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Fly Me To The Moon

Fly Me To The Moon... (Photo by Fred Locklear)
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26 Jun 2012 09:57:00
Meital Ben Ari, a co-founder of “Freedom Farm” pats Gary, a sheep with leg braces, at the farm which serves as a refuge for mostly disabled animals in Moshav Olesh, Israel on March 7, 2019. (Photo by Nir Elias/Reuters)

Meital Ben Ari, a co-founder of “Freedom Farm” pats Gary, a sheep with leg braces, at the farm which serves as a refuge for mostly disabled animals in Moshav Olesh, Israel on March 7, 2019. (Photo by Nir Elias/Reuters)
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15 Mar 2019 00:03:00
Martin Herrera, 58, who has had a love for roosters since his childhood, and has spent the last 20 years domesticating and training them, walks with his favorite rooster “Paquito” in San Jose, Costa Rica April 27, 2017. (Photo by Juan Carlos Ulate/Reuters)

Martin Herrera, 58, who has had a love for roosters since his childhood, and has spent the last 20 years domesticating and training them, walks with his favorite rooster “Paquito” in San Jose, Costa Rica April 27, 2017. (Photo by Juan Carlos Ulate/Reuters)
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05 May 2017 07:34:00
An installation entitled “Take my lightning but don't steal my thunder” by British artist Alex Chinneck stands in Covent Garden on October 2, 2014 in London, England.  The installation is intended to cast the illusion that a 40-foot section of the Covent Garden's 184-year old market building is floating. “Take my lightning but don't steal my thunder” will be on display from 2nd to 24th October 2014. (Photo by Rob Stothard/Getty Images)

An installation entitled “Take my lightning but don't steal my thunder” by British artist Alex Chinneck stands in Covent Garden on October 2, 2014 in London, England. The installation is intended to cast the illusion that a 40-foot section of the Covent Garden's 184-year old market building is floating. “Take my lightning but don't steal my thunder” will be on display from 2nd to 24th October 2014. (Photo by Rob Stothard/Getty Images)
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03 Oct 2014 11:40:00


“The Guinness World Records has consistently listed Sherlock Holmes as the “most portrayed movie character” with 75 actors playing the part in over 211 films. Holmes' first screen appearance was in the Mutoscope film Sherlock Holmes Baffled in 1900, albeit in a barely-recognisable form”. – Wikipedia

Photo: William Gillette as the lead in a stage production of “Sherlock Holmes”, at the Lyceum Theatre. Playwright: William Gillette, Arthur Conan Doyle (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images). 9th September 1901
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20 Jun 2011 10:55:00
The OMG Wall (Groningen, Groningen, NL). (Photo by Wout)

The “OMG Wall” (Groningen, NL). (Photo by Wout)
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07 Jun 2013 11:56:00
Aimee, 19, who has Down syndrome, has make-up applied by her mother before a presentation in Monterrey, Mexico, in this picture taken April 9, 2016. (Photo by Daniel Becerril/Reuters)

Aimee, 19, who has Down syndrome, has make-up applied by her mother before a presentation in Monterrey, Mexico, in this picture taken April 9, 2016. The association “Abrazame con Discapacidad” (“Embrace me with Disabilities”) teaches folk dance to low-income people with Down syndrome and manages presentations at public events where they receive a payment, as part of a therapy that helps improve their motor system, learning and self-esteem, the association said. (Photo by Daniel Becerril/Reuters)
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16 Apr 2016 12:19:00
Bodie, Mono County, California. Gold was discovered at Bodie in 1859 (just after the initial California gold rush) and it went from mining camp to boomtown. Its decline began in 1880, when word spread of new boomtowns elsewhere. The Standard Consolidated Mine closed in 1913, and four years later the Bodie Railway was abandoned. By 1940 the population was down to 40. Today, Bodie is maintained in a state of arrested decay as a visitor attraction. (Photo by Alamy Stock Photo)

Kieron Connolly’s new book of photographs of more than 100 once-busy and often elegant buildings gives an idea of how the world might look if humankind disappeared. Here: Bodie, Mono County, California. Gold was discovered at Bodie in 1859 (just after the initial California gold rush) and it went from mining camp to boomtown. Its decline began in 1880, when word spread of new boomtowns elsewhere. The Standard Consolidated Mine closed in 1913, and four years later the Bodie Railway was abandoned. By 1940 the population was down to 40. Today, Bodie is maintained in a state of arrested decay as a visitor attraction. (Photo by Alamy Stock Photo)
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07 Sep 2016 09:50:00