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A helicopter of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) flies through millions of Locusts as spreads pesticide to fight against a swarm of locusts threatening to reach Amparihibe village on May 7, 2014 in Tsiroanomandidy , Madagascar. FAO mission is to fight the locust's swarm with an insecticide. (Photo by AFP Photo/RIJASOLO)

A helicopter of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) flies through millions of Locusts as spreads pesticide to fight against a swarm of locusts threatening to reach Amparihibe village on May 7, 2014 in Tsiroanomandidy, Madagascar. FAO mission is to fight the locust's swarm with an insecticide. (Photo by AFP Photo/RIJASOLO)
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16 May 2014 08:32:00
A referee tries to separate two cocks fighting during a Cock fighting tournament on December 3, 2016 on the outskirts of Antananarivo. (Photo by Gianluigi Guercia/AFP Photo)

A referee tries to separate two cocks fighting during a Cock fighting tournament on December 3, 2016 on the outskirts of Antananarivo, Madagascar. Cockfighting is held during the week end and is a tradition with asian roots still practiced in Madagascar. (Photo by Gianluigi Guercia/AFP Photo)
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10 Dec 2016 08:28:00
The Sifaka jumps along the road. (Photo by Shannon Wild/Caters News Agency)

The Verreauxs Sifaka, otherwise known as Dancing Sifaka, who was caught strutting its stuff in Madagascar, has definitely learnt a lesson or two from King Julian – from the 2005 film “Madagascar”. Raising both of its arms and lunging from side to side, this lemur definitely likes to move it, move it. (Photo by Shannon Wild/Caters News Agency)
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24 Jan 2018 06:17:00
Poppy, a female Crowned sifaka, inspects a photographer's camera in the enclosure at the zoo of Mulhouse, eastern France, on March 5, 2019. The Crowned sifaka is a critically endangered species from Madagascar. (Photo by Sebastien Bozon/AFP Photo)

Poppy, a female Crowned sifaka, inspects a photographer's camera in the enclosure at the zoo of Mulhouse, eastern France, on March 5, 2019. The Crowned sifaka is a critically endangered species from Madagascar. (Photo by Sebastien Bozon/AFP Photo)
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10 Mar 2019 00:03:00
A veterinarian from the zoo of Besancon feeds “Soa”, a female crowned sifaka, in Besancon, eastern France, on February 18, 2019. The crowned sifaka is a critically endangered species from Madagascar. There were only 6 females over 20 individuals living in 7 zoos worldwide end of 2018. (Photo by Sébastien Bozon/AFP Photo)

A veterinarian from the zoo of Besancon feeds “Soa”, a female crowned sifaka, in Besancon, eastern France, on February 18, 2019. The crowned sifaka is a critically endangered species from Madagascar. There were only 6 females over 20 individuals living in 7 zoos worldwide end of 2018. (Photo by Sébastien Bozon/AFP Photo)
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24 Feb 2019 00:03:00
Avenue of the Baobabs

The Avenue or Alley of the Baobabs is a prominent group of baobab trees lining the dirt road between Morondava and Belon'i Tsiribihina in the Menabe region in western Madagascar. Its striking landscape draws travelers from around the world, making it one of the most visited locations in the region. It has been a center of local conservation efforts, and was granted temporary protected status in July 2007 by the Ministry of Environment, Water and Forests, the first step toward making it Madagascar's first natural monument.
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16 Nov 2012 10:05:00
“Locusts & Men”. Oppression, interaction, collaboration. In the life cycle of nature nothing is lost, but the coexistence of different species is sometimes difficult. In Madagascar periodically returns the archaic antagonism between man and the migratory locust, in a circle of life where the two species are looking for space and food for their survival. Photo location: Madagascar, 2013. (Photo and caption by Michele Martinelli/National Geographic Photo Contest)

“Locusts & Men”. Oppression, interaction, collaboration. In the life cycle of nature nothing is lost, but the coexistence of different species is sometimes difficult. In Madagascar periodically returns the archaic antagonism between man and the migratory locust, in a circle of life where the two species are looking for space and food for their survival. At the end of the day a man walks home carrying on his shoulders the heavy bag which contains the locusts captured during the day. The insects provide nutritious meals for the man and his family. Photo location: Madagascar, 2013. (Photo and caption by Michele Martinelli/National Geographic Photo Contest)

ATTENTION! All pictures are presented in high resolution. To see Hi-Res images – just TWICE click on any picture. In other words, click small picture – opens the BIG picture. Click BIG picture – opens VERY BIG picture.
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03 Dec 2013 10:59:00
Is it a leaf? Is it tree bark? No, it’s the Satanic leaf-tailed gecko. Cleverly disguised as a rotting leaf, Madagascar’s camouflage king has red eyes, pointy horns and a taste for night hunting: it’s nature’s most devilish deceiver. (Photo by Thomas Marent/ARDEA)

Is it a leaf? Is it tree bark? No, it’s the Satanic leaf-tailed gecko. Cleverly disguised as a rotting leaf, Madagascar’s camouflage king has red eyes, pointy horns and a taste for night hunting: it’s nature’s most devilish deceiver. The twisted body and veiny skin echo the detail of a dry leaf, which ensures the gecko blends in with its forest home. The mottled tail appears to have sections missing, as though it has withered over time. This mini-monster epitomises survival of the fittest, having adapted gradually to become today’s extraordinary leaf impersonator. (Photo by Thomas Marent/ARDEA)
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20 Nov 2015 08:03:00