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Public Space series, 2015. This series by Morteza Niknahad and Behnam Zakeri tends toward cinema, taking an almost cartoonish view of modern life in Iran. This work was inspired by the social life of dolphins. (Photo by Morteza Niknahad and Behnam Zakeri/The Guardian)

Public Space series, 2015. This series by Morteza Niknahad and Behnam Zakeri tends toward cinema, taking an almost cartoonish view of modern life in Iran. This work was inspired by the social life of dolphins. (Photo by Morteza Niknahad and Behnam Zakeri/The Guardian)
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19 Jul 2017 08:26:00
When she was starting out in Paris, Roy became influenced by Guy Bourdin, whose fashion photography contained strange, often haunting narratives. She liked the idea of “making little stories” in a single frame. (Photo by Kourtney Roy/Galerie Catherine et André Hug/The Guardian)

Kourtney Roy makes eerie self-portraits in desolate yet dramatic locations – with wigs and wardrobe straight out of 1950s melodrama. In these shots, from her “Enter as Fiction – California” series, she plays characters caught in desolate, often abandoned settings. (Photo by Kourtney Roy/Galerie Catherine et André Hug/The Guardian)
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12 Jul 2017 07:46:00
Three elephant seals put on a show in Roie Galitz's “Three Tanors”, taken on January 7, 2016 in South Georgia Island. (Photo by Roie Galitz/CWPA/Barcroft Images)

Three elephant seals put on a show in Roie Galitz's “Three Tanors”, taken on January 7, 2016 in South Georgia Island. The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards are in full swing, so check out some of the fierce competitors jostling for the top prize this year. Photographers Paul Joynson-Hicks MBE and Tom Sullam founded the awards to spotlight wildlife conservation efforts and to inject some humour into the world of wildlife photography. (Photo by Roie Galitz/CWPA/Barcroft Images)
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07 Jul 2017 07:16:00
Scared of Heights. “Taken from the highest residential building in Asia: the Zenith in Busan. This was taken with official permission (which took me months to get) and safety measures were taken. I had to hang myself over the edge to get this shot. Not for the faint of heart! But when you’re at a height like this, the world below you just seems different. It takes away the fear one would normally have, and gives a sense of peace instead”. (Photo by Albert Dros/NatGeo Cities Travel Photographer of the Year 2017)

Scared of Heights. “Taken from the highest residential building in Asia: the Zenith in Busan. This was taken with official permission (which took me months to get) and safety measures were taken. I had to hang myself over the edge to get this shot. Not for the faint of heart! But when you’re at a height like this, the world below you just seems different. It takes away the fear one would normally have, and gives a sense of peace instead”. (Photo by Albert Dros/NatGeo Cities Travel Photographer of the Year 2017)
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03 Jul 2017 08:55:00
“The Salmon Catchers”. Terrestrial Wildlife. To capture this view of a mother grizzly bear and her cub, photographer Peter Mather set up a camera trap on a log that he knew the bears tended to traverse while fishing for salmon, in the Yukon River watershed in Canada. (Photo by Peter Mather/BigPicture Natural World Photography Competition 2017)

The fourth annual BigPicture Natural World Photography Competition aims to celebrate the diversity of life on Earth, and encourages people to protect and conserve it. Here: “The Salmon Catchers”. Terrestrial Wildlife. To capture this view of a mother grizzly bear and her cub, photographer Peter Mather set up a camera trap on a log that he knew the bears tended to traverse while fishing for salmon, in the Yukon River watershed in Canada. (Photo by Peter Mather/BigPicture Natural World Photography Competition 2017)
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02 Jul 2017 07:25:00
“A very delicate person, beneath the flamboyance”. Jasper, Ladbroke Grove, 1977. “In the 1970s, Australia was rather cut off. I’d always wanted to live abroad, so I moved to Rome and then London. I was an art historian, but started studying photography part-time. I was interested in the demi-monde culture and began mixing in all sorts of circles. Jasper was a rather wonderful character. He was from Sydney, but he was living downstairs from me in Ladbroke Grove, in a flat rented to some gay friends. It was fairly eclectic. Jasper was always playing around with clothes and makeup. If he was looking particularly wonderful, I might get out my lights and take a shot. Or he might put makeup on me. He wasn’t always in drag, but he was permanently in diva mode, dependably louche, funny and naughty. I think all that comes across in the image. He was actually a very delicate person, though, beneath the wit and flamboyance. Jasper floated through London all too briefly. His real name was Peter MacMahon, but to us he was only ever Jasper Havoc, an alter ego he’d created while part of a transvestite troupe called Sylvia and the Synthetics. They were legendary in Sydney gay culture. On this day, we’d been taking some pictures inside and had gone out into the streets to fool around some more. Jasper was wearing a corset and fishnets ensemble, with other bits and pieces, and we joked about him being trashy as he lay in the skip. We just took the shot for ourselves. It wasn’t done with any publication in mind, or anything else. This was way before the internet and people didn’t share images. If you dressed up, it was just for that moment”. (Photo by Jane England)

“A very delicate person, beneath the flamboyance”. Jasper, Ladbroke Grove, 1977. “In the 1970s, Australia was rather cut off. I’d always wanted to live abroad, so I moved to Rome and then London. I was an art historian, but started studying photography part-time. I was interested in the demi-monde culture and began mixing in all sorts of circles. Jasper was a rather wonderful character...”. (Photo by Jane England)
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26 Jun 2017 09:04:00
Fabrice Monteiro travelled to the most polluted places in Africa and created terrifying characters who roamed their midst dressed in eerie debris. They are spirits, he says, on a mission to make humans change their ways. Informed by Africa’s environmental problems, Fabrice Monteiro’s photographs aim to highlight urgent ecological issues all over the world. His series “The Prophecy” is on show at Photo Basel 2017 until 18 June. (Photo by Fabrice Monteiro/Photo Basel 2017/Mariane Ibrahim Gallery/The Guardian)

Fabrice Monteiro travelled to the most polluted places in Africa and created terrifying characters who roamed their midst dressed in eerie debris. They are spirits, he says, on a mission to make humans change their ways. Informed by Africa’s environmental problems, Fabrice Monteiro’s photographs aim to highlight urgent ecological issues all over the world. His series “The Prophecy” is on show at Photo Basel 2017 until 18 June. (Photo by Fabrice Monteiro/Photo Basel 2017/Mariane Ibrahim Gallery/The Guardian)
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17 Jun 2017 08:38:00
A lonely dog watches the mailboxes in a typical Moscow residential block. (Photo by by Frank Herfort/The Guardian)

From stuffed elephants to picnics under power lines, Leipzig-born photographer Frank Herfort coaxes magical, colour-saturated tableaux from intriguing slices of everyday Russian life. Here: A lonely dog watches the mailboxes in a typical Moscow residential block. (Photo by by Frank Herfort/The Guardian)
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06 Jun 2017 08:36:00