (Photo by Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters)
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25 May 2015 09:20:00
A woman shoots her rifle at a forest shooting range near the village of Visnova, Czech Republic, June 9, 2016. (Photo by David W. Cerny/Reuters)

A woman shoots her rifle at a forest shooting range near the village of Visnova, Czech Republic, June 9, 2016. (Photo by David W. Cerny/Reuters)
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11 Jun 2016 12:17:00
A lady smiles during the annual Calabar cultural festival in Calabar, Nigeria, December 28, 2015. Picture taken December 28, 2015. (Photo by Reuters/Stringer)

A lady smiles during the annual Calabar cultural festival in Calabar, Nigeria, December 28, 2015. Picture taken December 28, 2015. (Photo by Reuters/Stringer)
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01 Jan 2016 08:03:00


Entertainers from the She Huo cultural troupe rehearse for the Edinburgh Military Tattoo at Redford barracks on August 5, 2009 in Edinburgh, Scotland. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
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12 Jun 2011 10:24:00
A visitor takes a picture of a display bearing hand prints of war heroes from the War of Resistance against Japan, at Jianchuan Museum Cluster in Anren, Sichuan Province, China, May 13, 2016. (Photo by Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters)

A visitor takes a picture of a display bearing hand prints of war heroes from the War of Resistance against Japan, at Jianchuan Museum Cluster in Anren, Sichuan Province, China, May 13, 2016. Tucked away in southwestern China's Sichuan province, a private collector stands virtually alone in exhibiting relics from the 1966-1976 Cultural Revolution. Monday marks the 50th anniversary of the start of the political movement, with no official commemorations planned. Official records whitewash the details of both periods, but admit that Mao made major mistakes. (Photo by Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters)
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16 May 2016 10:49:00
A mudlark uses a torch to look for items on the bank of the River Thames in London, Britain June 06, 2016. Mudlarking is believed to trace its origins to the 18th and 19th century, when scavengers searched the Thames' shores for items to sell. These days, history and archaeology fans are the ones hoping to find old relics such as coins, ceramics, artifacts or everyday items from across centuries. They wait for the low tide and then scour specific areas of exposed shores. "If you're in a field you could be out all day long, with the river you're restricted to about two or three hours," mudlark Nick Stevens said. While many just use the naked eye for their searches, others rely on metal detectors for which a permit from the Port of London Authority is needed. Digging also requires consent. (Photo by Neil Hall/Reuters)

A mudlark uses a torch to look for items on the bank of the River Thames in London, Britain June 06, 2016. Mudlarking is believed to trace its origins to the 18th and 19th century, when scavengers searched the Thames' shores for items to sell. These days, history and archaeology fans are the ones hoping to find old relics such as coins, ceramics, artifacts or everyday items from across centuries. their finds with the Portable Antiquities Scheme. Any item over 300 years old must be recorded. (Photo by Neil Hall/Reuters)
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27 Aug 2016 10:43:00