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In this January 12, 2016 photo, an abandoned boat lies on the dried up lake bed of Lake Poopo, on the outskirts of Untavi, Bolivia. Drought caused by the recurrent El Nino meteorological phenomenon is considered the main driver of the lake's demise. Along with glacial melting, authorities say another factor is the diversion of water from Poopo's tributaries, mostly for mining but also for agriculture. (Photo by Juan Karita/AP Photo)

In this January 12, 2016 photo, an abandoned boat lies on the dried up lake bed of Lake Poopo, on the outskirts of Untavi, Bolivia. Drought caused by the recurrent El Nino meteorological phenomenon is considered the main driver of the lake's demise. Along with glacial melting, authorities say another factor is the diversion of water from Poopo's tributaries, mostly for mining but also for agriculture. (Photo by Juan Karita/AP Photo)
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21 Jan 2016 12:33:00
Mohammad Ashgar, 65, an Indian rickshaw puller, poses for a photograph next to his rickshaw in Kolkata on April 21, 2018. A mainstay of 19 th century transportation options, the hand- pulled rickshaw survives in India only in Kolkata after being outlawed elsewhere. The local puller's union puts the number of pullers in the city at 3,000. The union has resisted all previous attempts to ban their livelihood, previously organising mass protests of their members against moves to stamp out the practice. (Photo by Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP Photo)

Ahead of May Day, AFP' s video and photo teams spoke to men and women around the globe whose jobs are becoming increasingly rare, particularly as technology transforms societies. Here: Mohammad Ashgar, 65, an Indian rickshaw puller, poses for a photograph next to his rickshaw in Kolkata on April 21, 2018. (Photo by Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP Photo)
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02 May 2018 00:01:00
A mine worker is seen outside “The Progreso” gold mine near La Paz, November 13, 2014. According to local media, the president of the Central Bank of Bolivia (BCB) Marcelo Zabalaga said on Thursday that the falling price of oil and minerals in the international market will not affect the national economy. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

A mine worker is seen outside “The Progreso” gold mine near La Paz, November 13, 2014. According to local media, the president of the Central Bank of Bolivia (BCB) Marcelo Zabalaga said on Thursday that the falling price of oil and minerals in the international market will not affect the national economy. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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16 Nov 2014 12:04:00
A member of the Diablada  Urus group attends  the carnival parade in Oruro, Bolivia February 25, 2017. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

A member of the Diablada Urus group attends the carnival parade in Oruro, Bolivia February 25, 2017. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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28 Feb 2017 00:04:00
A member of the “Morenada Los Cocanis” group dances during the Carnival parade in Oruro February 14, 2015. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

A member of the “Morenada Los Cocanis” group dances during the Carnival parade in Oruro February 14, 2015. Thousands of dancers and tourists attend the carnival celebrations in Oruro, south of La Paz. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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15 Feb 2015 14:25:00
Skulls placed on the floor are seen during a ceremony held for the "Dia de las natitas" (Day of the Skull) celebrations at the General Cemetery of La Paz, November 8, 2015. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

Skulls placed on the floor are seen during a ceremony held for the "Dia de las natitas" (Day of the Skull) celebrations at the General Cemetery of La Paz, November 8, 2015. Bolivians, who keep close relatives skulls at home as a macabre talisman, flock to the cemetery chapel once a year to have the craniums blessed and to bring themselves good luck in the future. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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12 Nov 2015 08:01:00
A woman sells statues of the Ekeko, god of fortune, at the traditional “Alasitas” fair in La Paz January 24, 2015. During the fair, Bolivians buy miniature versions of goods like cars, money and houses they would like to own in real life during the year. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

A woman sells statues of the Ekeko, god of fortune, at the traditional “Alasitas” fair in La Paz January 24, 2015. During the fair, Bolivians buy miniature versions of goods like cars, money and houses they would like to own in real life during the year. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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25 Jan 2015 09:59:00
Aymara witchdoctor Ricardo Quispe, also called “Lord of the Lake”, throws coca leaves during a ritual to predict the future, at the witches market of El Alto, on the outskirts of La Paz, December 31, 2014. Dozens of witch doctors tend to a warren of stalls in El Alto, making offerings to give thanks, to promise luck at work or in love, or to call up spirits and banish curses at the end of the year. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)

Aymara witchdoctor Ricardo Quispe, also called “Lord of the Lake”, throws coca leaves during a ritual to predict the future, at the witches market of El Alto, on the outskirts of La Paz, December 31, 2014. Dozens of witch doctors tend to a warren of stalls in El Alto, making offerings to give thanks, to promise luck at work or in love, or to call up spirits and banish curses at the end of the year. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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01 Jan 2015 14:05:00