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“Chameleon and Begonia”. (Photo by Arie van't Riet)

Physicist Arie van't Riet uses a series of duel X-ray cameras to capture flowers, plants and small animals in living dioramas. The x-rays are then finished and colorized in Photoshop. Giving way to some breathtaking nature scenes. Photo: “Chameleon and Begonia”. (Photo by Arie van't Riet)
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13 Mar 2014 05:45:00
An x-ray of a woman drinking, taken by British artist and photographer Hugh Turvey in London, England. (Photo by Hugh Turvey/SPL/Barcroft Media)

An x-ray of a woman drinking, taken by British artist and photographer Hugh Turvey in London, England. (Photo by Hugh Turvey/SPL/Barcroft Media)
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14 Feb 2014 09:52:00
X-Rays of Presents Hugh Turvey

British Institute of Radiology artist-in-residence Hugh Turvey creates images with x-rays to reveal the hidden contents of wrapped presents.
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04 Jul 2013 12:01:00
“Stripper”: Has tucked her cash away safely. (Photo by Nick Veasey/Barcroft Media)

British artist Nick Veasey used an X-ray machine to show us exactly what's going on under people's clothes. The equipment took copies of items separately before they were mashed together to create characters and situations. The work is part of Veasey's latest exhibition named “X-ray Voyeurism”. In order to create the work, the 51-year-old has spent the last 20 years exposing himself to harmful radiation in his studio. Photo: “Stripper”: Has tucked her cash away safely. (Photo by Nick Veasey/Barcroft Media)
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22 Jun 2014 10:49:00
These stunning coloured images show detailed x-ray images of everything from skulls to light bulbs. Artist Paula Fontaine, from Westminster Massachusetts, created the images using a process called digital map painting. Here: Brain storm, conceptual composite X-ray. (Photo by Paula Fontaine/Barcroft Media)

These stunning coloured images show detailed x-ray images of everything from skulls to light bulbs. Artist Paula Fontaine, from Westminster Massachusetts, created the images using a process called digital map painting. To create the images the x-ray emission source – the head of the machine on an arm which focuses the beam – is placed over the object. Paula then retreats behind a shielded screen before activating the x-ray exposure. Here: Brain storm, conceptual composite X-ray. (Photo by Paula Fontaine/Barcroft Media)
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27 Mar 2015 13:34:00
Coloured X-ray of a barn owl. A physicist has used X-ray to create an extraordinary collection of artwork. Arie van't Riets pictures reveal birds, fish, monkeys and flowers in an incredible new light. The 66-year-old, from Bathmen in the Netherlands, began X-raying flowers as a means to teach radiographers and physicians how the machine worked. But after adding a bit of colour to the pictures, the retired medical physicist realised the potential for an exciting new collection of art. (Photo by Arie van't Riet/Barcroft Media)

Coloured X-ray of a barn owl. A physicist has used X-ray to create an extraordinary collection of artwork. Arie van't Riets pictures reveal birds, fish, monkeys and flowers in an incredible new light. The 66-year-old, from Bathmen in the Netherlands, began X-raying flowers as a means to teach radiographers and physicians how the machine worked. But after adding a bit of colour to the pictures, the retired medical physicist realised the potential for an exciting new collection of art. (Photo by Arie van't Riet/Barcroft Media)
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08 Jul 2014 13:25:00
Australian photographer Brendan Fitzpatrick’s X-ray photographs expose the inner workings of toys. Fitzpatrick’s photographs are both whimsical and mechanical, evoking the curiosity of childhood and the desire to discover how things look and work from other perspectives. (Photo by Brendan Fitzpatrick)

Australian photographer Brendan Fitzpatrick’s X-ray photographs expose the inner workings of toys. Fitzpatrick’s photographs are both whimsical and mechanical, evoking the curiosity of childhood and the desire to discover how things look and work from other perspectives. The strategic placement of wires, batteries, and screws are revealed, the complexity of the inside contrasting with the seemingly simplistic design of the outside. Fitzpatrick uses chest X-ray and mammogram machines to photograph flowers, toys, and creatures, then enhances the color in the images in order to more effectively distinguish the various parts that have been exposed. This photographs are part of series he calls “Invisible Light”. (Photo by Brendan Fitzpatrick)
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08 Aug 2014 10:59:00
The Dragon’s Skull

Yes this is not a real dragon’s skull but it is still pretty creepy. This weird little plant is called a Snapdragon or Dragon flower or, if you want to sound even smarter, The Antirrhinum. Once the flower has died, the seed pod begins to look like the skulls you see here. Apart from being creepy as hell and alleged protectors of the garden, if you wore this about your body you would appear to be more “fascinating and gracious”. Though I imagine if anyone actually did find this on you, fascinating and gracious are not the only things they will think about you.
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22 Oct 2013 08:31:00