Loading...
Done
South African Sangomas are wizards and witches who are supposedly chosen by their ancestors to follow a traditional training and go through a rite of passage after which they become Sangomas and can cure and help people. They are so respected and trusted that western medical authorities have actually advised the government of South Africa to develop its cooperation with Sangomas in order to improve hygiene and health among the population. Today is graduation day for Trissa, 25, a Sangoma student in Tembisa, near Pretoria. Thanks to the help of the spirits of her ancestors, she has found a cow that had been hidden. The cow has then been killed by Sangoma Thelma and Trissa is now drinking its blood, thus becoming a Sangoma and changing her name to Nomadlozi. Location: Tembisa, near Pretoria, South Africa. (Photo by Patrick Durand/Sygma via Getty Images)

South African Sangomas are wizards and witches who are supposedly chosen by their ancestors to follow a traditional training and go through a rite of passage after which they become Sangomas and can cure and help people. They are so respected and trusted that western medical authorities have actually advised the government of South Africa to develop its cooperation with Sangomas in order to improve hygiene and health among the population. (Photo by Patrick Durand/Sygma via Getty Images)
Details
24 Feb 2017 00:05:00
Miners work extremely long days under the hot sun and the hours are often longer in illegal mines in Ghana, West Africa, 2014. An Australian photographer has captured the harsh reality of illegal mining under the unforgiving sun with these Ghanaian miners. Heidi Woodman travelled to Ghana, West Africa to explore the regionís booming mining business, including the growing number of illegal mines. Using Accra as her base, Heidi visited the areas of Tarkwa, Kyebi, East Akim, Kumasi, Obuasi and Takoradi to find areas with a high concentration of galamsey – illegal mining activity. (Photo by Heidi Woodman/Barcroft Images)

Miners work extremely long days under the hot sun and the hours are often longer in illegal mines in Ghana, West Africa, 2014. An Australian photographer has captured the harsh reality of illegal mining under the unforgiving sun with these Ghanaian miners. (Photo by Heidi Woodman/Barcroft Images)
Details
24 Feb 2017 00:02:00
A boy moves away as a United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) helicopter lands in Rubkuai village, Unity State, northern South Sudan, February 18, 2017. (Photo by Siegfried Modola/Reuters)

A boy moves away as a United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) helicopter lands in Rubkuai village, Unity State, northern South Sudan, February 18, 2017. South Sudan on Monday declared famine in some parts of the country, with more than three years of war leaving nearly five million hungry in what aid groups called a “man-made” tragedy. (Photo by Siegfried Modola/Reuters)
Details
22 Feb 2017 00:03:00
An armed man herds his cattle close to the village of Nimini in northern South Sudan, February 8, 2017. (Photo by Siegfried Modola/Reuters)

An armed man herds his cattle close to the village of Nimini in northern South Sudan, February 8, 2017. In the chaos of South Sudan's civil war, it took three years for Nyagonga Machul to find her lost children. Machul had traveled from her village to the capital when President Salva Kiir, an ethnic Dinka, fired his deputy Riek Machar, a Nuer, in 2013. (Photo by Siegfried Modola/Reuters)
Details
19 Feb 2017 00:04:00
Baka pygmies in their forest home preparing food in, Sangha Forest, Central African Republic, February 2016. (Photo by Susan Schulman/Barcroft Images)

Baka pygmies in their forest home preparing food in, Sangha Forest, Central African Republic, February 2016. Here, in their forest home, traditional life continues in the face of multiplying challenges ranging from poachers, to ill health. Deep in the rainforests of central Africa lives one of the world’s most mysterious tribes. (Photo by Susan Schulman/Barcroft Images)
Details
18 Feb 2017 00:01:00
Cattle are the most important way of livelihood for the Karamojong: they provide milk, meat, blood and money when sold, Karamoja, Uganda, February 2017. (Photo by Sumy Sadurni/Barcroft Images)

Cattle are the most important way of livelihood for the Karamojong: they provide milk, meat, blood and money when sold, Karamoja, Uganda, February 2017. (Photo by Sumy Sadurni/Barcroft Images)
Details
17 Feb 2017 00:02:00
A production department of a textile factory is seen abandoned in Kaduna, Nigeria November 3, 2016. (Photo by Afolabi Sotunde/Reuters)

A production department of a textile factory is seen abandoned in Kaduna, Nigeria November 3, 2016. President Muhammadu Buhari hopes to revive the once flourishing textile and leather industries in northern Nigeria to end the country's dependence on oil exports and diversify Africa's biggest economy. (Photo by Afolabi Sotunde/Reuters)
Details
17 Feb 2017 00:01:00
Miss Langata Prison 2016 Ruth Kamande poses for a photograph as female inmates participate in a fashion parade as part of their Valentine's Day celebration, dubbed “love behind bars” inside the Langata Women Maximum Security Prison in Kenya's capital Nairobi, February 14, 2017. (Photo by Thomas Mukoya/Reuters)

Miss Langata Prison 2016 Ruth Kamande poses for a photograph as female inmates participate in a fashion parade as part of their Valentine's Day celebration, dubbed “love behind bars” inside the Langata Women Maximum Security Prison in Kenya's capital Nairobi, February 14, 2017. (Photo by Thomas Mukoya/Reuters)
Details
16 Feb 2017 00:03:00