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In this photo taken Sunday, March 12, 2017, a girl Abuk walks home with her brothers and friends after collecting clean water from a water point four kilometers away from her home, in Aweil, in South Sudan. As World Water Day approaches on March 22, more than 5 million people in South Sudan, do not have access to safe, clean water, compounding the problems of famine and civil war, according to the UNICEF. (Photo by Mackenzie Knowles-Coursin/UNICEF via AP Photo)

In this photo taken Sunday, March 12, 2017, a girl Abuk walks home with her brothers and friends after collecting clean water from a water point four kilometers away from her home, in Aweil, in South Sudan. As World Water Day approaches on March 22, more than 5 million people in South Sudan, do not have access to safe, clean water, compounding the problems of famine and civil war, according to the UNICEF. (Photo by Mackenzie Knowles-Coursin/UNICEF via AP Photo)
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21 Mar 2017 07:53:00
In this photo taken Wednesday, March 8, 2017, a woman herder sits with her goats in a remote desert area near Bandar Beyla in Somalia's semiautonomous northeastern state of Puntland. Somalia has declared the drought a national disaster, part of what the United Nations calls the largest humanitarian crisis since the world body was founded in 1945, and with animals being central to many the drought threatens their main sources of nutrition and survival. (Photo by Ben Curtis/AP Photo)

In this photo taken Wednesday, March 8, 2017, a woman herder sits with her goats in a remote desert area near Bandar Beyla in Somalia's semiautonomous northeastern state of Puntland. Somalia has declared the drought a national disaster, part of what the United Nations calls the largest humanitarian crisis since the world body was founded in 1945, and with animals being central to many the drought threatens their main sources of nutrition and survival. (Photo by Ben Curtis/AP Photo)
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15 Mar 2017 00:03:00
Camel herders scoop up water in plastic buckets from one of the few watering holes in the area, to water their animals near the drought-affected village of Bandarero, near Moyale town on the Ethiopian border, in northern Kenya, Friday, March 3, 2017. The U.N. humanitarian chief, Stephen O'Brien, toured Bandarero village on Friday and called on the international community to act to “avert the very worst of the effects of drought and to avert a famine to make sure we don't go from what is deep suffering to a catastrophe”. (Photo by Ben Curtis/AP Photo)

Camel herders scoop up water in plastic buckets from one of the few watering holes in the area, to water their animals near the drought-affected village of Bandarero, near Moyale town on the Ethiopian border, in northern Kenya, Friday, March 3, 2017. The U.N. humanitarian chief, Stephen O'Brien, toured Bandarero village on Friday and called on the international community to act to “avert the very worst of the effects of drought and to avert a famine to make sure we don't go from what is deep suffering to a catastrophe”. (Photo by Ben Curtis/AP Photo)
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05 Mar 2017 00:03:00
South African Sangomas are wizards and witches who are supposedly chosen by their ancestors to follow a traditional training and go through a rite of passage after which they become Sangomas and can cure and help people. They are so respected and trusted that western medical authorities have actually advised the government of South Africa to develop its cooperation with Sangomas in order to improve hygiene and health among the population. Today is graduation day for Trissa, 25, a Sangoma student in Tembisa, near Pretoria. Thanks to the help of the spirits of her ancestors, she has found a cow that had been hidden. The cow has then been killed by Sangoma Thelma and Trissa is now drinking its blood, thus becoming a Sangoma and changing her name to Nomadlozi. Location: Tembisa, near Pretoria, South Africa. (Photo by Patrick Durand/Sygma via Getty Images)

South African Sangomas are wizards and witches who are supposedly chosen by their ancestors to follow a traditional training and go through a rite of passage after which they become Sangomas and can cure and help people. They are so respected and trusted that western medical authorities have actually advised the government of South Africa to develop its cooperation with Sangomas in order to improve hygiene and health among the population. (Photo by Patrick Durand/Sygma via Getty Images)
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24 Feb 2017 00:05:00
Miners work extremely long days under the hot sun and the hours are often longer in illegal mines in Ghana, West Africa, 2014. An Australian photographer has captured the harsh reality of illegal mining under the unforgiving sun with these Ghanaian miners. Heidi Woodman travelled to Ghana, West Africa to explore the regionís booming mining business, including the growing number of illegal mines. Using Accra as her base, Heidi visited the areas of Tarkwa, Kyebi, East Akim, Kumasi, Obuasi and Takoradi to find areas with a high concentration of galamsey – illegal mining activity. (Photo by Heidi Woodman/Barcroft Images)

Miners work extremely long days under the hot sun and the hours are often longer in illegal mines in Ghana, West Africa, 2014. An Australian photographer has captured the harsh reality of illegal mining under the unforgiving sun with these Ghanaian miners. (Photo by Heidi Woodman/Barcroft Images)
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24 Feb 2017 00:02:00
A boy moves away as a United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) helicopter lands in Rubkuai village, Unity State, northern South Sudan, February 18, 2017. (Photo by Siegfried Modola/Reuters)

A boy moves away as a United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) helicopter lands in Rubkuai village, Unity State, northern South Sudan, February 18, 2017. South Sudan on Monday declared famine in some parts of the country, with more than three years of war leaving nearly five million hungry in what aid groups called a “man-made” tragedy. (Photo by Siegfried Modola/Reuters)
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22 Feb 2017 00:03:00
An armed man herds his cattle close to the village of Nimini in northern South Sudan, February 8, 2017. (Photo by Siegfried Modola/Reuters)

An armed man herds his cattle close to the village of Nimini in northern South Sudan, February 8, 2017. In the chaos of South Sudan's civil war, it took three years for Nyagonga Machul to find her lost children. Machul had traveled from her village to the capital when President Salva Kiir, an ethnic Dinka, fired his deputy Riek Machar, a Nuer, in 2013. (Photo by Siegfried Modola/Reuters)
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19 Feb 2017 00:04:00
Baka pygmies in their forest home preparing food in, Sangha Forest, Central African Republic, February 2016. (Photo by Susan Schulman/Barcroft Images)

Baka pygmies in their forest home preparing food in, Sangha Forest, Central African Republic, February 2016. Here, in their forest home, traditional life continues in the face of multiplying challenges ranging from poachers, to ill health. Deep in the rainforests of central Africa lives one of the world’s most mysterious tribes. (Photo by Susan Schulman/Barcroft Images)
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18 Feb 2017 00:01:00